Bio


Ran Abramitzky is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University. His research is in economic history and applied microeconomics, with focus on immigration and income inequality. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He is the vice chair of the economics department, and the co-editor of Explorations in Economic History. He was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, as well as National Science Foundation grants for research on the causes and consequences of income inequality and on international migration. His book, The Mystery of the Kibbutz: Egalitarian Principles in a Capitalist World (Princeton University Press, 2018) was awarded by the Economic History Association the Gyorgi Ranki Biennial Prize for an outstanding book on European Economic History. He has received the Economics Department’s and the Dean’s Awards for Distinguished Teaching. He holds a PhD in economics from Northwestern University.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) (2015 - Present)
  • Vice Chair, Economics Department, Stanford (2014 - Present)
  • Faculty Senate, Stanford (2014 - 2016)
  • Associate Professor, Associate Professor (2013 - Present)
  • Research Associate, National Bureau ofEconomic Research (NBER) (2013 - Present)
  • Stanford Faculty Scholar, Stanford (2013 - 2014)
  • Research Fellow, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (2012 - 2012)
  • Faculty Research Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) (2011 - 2013)
  • Faculty Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) (2007 - 2015)
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Stanford University (2005 - 2013)
  • Dissertation Fellowship, Crown Family Center for Jewish Studies, Northwestern (2004 - 2005)
  • Teaching Assistant Fellow, Searle Center for Teaching Excellence, Northwestern (2004 - 2005)
  • Teaching Assistant, Northwestern University, MMSS program (2003 - Present)
  • Dissertation Fellowship, Northwestern University (2003 - 2004)
  • Graduate Research Fellowship, Northwestern University (2003 - 2003)
  • Teaching Assistant, Northwestern University, Department of Economics (2000 - 2003)
  • University Fellowship, Northwestern University (1999 - 2000)
  • Rector's Fellowship, School of Business Administration, Hebrew University (1998 - 1999)
  • Teaching Assistant, Hebrew University, Department of Economics (1997 - 1999)

Honors & Awards


  • Ranki Biennial Prize for the best book in European Economic History in 2018/2019, Economic History Association (2019)
  • Excellence in Refereeing Award, American Economic Review (2016)
  • Excellence in Refereeing Award, American Economic Review (2013)
  • Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching, Stanford University (2012)
  • Excellence in Refereeing Award, Quarterly Journal of Economics (2012)
  • Economics Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, Stanford University (2009)
  • Alexander Gerschenkron Prize for the best dissertation in economic history, Economiq History Association (2006)
  • Dissertation Award, Economic History Association (2004)
  • Pre-Dissertation Award, Economic History Association (2003)
  • Teaching Assistant Awards, Northwestern University (2001)
  • Teaching Assistant Awards, Northwestern University (2002)
  • Teaching Assistant Awards, Northwestern University (2003)
  • Department of Economics Award, Hebrew University (1998-1999)
  • Program for Outstanding Students, Economics Department, Hebrew University (1996-1999)
  • Dean's List, Hebrew University (1996)
  • Dean's List, Hebrew University (1997)
  • Dean's List,, Hebrew University (1998)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Scientific Committee, World Bank and the Center for Global Development, conferences on Migration and Development (2012 - Present)
  • Co-editor, Explorations in Economic History (2015 - Present)
  • Member, Committee on education in economic history, Economic History Association (2013 - 2016)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Economic History (2013 - 2017)
  • Co-director, Summer Institute for High School Economics Teachers (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Program Committee, European Economic Association (EEA) annual meetings (2013 - 2013)
  • Member, Program Committee, Economic History Association (EHA)annual meetings (2012 - 2012)
  • Member, Program Committee, World Bank and the Center for Global Development, 5th Int'l Conf. on Migration and Development (2013 - 2013)
  • Economic History Association (EHA) Representative to the Allied Social Science Association (ASSA), Economic History Association (2009 - 2011)
  • Referee, American Economic Review
  • Referee, Quarterly Journal of economics
  • Referee, Econometrica
  • Referee, Journal of Political Economy
  • Referee, Review of Economic Studies
  • Referee, Journal of Economic History
  • Referee, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics
  • Referee, American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics
  • Referee, Review of Economics and Statistics
  • Referee, International Economic Review
  • Referee, Journal of Public Economics
  • Referee, Journal of Labor Economics
  • Referee, Journal of Development Economics
  • Referee, Journal of Human Resources
  • Referee, Economic Journal
  • Referee, Journal of European Economic Association
  • Referee, Games and Economic Behavior
  • Referee, Demography
  • Referee, Journal of Population Economics
  • Referee, Journal of Comparative Economics
  • Referee, Population and Development
  • Referee, Review
  • Referee, Population Research and Policy Review
  • Referee, B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy
  • Referee, Scandinavian Journal of Economics
  • Referee, Economic Development and Cultural Change
  • Referee, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics
  • Referee, Economic Quarterly [Hebrew}
  • Referee, National Science Foundation
  • Referee, Israel Science Foundation
  • Referee, Falk Institute
  • Job Market Placement Officer, Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Member, Undergraduate Policy Committee, Stanford University (2012 - 2013)
  • Transfer Credit Policy, Stanford University (2012 - 2013)
  • Member, Graduate Admission Committee, Stanford University (2006 - 2007)
  • Member, Junior Recruiting Committee, Stanford University (2005 - 2006)

