Bio


Pamela Matson is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary Earth scientist, academic leader and organizational strategist.

A MacArthur Fellow and elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Matson has served as dean of the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford since 2002. She has led the School through significant change, targeted at helping improve the University’s ability to engage in use- inspired research and to educate future leaders in the sustainability challenges related to Earth resources, hazards and environment. During the same time period, Matson co-led the Stanford Challenge Initiative on Environment and Sustainability, and helped build the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Precourt Institute for Energy as well as the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources.

Scientifically, Matson is a global thought leader who works to reconcile the needs of people and the planet in the 21st century. Her research addresses a range of environment and sustainability issues, including sustainability of agricultural systems; vulnerability of particular people and places to climate change; and environmental consequences of tropical land use change and global change in the nitrogen and carbon cycles. With multidisciplinary teams of researchers, managers, and decision makers, she has worked to develop agricultural approaches that reduce environmental impacts while maintaining livelihoods and human wellbeing.

Matson is the author of numerous scientific publications and books, including the recently published Seeds of Sustainability, and the National Research Council volumes Our Common Journey: A Transition toward Sustainability and America’s Climate Choices. She is the founding co-chair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, and serves on the boards of FFAR (Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, World Wildlife Fund and Climate Works Foundation. She is a past president of the Ecological Society of America, past lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and was a member of the science leadership committee for the International Geosphere-Atmosphere Programme.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment (2005 - Present)
  • Naramore Dean of the School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University (2002 - Present)
  • Co-director Center for Environmental Science and Policy, Stanford University (2000 - 2002)
  • Sant Director of the Earth Systems Program, Stanford University (1999 - 2002)
  • Goldman Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (1997 - Present)
  • Professor, University of California, Berkeley (1993 - 1998)
  • Research Scientist, NASA-Ames Research Center (1983 - 1993)
  • Post-doctoral Fellow Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University (1983 - 1983)

Honors & Awards


  • Doctor of Science Honorary Degree, Arizona State University (2014)
  • Honorary Member, British Ecological Society (2013)
  • Top 100 Women of Influence, Silicon Valley Business Journal (2013)
  • Fellow, Ecological Society of America (2012)
  • Einstein Visiting Professor, Chinese National Academy (2011)
  • Eminent Ecologist Award, Colorado State University (2009)
  • Major contributor to Nobel Peace prize awarded to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Norwegian Nobel Committee (2007)
  • The 2005 Richard W. Lyman Award, Stanford University (2005)
  • McMurtry University Fellow for Undergraduate Education, McMurtry University (2002)
  • National Associate, National Academy of Sciences (2002)
  • Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professorship, Stanford University (1999)
  • Distinguished Alumni Award, Oregon State University (1998)
  • School of Public and Environmental Affairs Distinguished Alumni Award, Indiana University (1998)
  • AAAS Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1997)
  • Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (1996)
  • MacArthur Fellow, MacArthur Fellowship (1995-2000)
  • Elected Member, National Academy of Sciences (1994)
  • Exceptional Service Medal, NASA (1993)
  • Elected Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1992)
  • Fellow, Ames (NASA) Associate (1992)
  • Research Paper Award, Oregon State University (1984)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Board of Directors, FFAR (Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research) (2014 - Present)
  • Chair, Provost's Committee on Sustainability, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Vice Chair, Board of Trustees, World Wildlife Fund (2012 - Present)
  • Keynote Address, Resilience 2011 Conference, Arizona State University, Tempe (2011 - 2011)
  • Member, ClimateWorks Advisory Board (2011 - Present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, National Park System (2010 - 2012)
  • Betty Klepper Lecture, Crop Science Society of America Meeting, Long Beach, Crop Science Society of America (2010 - 2010)
  • Session speaker, Annual Meeting in San Francisco, American Geophysical Union (2010 - 2010)
  • Member, Visiting Committee for MIT's Department of Civil and Evironmental Engineering, MIT (2010 - 2010)
  • Member, External Advisory Board for School of Global Environmental Sustainability, Colorado State University (2010 - 2010)
  • Keynote speaker, Wallace Stegner Center for Land, Resources and the Environment Annual Symposium, University of Utah (2010 - 2010)
  • Distinguished Lecturer, University of Hawaii, Honolulu (2010 - 2010)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Annual Review of Energy and the Environment (2010 - Present)
  • Member, NAS Committee on America's Climate Choices, National Academy of Science (2009 - Present)
  • Member, NAS Committee on Climate, Energy and National Security, National Academy of Science (2009 - Present)
  • Member, Board, Climate Central, Inc. (2009 - Present)
  • Invited speaker, "Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions" in Copenhagen, Denmark, University of Copenhagen and the International Alliance of Research Universities (2009 - 2009)
  • Member, NAS Science Ambassador Program Advisory Board, National Academy of Science (2009 - 2010)
  • Member, NAS Certification Committee, National Academy of Science (2009 - 2009)
  • Participant, NSF Conference "Towards a Science of Sustainability", National Science Foundation (2009 - 2009)
  • Presenter at Symposium during AAAS Annual Meeting. Invited lecture at the University of Texas, Austin., The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2008 - 2008)
  • Speaker at Three Symposia at AAAS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Invited lectures at Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Duke University and Oregon State University., The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2007 - 2007)
  • Member, Board of Trustees, Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University (2007 - Present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, (2007 - Present)
  • Member, Advisory Council, Woods Institute for the Environment (2006 - Present)
  • Plenary Lecture at AAAS Annual Meeting, St. Louis. Invited lectures at Arizona State University, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) All-Scientists Meeting. Panelist at Society of Petroleum Engineering Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition., The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006 - 2006)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2006 - Present)
  • Invited lecturer, The University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville (2005 - 2005)
  • Science Director, Leopold Leadership Program, Stanford University (2004 - Present)
  • Stanford Environmental Initiative Leader, Stanford University (2004 - 2011)
  • Invited lecturer, University of Georgia, Athens, Brown University and Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory. (2004 - 2004)
  • Member, Board of Trustees, World Wildlife Fund (2003 - Present)
  • Invited lecturer, Yale University, Masachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton University (2003 - 2003)
  • Ex Officio member of Stanford University Academic Senate, Stanford University (2002 - Present)
  • Founding Editor-in-Chief, Annual Review of Environment and Resources (2002 - 2008)
  • Invited Seminars: Stanford Think Again in Washington, Vancouver;, Stanford Think Again (2002 - 2002)
  • External Review Committee, Life Sciences Initiative, Cornell University (2002 - 2002)
  • Sophomore Advisor, Stanford University (2001 - 2006)
  • Member, Executive Committee of the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University (2001 - 2006)
  • President, Ecological Society of America (2001 - 2003)
  • Chair, Section on Ecology and Environmental Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (2001 - 2004)
  • Advisory Committee for Environmental Program, Luce Foundation (2001 - 2007)
  • Invited Seminars, University of Illinois, Harvard Univeristy, UC Davis, University of Wisconsin, Stanford University (2001 - 2001)
  • Founding Co-Chair, NAS Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, National Academy of Sciences (2001 - 2009)
  • Founding Editor, Annual Review of Energy and the Environment (2001 - 2009)
  • Member, Provost's Task Force on University Needs, Stanford University (2000 - 2001)
  • Invited Seminars, Carnegie Institution Global Ecology Lecturer, World Affairs Council of Northern California, Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Sciences Presidents' Circle, Stanford Law School, Peninsula Geological Association (2000 - 2000)
  • Chair, Ad hoc Committee for a Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies Graduate Program, Stanford University (2000 - 2001)
  • External Review Committee, University of Utah (2000 - 2000)
  • President Elect, Ecological Society of America (2000 - 2001)
  • Member, National Academy of Sciences Temporary Nominating Group on Global and Human Environmental Science, National Academy of Sciences (2000 - 2004)
  • Member, Coordinating Committee on the Sustainability Transition, National Academies of Science (2000 - 2002)
  • Member, Board of Trustees, National Park Conservation Association (2000 - 2007)
  • Provost's Committee on Environment, Stanford University (1999 - 2004)
  • Dean of the School of Education Search Committee, Stanford University (1999 - 2000)
  • Provost's Committee to form Stanford Institute for the Environment, Stanford University (1999 - 2003)
  • Director, Earth Systems Program, Stanford University (1999 - 2002)
  • Invited Seminars, Carnegie Institution Capital Science Lecture, International Botanical Congress, UC Davis, IGBP Congress keynote speaker, University of Connecticut Teale Lecturer, Penn State Life Sciences Consortium Colloquium, State University of New York (1999 - 1999)
  • Invited testimony, California Senate Environmental Quality Committee (1999 - 1999)
  • Acting Director, Earth Systems Program, Stanford University (1998 - 1999)
  • Institute for International Studies Search Committee, Stanford University (1998 - 2001)
  • Invited Seminars, National Academy of Sciences Symposium, USDA Anniversary Celebration, UCSC Resources in Environmental Education Program, SCOPE 10th General Assembly, University of Minnesota Lindeman Lecturer (1998 - 1998)
  • Lead Author, Working Group 1, Chapter 4, IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) (1998 - 2001)
  • Member, International SCOPE project on nitrogen transport and transformations, SCOPE (1998 - 2000)
  • Member, Science Advisory Committee, Organization of Tropical Studies (1998 - 2001)
  • Liaison, Section 27, National Academy of Sciences (1998 - 2001)
  • Co-Chair, Section 27, National Academy of Sciences (1998 - 2001)
  • Editorial Board, Annual Review of Energy and Environment (1998 - 2000)
  • Program Committee for the XVI International Botanical Congress, International Botanical Congress (1998 - 1999)
  • Sexual Harassment Advisor, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University (1997 - 2001)
  • Goldman Honors Program faculty member, Stanford University (1997 - 2002)
  • Invited Seminars, Oregon State University; University of Texas, Austin; Colorado State University, Eminent Ecologists Series (3 seminars); UC Santa Cruz; Stanford University; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Greater Yellowstone Coalition, Boseman (1997 - 1997)
  • Member and Executive Committee Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (1997 - 2001)
  • Editorial Board, Ecosystems (1997 - 2002)
  • Member, U.S. National Committee, Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) (1996 - 1999)
  • Member, Advisory Committee, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (1996 - 2000)
  • Member, Board of Trustees, Institute of Ecosystem Studies (1995 - 2004)
  • Member, Board on Sustainable Development, National Academy of Sciences (1995 - 2000)
  • Member, Mission to Planet Earth Advisory Committee, NASA (1994 - 1997)
  • Member, Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange Study Advisory Committee, NASA (1994 - 1998)
  • Chair, Sustainable Biosphere Initiative Steering Committee, Ecological Society of America (1994 - 2000)
  • Editorial Board, Ecological Applications (1994 - 2000)
  • Editorial Board, Global Change Biology (1994 - 1997)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Aspen Global Change Institute (1992 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Oregon State University, Forest Ecology (1983)
  • M.S., Indiana University, Environmental Science (1980)
  • B.S., University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Biology (magna cum laude) (1975)

2014-15 Courses


Journal Articles


  • Towards seaport resilience for climate change adaptation: Stakeholder perceptions of hurricane impacts in Gulfport (MS) and Providence (RI) Progress in Planning Becker, A., Matson, P., Fischer, M., Mastrandrea, M. 2014
  • Energy in the Context of Sustainability DAEDALUS Bierbaum, R. M., Matson, P. A. 2013; 142 (1): 146-161
  • Planetary Opportunities: A Social Contract for Global Change Science to Contribute to a Sustainable Future BIOSCIENCE DeFries, R. S., Ellis, E. C., Chapin, F. S., Matson, P. A., Turner, B. L., Agrawal, A., Crutzen, P. J., Field, C., Gleick, P., Kareiva, P. M., Lambin, E., Liverman, D., Ostrom, E., Sanchez, P. A., Syvitski, J. 2012; 62 (6): 603-606
  • Transformations, transport, and potential unintended consequences of high sulfur inputs to Napa Valley vineyards PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Hinckley, E. S., Matson, P. A. 2011; 108 (34): 14005-14010

    Abstract

    Unintended anthropogenic deposition of sulfur (S) to forest ecosystems has a range of negative consequences, identified through decades of research. There has been far less study of purposeful S use in agricultural systems around the world, including the application of elemental sulfur (S(0)) as a quick-reacting fungicide to prevent damage to crops. Here we report results from a three-year study of the transformations and flows of applied S(0) in soils, vegetation, and hydrologic export pathways of Napa Valley, CA vineyards, documenting that all applied S is lost from the vineyard ecosystem on an annual basis. We found that S(0) oxidizes rapidly to sulfate ( ) on the soil surface where it then accumulates over the course of the growing season. Leaf and grape tissues accounted for only 7-13% of applied S whereas dormant season cover crops accounted for 4-10% of applications. Soil S inventories were largely and ester-bonded sulfates; they decreased from 1,623 ± 354 kg ha(-1) during the dry growing season to 981 ± 526 kg ha(-1) (0-0.5 m) during the dormant wet season. Nearly all S applied to the vineyard soils is transported offsite in dissolved oxidized forms during dormant season rainstorms. Thus, the residence time of reactive S is brief in these systems, and largely driven by hydrology. Our results provide new insight into how S use in vineyards constitutes a substantial perturbation of the S cycle in Northern California winegrowing regions and points to the unintended consequences that agricultural S use may have at larger scales.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1110741108

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294163500034

    View details for PubMedID 21825150

  • Integrated soil-crop system management for food security PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Chen, X., Cui, Z., Vitousek, P. M., Cassman, K. G., Matson, P. A., Bai, J., Meng, Q., Hou, P., Yue, S., Roemheld, V., Zhang, F. 2011; 108 (16): 6399-6404

    Abstract

    China and other rapidly developing economies face the dual challenge of substantially increasing yields of cereal grains while at the same time reducing the very substantial environmental impacts of intensive agriculture. We used a model-driven integrated soil-crop system management approach to develop a maize production system that achieved mean maize yields of 13.0 t ha(-1) on 66 on-farm experimental plots--nearly twice the yield of current farmers' practices--with no increase in N fertilizer use. Such integrated soil-crop system management systems represent a priority for agricultural research and implementation, especially in rapidly growing economies.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1101419108

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289680400020

    View details for PubMedID 21444818

  • Short-term fates of high sulfur inputs in Northern California vineyard soils NUTRIENT CYCLING IN AGROECOSYSTEMS Hinckley, E. S., Fendorf, S., Matson, P. 2011; 89 (1): 135-142
  • Narrowing the agronomic yield gap with improved nitrogen use efficiency: a modeling approach ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Ahrens, T. D., Lobell, D. B., Ortiz-Monasterio, J. I., Li, Y., Matson, P. A. 2010; 20 (1): 91-100

    Abstract

    Improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in the major cereals is critical for more sustainable nitrogen use in high-input agriculture, but our understanding of the potential for NUE improvement is limited by a paucity of reliable on-farm measurements. Limited on-farm data suggest that agronomic NUE (AE(N)) is lower and more variable than data from trials conducted at research stations, on which much of our understanding of AE(N) has been built. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and causes of variability in AE(N) across an agricultural region, which we refer to as the achievement distribution of AE(N). The distribution of simulated AE(N) in 80 farmers' fields in an irrigated wheat system in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, was compared with trials at a local research center (International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center; CIMMYT). An agroecosystem simulation model WNMM was used to understand factors controlling yield, AE(N), gaseous N emissions, and nitrate leaching in the region. Simulated AE(N) in the Yaqui Valley was highly variable, and mean on-farm AE(N) was 44% lower than trials with similar fertilization rates at CIMMYT. Variability in residual N supply was the most important factor determining simulated AE(N). Better split applications of N fertilizer led to almost a doubling of AE(N), increased profit, and reduced N pollution, and even larger improvements were possible with technologies that allow for direct measurement of soil N supply and plant N demand, such as site-specific nitrogen management.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275358100007

    View details for PubMedID 20349832

  • Linking knowledge with action in the pursuit of sustainable water-resource management Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Jacobs, K., Lebel, L., Buizer, J., Addams, L., Matson, P., McCullough, E., Garden, P., Saliba, G., Finan, T. 2010

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0813125107

  • The Sustainability Transition ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Matson, P. 2009; 25 (4): 39-42
  • Nutrient Balances in Agricultural Development Science Vitousek, P. M., Naylor, R., Crews, T., David, M. B., Drinkwater, L. E., Holland, E., Jones, P. J., Katzenberger, J., Martinelli, L. A., Matson, P. A., Nziguheba, G., Ojima, D., Palm, C. A., Robertson, G. P., Sanchez, A., Townsend, A. R., Zhang, F. 2009; 324 (5934): 1519-1520
  • A synthesis of nitrogen transformations and transfers from land to the sea in the Yaqui Valley agricultural region of Northwest Mexico WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Ahrens, T. D., Beman, J. M., Harrison, J. A., Jewett, P. K., Matson, P. A. 2008; 44
  • Ecosystem services: From theory to implementation PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Daily, G. C., Matson, P. A. 2008; 105 (28): 9455-9456

    Abstract

    Around the world, leaders are increasingly recognizing ecosystems as natural capital assets that supply life-support services of tremendous value. The challenge is to turn this recognition into incentives and institutions that will guide wise investments in natural capital, on a large scale. Advances are required on three key fronts, each featured here: the science of ecosystem production functions and service mapping; the design of appropriate finance, policy, and governance systems; and the art of implementing these in diverse biophysical and social contexts. Scientific understanding of ecosystem production functions is improving rapidly but remains a limiting factor in incorporating natural capital into decisions, via systems of national accounting and other mechanisms. Novel institutional structures are being established for a broad array of services and places, creating a need and opportunity for systematic assessment of their scope and limitations. Finally, it is clear that formal sharing of experience, and defining of priorities for future work, could greatly accelerate the rate of innovation and uptake of new approaches.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0804960105

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257784700003

    View details for PubMedID 18621697

  • Reconciling carbon-cycle concepts, terminology, and methods ECOSYSTEMS Chapin, F. S., Woodwell, G. M., Randerson, J. T., Rastetter, E. B., Lovett, G. M., Baldocchi, D. D., Clark, D. A., Harmon, M. E., Schimel, D. S., Valentini, R., Wirth, C., Aber, J. D., Cole, J. J., Goulden, M. L., Harden, J. W., Heimann, M., Howarth, R. W., Matson, P. A., McGuire, A. D., Melillo, J. M., Mooney, H. A., Neff, J. C., Houghton, R. A., Pace, M. L., Ryan, M. G., Running, S. W., Sala, O. E., Schlesinger, W. H., Schulze, E. 2006; 9 (7): 1041-1050
  • A case study of land reform and coastal land transformation in southern Sonora, Mexico LAND USE POLICY Luers, A. L., Naylor, R. L., Matson, P. A. 2006; 23 (4): 436-447
  • The influence of tropical plant diversity and composition on soil microbial communities MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Carney, K. M., Matson, P. A. 2006; 52 (2): 226-238

    Abstract

    There is growing interest in understanding the linkages between above- and belowground communities, and very little is known about these linkages in tropical systems. Using an experimental site at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we examined whether plant diversity, plant community composition, and season influenced microbial communities. We also determined whether soil characteristics were related to differences in microbial communities. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition revealed that microbial community composition differed across a plant diversity gradient (plots contained 1, 3, 5, or over 25 species). Plant species identity also was a factor influencing microbial community composition; PLFA composition significantly varied among monocultures, and among three-species combinations that differed in plant species composition. Differences among treatments within each of these comparisons were apparent in all four sampling dates of the study. There was no consistent shift in microbial community composition between wet and dry seasons, although we did see significant changes over time. Of all measured soil characteristics, soil C/N was most often associated with changes in microbial community composition across treatment groups. Our findings provide evidence for human alteration of soil microbial communities via the alteration of plant community composition and diversity and that such changes are mediated in part by changes in soil carbon quality.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00248-006-9115-z

    View details for Web of Science ID 000240481000007

    View details for PubMedID 16897297

  • Business strategies for conservation on private lands: Koa forestry as a case study PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Goldstein, J. H., Daily, G. C., Friday, J. B., Matson, P. A., Naylor, R. A. 2006; 103 (26): 10140-10145

    Abstract

    Innovative financial instruments are being created to reward conservation on private, working lands. Major design challenges remain, however, to make investments in biodiversity and ecosystem services economically attractive and commonplace. From a business perspective, three key financial barriers for advancing conservation land uses must frequently be addressed: high up-front costs, long time periods with no revenue, and high project risk due to long time horizons and uncertainty. We explored ways of overcoming these barriers on grazing lands in Hawaii by realizing a suite of timber and conservation revenue streams associated with their (partial) reforestation. We calculated the financial implications of alternative strategies, focusing on Acacia koa ("koa") forestry because of its high conservation and economic potential. Koa's timber value alone creates a viable investment (mean net present value = $453/acre), but its long time horizon and poor initial cash flow pose formidable challenges for landowners. At present, subsidy payments from a government conservation program targeting benefits for biodiversity, water quality, and soil erosion have the greatest potential to move landowners beyond the tipping point in favor of investments in koa forestry, particularly when combined with future timber harvest (mean net present value = $1,661/acre). Creating financial mechanisms to capture diverse ecosystem service values through time will broaden opportunities for conservation land uses. Governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private investors have roles to play in catalyzing this transition by developing new revenue streams that can reach a broad spectrum of landowners.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0600391103

    View details for Web of Science ID 000238872900070

    View details for PubMedID 16782816

  • Agricultural intensification: Will land spared from farming be land spared for nature? CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. 2006; 20 (3): 709-710
  • Variations in soil N cycling and trace gas emissions in wet tropical forests OECOLOGIA Holtgrieve, G. W., Jewett, P. K., Matson, P. A. 2006; 146 (4): 584-594

    Abstract

    We used a previously described precipitation gradient in a tropical montane ecosystem of Hawai'i to evaluate how changes in mean annual precipitation (MAP) affect the processes resulting in the loss of N via trace gases. We evaluated three Hawaiian forests ranging from 2200 to 4050 mm year-1 MAP with constant temperature, parent material, ecosystem age, and vegetation. In situ fluxes of N2O and NO, soil inorganic nitrogen pools (NH4+ and NO3-), net nitrification, and net mineralization were quantified four times over 2 years. In addition, we performed 15N-labeling experiments to partition sources of N2O between nitrification and denitrification, along with assays of nitrification potential and denitrification enzyme activity (DEA). Mean NO and N2O emissions were highest at the mesic end of the gradient (8.7+/-4.6 and 1.1+/-0.3 ng N cm-2 h-1, respectively) and total oxidized N emitted decreased with increased MAP. At the wettest site, mean trace gas fluxes were at or below detection limit (

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00442-005-0222-1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000234145300010

    View details for PubMedID 16205956

  • Plant communities, soil microorganisms, and soil carbon cycling: Does altering the world belowground matter to ecosystem functioning? ECOSYSTEMS Carney, K. M., Matson, P. A. 2005; 8 (8): 928-940
  • Analysis of wheat yield and climatic trends in Mexico FIELD CROPS RESEARCH Lobell, D. B., Ortiz-Monasterio, J. I., Asner, G. P., Matson, P. A., Naylor, R. L., Falcon, W. P. 2005; 94 (2-3): 250-256
  • Consequences of nitrogen additions for soil losses from wet tropical forests ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Lohse, K. A., Matson, P. 2005; 15 (5): 1629-1648
  • Effects of a diel oxygen cycle on nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions in a eutrophied subtropical stream AQUATIC SCIENCES Harrison, J. A., Matson, P. A., Fendorf, S. E. 2005; 67 (3): 308-315
  • Agricultural runoff fuels large phytoplankton blooms in vulnerable areas of the ocean NATURE Beman, J. M., Arrigo, K. R., Matson, P. A. 2005; 434 (7030): 211-214

    Abstract

    Biological productivity in most of the world's oceans is controlled by the supply of nutrients to surface waters. The relative balance between supply and removal of nutrients--including nitrogen, iron and phosphorus--determines which nutrient limits phytoplankton growth. Although nitrogen limits productivity in much of the ocean, large portions of the tropics and subtropics are defined by extreme nitrogen depletion. In these regions, microbial denitrification removes biologically available forms of nitrogen from the water column, producing substantial deficits relative to other nutrients. Here we demonstrate that nitrogen-deficient areas of the tropical and subtropical oceans are acutely vulnerable to nitrogen pollution. Despite naturally high nutrient concentrations and productivity, nitrogen-rich agricultural runoff fuels large (54-577 km2) phytoplankton blooms in the Gulf of California. Runoff exerts a strong and consistent influence on biological processes, in 80% of cases stimulating blooms within days of fertilization and irrigation of agricultural fields. We project that by the year 2050, 27-59% of all nitrogen fertilizer will be applied in developing regions located upstream of nitrogen-deficient marine ecosystems. Our findings highlight the present and future vulnerability of these ecosystems to agricultural runoff.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nature03370

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227494500044

    View details for PubMedID 15758999

  • Diversity and composition of tropical soil nitrifiers across a plant diversity gradient and among land-use types ECOLOGY LETTERS Carney, K. M., Matson, P. A., Bohannan, B. J. 2004; 7 (8): 684-694
  • Global change and the earth system: A planet under pressure NATURE von Storch, H. 2004; 429 (6989): 244-245

    View details for DOI 10.1038/429244a

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221505900019

  • A method for quantifying vulnerability, applied to the agricultural system of the Yaqui Valley, Mexico GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE-HUMAN AND POLICY DIMENSIONS Luers, A. L., Lobell, D. B., Sklar, L. S., Addams, C. L., Matson, P. A. 2003; 13 (4): 255-267
  • Erosion and the rejuvenation of weathering-derived nutrient supply in an old tropical landscape ECOSYSTEMS Vitousek, P., Chadwick, O., Matson, P., Allison, S., Derry, L., Kettley, L., Luers, A., Mecking, E., Monastra, V., Porder, S. 2003; 6 (8): 762-772
  • Effect of land use change on soil carbon in Hawaii BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Osher, L. J., Matson, P. A., Amundson, R. 2003; 65 (2): 213-232
  • Nutrient losses over four million years of tropical forest development ECOLOGY Hedin, L. O., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 2003; 84 (9): 2231-2255
  • Patterns and controls of nitrous oxide emissions from waters draining a subtropical agricultural valley GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES Harrison, J., Matson, P. 2003; 17 (3)
  • A framework for vulnerability analysis in sustainability science PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Turner, B. L., Kasperson, R. E., Matson, P. A., McCarthy, J. J., Corell, R. W., Christensen, L., Eckley, N., Kasperson, J. X., Luers, A., Martello, M. L., Polsky, C., Pulsipher, A., Schiller, A. 2003; 100 (14): 8074-8079

    Abstract

    Global environmental change and sustainability science increasingly recognize the need to address the consequences of changes taking place in the structure and function of the biosphere. These changes raise questions such as: Who and what are vulnerable to the multiple environmental changes underway, and where? Research demonstrates that vulnerability is registered not by exposure to hazards (perturbations and stresses) alone but also resides in the sensitivity and resilience of the system experiencing such hazards. This recognition requires revisions and enlargements in the basic design of vulnerability assessments, including the capacity to treat coupled human-environment systems and those linkages within and without the systems that affect their vulnerability. A vulnerability framework for the assessment of coupled human-environment systems is presented.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1231335100

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184222500009

    View details for PubMedID 12792023

  • Illustrating the coupled human-environment system for vulnerability analysis: Three case studies PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Turner, B. L., Matson, P. A., McCarthy, J. J., Corell, R. W., Christensen, L., Eckley, N., Hovelsrud-Broda, G. K., Kasperson, J. X., Kasperson, R. E., Luers, A., Martello, M. L., Mathiesen, S., Naylor, R., Polsky, C., Pulsipher, A., Schiller, A., Selin, H., Tyler, N. 2003; 100 (14): 8080-8085

    Abstract

    The vulnerability framework of the Research and Assessment Systems for Sustainability Program explicitly recognizes the coupled human-environment system and accounts for interactions in the coupling affecting the system's responses to hazards and its vulnerability. This paper illustrates the usefulness of the vulnerability framework through three case studies: the tropical southern Yucatán, the arid Yaqui Valley of northwest Mexico, and the pan-Arctic. Together, these examples illustrate the role of external forces in reshaping the systems in question and their vulnerability to environmental hazards, as well as the different capacities of stakeholders, based on their access to social and biophysical capital, to respond to the changes and hazards. The framework proves useful in directing attention to the interacting parts of the coupled system and helps identify gaps in information and understanding relevant to reducing vulnerability in the systems as a whole.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1231334100

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184222500010

    View details for PubMedID 12815106

  • Nutrient status of tropical rain forests influences soil N dynamics after N additions ECOLOGICAL MONOGRAPHS Hall, S. J., Matson, P. A. 2003; 73 (1): 107-129
  • Agricultural sustainability and intensive production practices NATURE Tilman, D., Cassman, K. G., Matson, P. A., Naylor, R., Polasky, S. 2002; 418 (6898): 671-677

    Abstract

    A doubling in global food demand projected for the next 50 years poses huge challenges for the sustainability both of food production and of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the services they provide to society. Agriculturalists are the principal managers of global usable lands and will shape, perhaps irreversibly, the surface of the Earth in the coming decades. New incentives and policies for ensuring the sustainability of agriculture and ecosystem services will be crucial if we are to meet the demands of improving yields without compromising environmental integrity or public health.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nature01014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000177305600053

    View details for PubMedID 12167873

  • Policy implications of human-accelerated nitrogen cycling (Reprinted from Biogeochemistry, vol 52, pg 281-320, 2001) BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Mosier, A. R., Bleken, M. A., Chaiwanakupt, P., Ellis, E. C., Freney, J. R., Howarth, R. B., Matson, P. A., Minami, K., Naylor, R., Weeks, K. N., Zhu, Z. L. 2002; 57 (1): 477-516
  • Carbon cycling and soil carbon storage in mesic to wet Hawaiian montane forests ECOLOGY Schuur, E. A., Chadwick, O. A., Matson, P. A. 2001; 82 (11): 3182-3196
  • Net primary productivity and nutrient cycling across a mesic to wet precipitation gradient in Hawaiian montane forest OECOLOGIA Schuur, E. A., Matson, P. A. 2001; 128 (3): 431-442
  • Identifying the agricultural imprint on the global N2O budget using stable isotopes JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Perez, T., Trumbore, S. E., Tyler, S. C., Matson, P. A., Ortiz-Monasterio, I., Rahn, T., Griffith, D. W. 2001; 106 (D9): 9869-9878
  • Physical and biogeochemical controls over terrestrial ecosystem responses to nitrogen deposition BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Asner, G. P., Townsend, A. R., Riley, W. J., Matson, P. A., Neff, J. C., Cleveland, C. C. 2001; 54 (1): 1-39
  • Environment and development - Sustainability science SCIENCE Kates, R. W., Clark, W. C., Corell, R., Hall, J. M., Jaeger, C. C., Lowe, I., McCarthy, J. J., Schellnhuber, H. J., Bolin, B., Dickson, N. M., Faucheux, S., Gallopin, G. C., Grubler, A., Huntley, B., Jager, J., Jodha, N. S., Kasperson, R. E., Mabogunje, A., Matson, P., Mooney, H., Moore, B., O'Riordan, T., Svedin, U. 2001; 292 (5517): 641-642

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168478300024

    View details for PubMedID 11330321

  • Policy implications of human-accelerated nitrogen cycling BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Mosier, A. R., Bleken, M. A., Chaiwanakupt, P., Ellis, E. C., Freney, J. R., Howarth, R. B., Matson, P. A., Minami, K., Naylor, R., Weeks, K. N., Zhu, Z. L. 2001; 52 (3): 281-320
  • Earth system science: An integrated approach Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development Steffen, W., Tyson, P., Jager, J., Matson, P., Moore, B., Oldfield, F., Richardson, K., Schellnhuber, J., J., Turner, B., Wasson, R. 2001; 43 (8): 21-27
  • Nitrogen leaching and soil nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium levels under irrigated wheat in Northern Mexico NUTRIENT CYCLING IN AGROECOSYSTEMS Riley, W. J., Ortiz-Monasterio, I., Matson, P. A. 2001; 61 (3): 223-236
  • The atmospheric commons PROTECTING THE COMMONS Harrison, J., Matson, P. 2001: 219-239
  • Matson panel: Questions & answers ECOLOGY LAW QUARTERLY Lee, K. N., Fortmann, L., Matson, P., Guruswamy, L., Beebe, P. 2001; 27 (4): 1251-1260
  • Environmental challenges for the twenty-first century: Interacting challenges and integrative solutions ECOLOGY LAW QUARTERLY Matson, P. 2001; 27 (4): 1179-1190
  • Distinguishing nitrification and denitrification sources of N2O in a Mexican wheat system using N-15 ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Panek, J. A., Matson, P. A., Ortiz-Monasterio, I., Brooks, P. 2000; 10 (2): 506-514
  • NLOSS: A mechanistic model of denitrified N2O and N-2 evolution from soil SOIL SCIENCE Riley, W. J., Matson, P. A. 2000; 165 (3): 237-249
  • Nitrogen oxide emissions after nitrogen additions in tropical forests NATURE Hall, S. J., Matson, P. A. 1999; 400 (6740): 152-155
  • The globalization of N deposition: ecosystem consequences in tropical environments BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Matson, P. A., McDowell, W. H., Townsend, A. R., Vitousek, P. M. 1999; 46 (1-3): 67-83
  • Integration of environmental, agronomic, and economic aspects of fertilizer management SCIENCE Matson, P. A., Naylor, R., Ortiz-Monasterio, I. 1998; 280 (5360): 112-115
  • Within-system element cycles, input-output budgets, and nutrient limitation SUCCESSES, LIMITATIONS, AND FRONTIERS IN ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE Vitousek, P. M., Hedin, L. O., Matson, P. A., Fownes, J. H., Neff, J. 1998: 432-451
  • Human alteration of the global nitrogen cycle: Sources and consequences ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Vitousek, P. M., Aber, J. D., Howarth, R. W., Likens, G. E., Matson, P. A., Schindler, D. W., Schlesinger, W. H., Tilman, D. 1997; 7 (3): 737-750
  • NOx emissions from soils and its consequences for the atmosphere and biosphere Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems Matson, P. 1997; 48: 1-6

    View details for DOI 10.1023/A:1009730430912

  • Agricultural intensification and ecosystem properties Science Matson, P. A., Parton, W. J., Power, A. G., Swift, M. 1997; 277: 504-509
  • Fertilization practices and soil variations control nitrogen oxide emissions from tropical sugar cane JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Matson, P. A., BILLOW, C., Hall, S., Zachariassen, J. 1996; 101 (D13): 18533-18545
  • Process modeling of controls on nitrogen trace gas emissions from soils worldwide JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Potter, C. S., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Davidson, E. A. 1996; 101 (D1): 1361-1377
  • Nitrogen trace gas responses to fertilization in sugar cane ecosystems Journal of Geophysical Research Matson, P. A., Billow, C., Hall, S., Zachariesson, J. 1996; 101: 18533-18546

    View details for DOI 10.1029/96jd01536

  • High spectral resolution reflectance of Douglas-fir grown under different fertilization treatments: experiment design and treatment effects Remote Sensing of Environment Dungan, J. L., Johnson, L. F., Billow, C. R., Matson, P. A., Mazzurco, J., Moen, J., Vanderbilt, V. C. 1996; 55: 217-228
  • NOx emission from soil: implications for air quality modeling in agricultural regions Annual Review of Energy and Environment Hall, S. J., Matson, P. A., Roth, P. 1996; 21: 311-46
  • ECOLOGICAL CONTROLS OVER MONOTERPENE EMISSIONS FROM DOUGLAS-FIR (PSEUDOTSUGA-MENZIESII) ECOLOGY Lerdau, M., Matson, P., Fall, R., Monson, R. 1995; 76 (8): 2640-2647
  • MAPPING THE LAND-SURFACE FOR GLOBAL ATMOSPHERE-BIOSPHERE MODELS - TOWARD CONTINUOUS DISTRIBUTIONS OF VEGETATIONS FUNCTIONAL-PROPERTIES JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES DeFries, R. S., Field, C. B., Fung, I., Justice, C. O., Los, S., Matson, P. A., Matthews, E., Mooney, H. A., Potter, C. S., Prentice, K., Sellers, P. J., Townshend, J. R., Tucker, C. J., Ustin, S. L., Vitousek, P. M. 1995; 100 (D10): 20867-20882
  • ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES - AN IGAC PANEL DISCUSSION GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC-BIOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Crutzen, P., Galbally, I., Matson, P., Rodhe, H., Sanhueza, E., Prinn, R., Zimmerman, P., Brasseur, G., Su, W. H., Lelieveld, J., Akimoto, H. 1994; 48: 249-257
  • Seasonal changes in canopy chemistry across the Oregon Transect: patterns and spectral measurement with remote sensing Ecological Applications Matson, P. A., Johnson, L., Billow, C., Miller, J., Pu, R. 1994; 4: 280-298

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1941934

  • Seasonal biochemical changes in coniferous forest canopies and their response to fertilization Tree Physiology Billow, C., Matson, P., Yoder, B. 1994; 14: 564-574
  • TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION - A PROCESS MODEL-BASED ON GLOBAL SATELLITE AND SURFACE DATA GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES Potter, C. S., Randerson, J. T., Field, C. B., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Mooney, H. A., Klooster, S. A. 1993; 7 (4): 811-841
  • DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED APPROACH FOOD POLICY Naylor, R., Matson, P. 1993; 18 (3): 249-251
  • NUTRIENT LIMITATIONS TO PLANT-GROWTH DURING PRIMARY SUCCESSION IN HAWAII-VOLCANOS-NATIONAL-PARK BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Vitousek, P. M., Walker, L. R., WHITEAKER, L. D., Matson, P. A. 1993; 23 (3): 197-215
  • AGRICULTURE, THE GLOBAL NITROGEN-CYCLE, AND TRACE GAS FLUX BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF GLOBAL CHANGE Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1993: 193-208
  • Food, conservation, and global environmental change: Is compromise possible? Eos Naylor, R., Matson, P. A. 1993; 74: 178-179
  • Statistical methods: An upgrade for ecologists Ecology Matson, P. A., Potvin, C., Travis, J. 1993; 74: 1615-1617

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1939919

  • PROCESSES REGULATING SOIL EMISSIONS OF NO AND N2O IN A SEASONALLY DRY TROPICAL FOREST ECOLOGY Davidson, E. A., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Riley, R., Dunkin, K., GARCIAMENDEZ, G., Maass, J. M. 1993; 74 (1): 130-139
  • TROPICAL FORESTS AND TRACE GASES - POTENTIAL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TROPICAL BIOLOGY AND THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES BIOTROPICA Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1992; 24 (2): 233-239
  • RESPONSES OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS TO THE CHANGING ATMOSPHERE - A RESOURCE-BASED APPROACH ANNUAL REVIEW OF ECOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS Field, C. B., Chapin, F. S., Matson, P. A., Mooney, H. A. 1992; 23: 201-235
  • Soil nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide fluxes in fertilized Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir forests Biogeochemistry Matson, P. A., Gower, S. T., Volkmann, C., BIllow, C., Grier, C. C. 1992; 18: 101-117

    View details for DOI 10.1007/bf00002705

  • Management effects on soil nitrogen transformations in a young loblolly pine plantation Forest Ecology and Management Vitousek, P. M., Andariese, S. W., Matson, P. A., Morris, L., Sanford, R. L. 1992; 49: 277-292
  • The relative contributions of top-down and bottom-up forces in population and community ecology Ecology Matson, P. A., Hunter, M. D. 1992; 73: 723

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1940151

  • Biogeochemistryand perspectives on change Ecology Matson, P. A. 1992; 73: 712-713

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1940783

  • Ratio dependent predator-prey theory Ecology Matson, P. A., Berryman, A. 1992; 73: 1529

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1940004

  • WHAT DOES REMOTE-SENSING DO FOR ECOLOGY ECOLOGY Roughgarden, J., Running, S. W., Matson, P. A. 1991; 72 (6): 1918-1922
  • EFFECTS OF TROPICAL DEFORESTATION ON GLOBAL AND REGIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY - COMMENT CLIMATIC CHANGE Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1991; 19 (1-2): 159-162
  • SOIL EMISSIONS OF NITRIC-OXIDE IN A SEASONALLY DRY TROPICAL FOREST OF MEXICO JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Davidson, E. A., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A., Riley, R., GARCIAMENDEZ, G., Maass, J. M. 1991; 96 (D8): 15439-15445
  • NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS AND NITROUS-OXIDE FLUX IN A TROPICAL DECIDUOUS FOREST IN MEXICO OECOLOGIA GARCIAMENDEZ, G., Maass, J. M., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. 1991; 88 (3): 362-366
  • The sustainable biosphere initiative: An ecological research agenda Ecology Lubchenco, J., Olson, A., Brubaker, L., Carpenter, S., Holland, M., Hubbell, S., Levin, S., MacMahon, J., Matson, P., Melillo, J., Mooney, H., Peterson, C., Pulliam, H., Real, L., Regal, P., Risser, P. 1991; 72: 371-412

    View details for DOI 10.2307/2937183

  • GRADIENT ANALYSIS OF ECOSYSTEMS COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF ECOSYSTEMS Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1991: 287-298
  • The future of remote sensing in ecological studies Ecology Matson, P. A., Usting, S. L. 1991; 72: 1917

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1941545

  • Annual nitrous oxide flux and soil nitrogen characteristics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems Biogeochemistry Matson, P. A., Volkmann, C., Coppinger, K., Reiners, W. A. 1991; 1: 1-12

    View details for DOI 10.1007/bf00000883

  • Interactions of behavioral and evolutionary ecology in changing environments Ecology Gordon, D. M., Matson, P. A. 1991; 72: 1179

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1941090

  • ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO A GLOBAL NITROUS-OXIDE BUDGET BIOSCIENCE Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. 1990; 40 (9): 667-671
  • SOURCES OF VARIATION IN NITROUS-OXIDE FLUX FROM AMAZONIAN ECOSYSTEMS JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Livingston, G. P., SWANBERG, N. A. 1990; 95 (D10): 16789-16798
  • VARIATION IN FOLIAR DELTA-C-13 IN HAWAIIAN METROSIDEROS-POLYMORPHA - A CASE OF INTERNAL RESISTANCE OECOLOGIA Vitousek, P. M., Field, C. B., Matson, P. A. 1990; 84 (3): 362-370
  • The use of urban gradients in ecological studies Ecology Matson, P. A. 1990; 71: 1231

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1938258

  • The Amazon boundary layer experiment: Wet season 1987 Journal of Geophysical Research Harris, R. C., Garstang, M., Wofsy, S. C., Beck, S. M., Bendura, R. J., Coelho, J. R., Drewry, J. W., Hoell, J. M., Matson, P. A., McNeal, J. R., Mollon, L. C., Navarro, R. L., Rabine, V., Snell, R. L. 1990; 95: 16721-16736

    View details for DOI 10.1029/jd095id10p16721

  • Use of the exotic tree Myrica faya by native and exotic birds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Pacific Science Woodward, S., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. 1990; 44: 88-93
  • Plant-soil interactions during primary succession at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Oecologica Matson, P. A. 1990; 85: 241-246

    View details for DOI 10.1007/bf00319408

  • Statistical analysis of ecological response to large-scale perturbabion Ecology Matson, P. A., Carpenter, S. 1990; 71: 2037

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1938616

  • NITROGEN AVAILABILITY AND NITRIFICATION DURING SUCCESSION - PRIMARY, SECONDARY, AND OLD-FIELD SERES PLANT AND SOIL Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A., VANCLEVE, K. 1989; 115 (2): 229-239
  • Nitrous oxide fluxes from seasonally dry tropical forests Global Biogeochemical Cycles Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A., Volkmann, C., Maass, M., Garcia, G. 1989; 3: 375-382

    View details for DOI 10.1029/gb003i004p00375

  • Estimating biogeochemical fluxes across sagaebrush-steppe landscape with thematic mapper imagery Remote Sensing of Environment Reiners, W. A., Strong, L. L., Matson, P. A., Burke, I. C., Ojima, D. S. 1989; 28: 121-129
  • Relationships among soil microbial properties and above ground stand characteristics of conifer forests in Oregon Biogeochemistry Myroid, D. D., Matson, P. A., Peterson, D. L. 1989; 8: 265-281

    View details for DOI 10.1007/bf00002892

  • Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing Global Biogeochemical Cycles Luizao, F., Matson, P., Livingston, G., Luizao, R., Vitousek, P. 1989; 3: 281-285

    View details for DOI 10.1029/gb003i003p00281

  • NITROUS-OXIDE FLUX AND NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS ACROSS A LANDSCAPE GRADIENT IN AMAZONIA JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES Livingston, G. P., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1988; 93 (D2): 1593-1599
  • ELEVATIONAL AND AGE GRADIENTS IN HAWAIIAN MONTANE RAINFOREST - FOLIAR AND SOIL NUTRIENTS OECOLOGIA Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A., Turner, D. R. 1988; 77 (4): 565-570
  • Prediction of leaf chemistry by the use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy Remote Sensing of Environment Card, D. H., Peterson, D. L., Matson, P. A., Aber, J. D. 1988; 26: 123-147
  • Remote sensing of forest canopy and leaf biochemical content Remote Sensing of the Environment Peterson, D. L., Aber, J. D., Matson, P. A., Card, D. J., Swanberg, N., Wessman, C., Spanner, M. A., Hlavka, C. A. 1988; 24: 85-108
  • Aircraft-based measurements of biosphere-atmosphere gas exchange Ecology Matson, P. A., Harriss, R. C. 1988; 69: 1318-1325

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1941629

  • NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS IN A RANGE OF TROPICAL FOREST SOILS SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1988; 20 (3): 361-367
  • EXCHANGE OF MATERIALS BETWEEN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS AND THE ATMOSPHERE SCIENCE Mooney, H. A., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1987; 238 (4829): 926-932

    Abstract

    Many biogenic trace gases are increasing in concentration or flux or both in the atmosphere as a consequence of human activities. Most of these gases have demonstrated or potential effects on atmospheric chemistry, climate, and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Focused studies of the interactions between the atmosphere and the biosphere that regulate trace gases can improve both our understanding of terrestrial ecosystems and our ability to predict regional-and global-scale canges in atmospheric chemistry.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K781000026

    View details for PubMedID 17829357

  • BIOLOGICAL INVASION BY MYRICA-FAYA ALTERS ECOSYSTEM DEVELOPMENT IN HAWAII SCIENCE Vitousek, P. M., Walker, L. R., WHITEAKER, L. D., MUELLERDOMBOIS, D., Matson, P. A. 1987; 238 (4828): 802-804

    Abstract

    The exotic nitrogen-fixing tree Myrica faya invades young volcanic sites where the growth of native plants is limited by a lack of nitrogen. Myrica quadruples the amount of nitrogen entering certain sites and increases the overall biological availability of nitrogen, thereby altering the nature of ecosystem development after volcanic eruptions.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K681000034

    View details for PubMedID 17814707

  • NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS FOLLOWING TROPICAL FOREST FELLING AND BURNING ON A VOLCANIC SOIL ECOLOGY Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Ewel, J. J., Mazzarino, M. J., Robertson, G. P. 1987; 68 (3): 491-502
  • Susceptibility indices in loblolly pine vary with silvicultural treatment Forest Ecology and Management Matson, P. A., Hain, F. P., Mawby, W. 1987; 22: 107-118
  • Dentrification in a clearcut loblolly pine plantation in the Southeastern U.S.: Differences related to harvest intensity, site preparation, and silvicultural practice Plant and Soil Robertson, G. P., Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A., Tiedje, J. M. 1987; 97: 119-129

    View details for DOI 10.1007/bf02149830

  • Ecosystem responses to forest dieback: Decomposition, nutrient availability, and tree vigor Forestry Waring, R. H., Cromack, Jr., I., Matson, P. A., Boone, R. D., Stafford, S. G. 1987; 60: 219-227
  • Cross-system comparisons of soil nitrogen transformationas and nitrous oxide flux in tropical forest ecosystems Global Biogeochemical Cycles Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. 1987; 1: 163-170

    View details for DOI 10.1029/gb001i002p00163

  • Herbicide treatment effects on properties of mountain big sagebrush soils after 14 years Soil Science Society of America Journal Burke, I. C., Reiners, W. A., Sturges, D. L., Matson, P. A. 1987; 51: 1337-1343
  • HUMAN APPROPRIATION OF THE PRODUCTS OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS BIOSCIENCE Vitousek, P. M., Ehrlich, P. R., EHRLICH, A. H., Matson, P. A. 1986; 36 (6): 368-373
  • Site fertility affects seasonal carbon reserves in loblolly pine Tree Physiology Birk, E. M., Matson, P. A. 1986; 2: 17-27
  • DISTURBANCE, NITROGEN AVAILABILITY, AND NITROGEN LOSSES IN AN INTENSIVELY MANAGED LOBLOLLY-PINE PLANTATION ECOLOGY Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1985; 66 (4): 1360-1376
  • Nitrate losses from disturbed forests: Causes of delayed nitrate production in two Indiana forests Forest Science Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1985; 31: 122-131
  • Intensive harvest and site preparation decrease nitrogen availability in young plantations The Southern Journal of Applied Forestry Vitousek, P. M., Matson, PA. 1985; 9: 120-125
  • MECHANISMS OF NITROGEN-RETENTION IN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS - A FIELD EXPERIMENT SCIENCE Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. 1984; 225 (4657): 51-52

    Abstract

    Intensive forest management led to elevated losses of nitrogen from a recently harvested loblolly pine plantation in North Carolina. Measurements of nitrogen-15 retention in the field demonstrated that microbial uptake of nitrogen during the decomposition of residual organic material was the most important process retaining nitrogen. Management practices that remove this material cause increased losses of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SX61000030

    View details for PubMedID 17775660

  • Natural Disturbance and Nitrogen Mineralization: Wave-Form Dieback of Mountain Hemlock in the Oregon Cascades Ecology Matson, P. A., Boone, R. D. 1984; 65: 1511-1516

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1939130

  • Effects of nutrient and light limitation on mountain hemlock: Susceptibility to laminated root rot Ecology Matson, P. A., Waring, R. H. 1984; 65: 1517-1524

    View details for DOI 10.2307/1939131

  • An evaluation of an ion exchange resin bag method for assessing forest soil nitrogen availability Soil Science Society of America Journal Binkley, D., Matson, P. A. 1983; 47: 1050-1052
  • Nitrogen mineralization and nitrification potentials following clearcutting in the Hoosier National Forest, Indiana Forest Science Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. 1981; 27: 781-791

Books and Book Chapters


  • Agricultural Nutrient Use and Its Environmental Consequences The Evolving Sphere of Food Security Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. edited by Naylor, R. L. Oxford University Press. 2014: 269-285
  • From Global Environmental Change to Sustainability Science: Ecosystem Studies in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico Fundamentals of Ecosystem Science Matson, P. A. edited by Weathers, K. C., Strayer, D. L., Likens, G. E. Academic Press, Elsevier. 2013: 233-241
  • Seeds of Sustainability: Lessons from the Birthplace of the Green Revolution in Agriculture edited by Matson, P. A. Island Press, Washington DC. 2012
  • Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology Chapin III, F. S., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. Springer: New York. 2011

    View details for DOI 10.1007/b97397

  • America's Climate Choices: Advancing the Science of Climate Change National Research Council of the National Academies Committee (Matson, co-chair) Matson, P. A. National Aacademy Press, Washington, DC. 2010
  • Nutrient Cycling and Biogeochemistry Princeton Guide to Ecology Vitousek, P. M., Matson, P. A. edited by Levin, S. A. Princeton University Press. 2009
  • People, land use and environment in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico Population, Land Use, and Environment Matson, P., Luers, A., Seto, K., Naylor, R., Ortiz-Monasterio, I. edited by Entwisle, B., Stern, P. National Research Council, Washington, DC. 2005: 238-264
  • Environmental variables controlling trace gas emissions from forests: Acid Precipitation and Nitrogen Deposition Trace Gas Exchange in Forest Ecosystems Hall, S. J., Matson, P. A. edited by Papen, H., Gasche, R., Rennenberg, H. Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands. 2002: 279-306
  • Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology Chapin, F. S., Matson, P. A., Mooney, H. A. Springer-Verlag, New York. 2002
  • Land use change: Global effects of local changes Earth System Science: Patterns and Processes Schuur, E. G., Matson, P. A. edited by Ernst, W. G. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK. 2001
  • Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis Prather, M., Ehhalt, D., Dentener, F., Derwent, R., Dlugokencky, E., Holland, E., Isaksen, I., Katima, J., Kirchoff, V., Matson, P., Midgely, P., Want, M. edited by Houghton et al Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. 2001
  • Biogenic Trace Gas Exchange Methods in Ecosystem Science Matson, P. A., Goldstein, A. edited by Sala, O., Jackson, R., Mooney, H., Howarth, R. Springer-Verlag, New York. 2000
  • Confronting climate change in California: Ecological impacts on the Golden State Field, C. B., Dailey, G. C., Davis, F. W., Gaines, S., Matson, P. A., Melack, J., Miller, N. L. Union of Concerned Scientists, Cambridge, MA and Ecological Society of America, Washington, DC. 1999
  • Our Common Journey: A transition toward sustainability National Research Council Board on Sustainable Development Matson et al, P. A. National Academy Press, Washington, DC. 1999
  • Trace gas emissions in a tropical deciduous forest ecosystem Tropical Deciduous Forest Ecosystems Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Bullock, R. edited by Mooney, H., Medina, C. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1996
  • Biogenic Trace gases: Measuring Emissions from Soil and Water edited by Matson, P. A., Harriss, R. C. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Cambridge, UK. 1995
  • Evaluation of soild database attributes in a terrestrial carbon cycle model: implications for global change research Environmental Systems Analysis Potter, C. S., Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. edited by Michener, W. K. Taylor and Francis, UK. 1994
  • Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of trace gases in the tropics: Evaluating the effects of land use change Global Atmospheric-Biospheric Chemistry Keller, M., Matson, P. A. edited by Prinn, R. Plenum Press, New York. 1994
  • Prospects for Scaling Scaling Physiological Properties Caldwell, M., Matson, P. A., Wessman, C. A., Gamon, J. A. edited by Field, C., Ehlringer, J. Academic Press, New York. 1993: 223-229
  • Trace gas emissions by plants: A summary Trace Gas Emission by Plants Matson, P. A. edited by Sharkey, T., Holland, E., Mooney, H. A. Academic Press, San Diego, CA. 1991: 341-343
  • Remote sensing and trace gas fluxes Remote Sensing of Biosphere Functioning Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M. edited by Hobbs, R., Mooney, H. A. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1990: 157-167
  • Terrestrial Biosphere Exchange with Global Atmospheric Chemistry edited by Matson, P. A., Ojima, D. S. IGBP Report No. 13. Stockholm 103pp.. 1990
  • Regional extrapolation of trace gas flux based on soils and ecosystems Exchange of Trace Gases Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere Matson, P. A., Vitousek, P. M., Schimel, D. S. edited by Andreae, M. D., Schimel, D. S. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1989: 97-108
  • Factors contributing to southern pine beetle host resistance Integrated Pest Management Research Symposium Hain, F. P., Cook, S. P., Matson, P. A., Wilson, K. G. edited by Branham, S. J., Thatcher, R. C. 1985

Conference Proceedings


  • The globalization of nitrogen deposition: Consequences for terrestrial ecosystems Matson, P., Lohse, K. A., Hall, S. J. ROYAL SWEDISH ACAD SCIENCES. 2002: 113-119

    Abstract

    The sources and distribution of anthropogenic nitrogen (N), including N fertilization and N fixed during fossil-fuel combustion, are rapidly becoming globally distributed. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems to anthropogenic N inputs are likely to vary geographically. In the temperate zone, long-term N inputs can lead to increases in plant growth and also can result in over-enrichment with N, eventually leading to increased losses of N via solution leaching and trace-gas emissions, and in some cases, to changes in species composition and to ecosystem decline. However, not all ecosystems respond to N deposition similarly; their response depends on factors such as successional state, ecosystem type, N demand or retention capacity, land-use history, soils, topography, climate, and the rate, timing, and type of N deposition. We point to some of the conditions under which anthropogenic impacts can be significant, some of the factors that control variations in response, and some areas where uncertainty is large due to limited information.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000175937500009

    View details for PubMedID 12077999

  • Mangrove biodiversity and ecosystem function Field, C. B., Osborn, J. G., Hoffmann, L. L., Polsenberg, J. F., Ackerly, D. D., Berry, J. A., Bjorkman, O., Held, Z., Matson, P. A., Mooney, H. A. WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC. 1998: 3-14
  • Nitrogen fertilizer management: consequences for N2O and NO emissions in Mexican irrigated wheat 9th Nitrogen Workshop, Technische Universit, Braunschweig, Germany, Ortiz-Monasterio, J. I., Matson, P. A., Panek, J., Naylor, R. L. 1995: 513-534
  • Biogeochemical Cycling in Sagebrush Ecosystems Thematic Mapper Research in the Earth Sciences Workshop Matson, P. A., Strong, L. L., Reiners, W. A. 1987: 85-90
  • The use of airborne imaging spectrometer data to determine experimentally-induced variation in coniferous canopy chemistry Third Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data Analysis Workshop Swanberg, N. A., Matson, P. A. 1987: 70-74 70-74
  • Biogeochemical processes in sagebrush ecosystems Thematic Mapper Research in Earth Sciences Workshop Matson, P. A. 1986: 279-293
  • High resolution spectrometry of leaf and canopy chemistry for biogeochemical cycling Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data Analsysis Symposium, Spanner, M. A., Peterson, D. L., Acevedo, W., Matson, P. A. 1985
  • Impacts of management practices on soil nitrogen status (in 'Maintaining Site Productivity in Pine Plantation Management') Appalachian Society of American Foresters Ann Mtg Vitousek, P. M., Allen, H. L., Matson, P. A. 1983: 25-39
  • Host conifer defense strategies: A hypothesis First IUFRO Conference on the Role of Host-Pest Interaction in the Population Dynamics of Forest Insects Matson, P. A., Hain, F. P. 1983