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Northwestern University, Economics (2005)
  • M.A., Northwestern University, Economics (2000)
  • B.A, Hebrew University, Israel, Economics and Business (1998)

2019-20 Courses


Stanford Advisees


  • Doctoral Dissertation Reader (AC)
    Yiming He, Hugh Xiaolong Wu
  • Doctoral Dissertation Advisor (AC)
    Chris Becker, Joshua Kim, Tom Zohar
  • Doctoral Dissertation Co-Advisor (AC)
    Jonas Mueller-Gastell

All Publications


  • To the New World and Back Again: Return Migrants in the Age of Mass Migration ILR REVIEW Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L., Eriksson, K. 2019; 72 (2): 300–322
  • To the New World and Back Again: Return Migrants in the Age of Mass Migration Industrial and Labor Relations Review Abramitzky , R., Boustan, L., Eriksson, K. 2018
  • Immigration in American Economic History JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. 2017; 55 (4): 1311–45

    Abstract

    The United States has long been perceived as a land of opportunity for immigrants. Yet, both in the past and today, US natives have expressed concern that immigrants fail to integrate into US society and lower wages for existing workers. This paper reviews the literatures on historical and contemporary migrant flows, yielding new insights on migrant selection, assimilation of immigrants into US economy and society, and the effect of immigration on the labor market.

    View details for PubMedID 29398723

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5794227

  • Economics and the Modern Economic Historian Journal of Economic History Abramitzky , R. 2015; 75:4: 1240-1251
  • BOOK TRANSLATIONS AS IDEA FLOWS: THE EFFECTS OF THE COLLAPSE OF COMMUNISM ON THE DIFFUSION OF KNOWLEDGE JOURNAL OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION Abramitzky, R., Sin, I. 2014; 12 (6): 1453-1520

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jeea.12093

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345595500002

  • HOW RESPONSIVE IS INVESTMENT IN SCHOOLING TO CHANGES IN REDISTRIBUTIVE POLICIES AND IN RETURNS? ECONOMETRICA Abramitzky, R., Lavy, V. 2014; 82 (4): 1241-1272

    View details for DOI 10.3982/ECTA10763

    View details for Web of Science ID 000339965100002

  • A Nation of Immigrants: Assimilation and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration JOURNAL OF POLITICAL ECONOMY Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2014; 122 (3): 467-506

    View details for DOI 10.1086/675805

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337737600001

  • A Nation of Immigrants: Assimilation and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration. The journal of political economy Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2014; 122 (3): 467–506

    Abstract

    During the Age of Mass Migration (1850-1913), the United States maintained an open border, absorbing 30 million European immigrants. Prior cross-sectional work finds that immigrants initially held lower-paid occupations than natives but converged over time. In newly assembled panel data, we show that, in fact, the average immigrant did not face a substantial occupation-based earnings penalty upon first arrival and experienced occupational advancement at the same rate as natives. Cross-sectional patterns are driven by biases from declining arrival cohort skill level and departures of negatively selected return migrants. We show that assimilation patterns vary substantially across sending countries and persist in the second generation.

    View details for PubMedID 26609186

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4655828

  • How Responsive is Investment in Schooling to Changes in Redistribution Policies and in Returns? Econometrica Abramitzky, R., Levy, V. 2014; 82 (4): 1241–1272
  • Have the poor always been less likely to migrate? Evidence from inheritance practices during the age of mass migration JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2013; 102: 2-14
  • Have the poor always been less likely to migrate? Evidence from inheritance practices during the age of mass migration. Journal of development economics Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2013; 102: 2–14

    Abstract

    Using novel data on 50,000 Norwegian men, we study the effect of wealth on the probability of internal or international migration during the Age of Mass Migration (1850-1913), a time when the US maintained an open border to European immigrants. We do so by exploiting variation in parental wealth and in expected inheritance by birth order, gender composition of siblings, and region. We find that wealth discouraged migration in this era, suggesting that the poor could be more likely to move if migration restrictions were lifted today. We discuss the implications of these historical findings to developing countries.

    View details for PubMedID 26609192

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4655887

  • ON THE OPTIMALITY OF LINE CALL CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL TENNIS INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC REVIEW Abramitzky, R., Einav, L., Kolkowitz, S., Mill, R. 2012; 53 (3): 939-963
  • Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2012; 102 (5): 1832-1856
  • Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration. The American economic review Abramitzky, R., Boustan, L. P., Eriksson, K. 2012; 102 (5): 1832–56

    Abstract

    During the age of mass migration (1850-1913), one of the largest migration episodes in history, the United States maintained a nearly open border, allowing the study of migrant decisions unhindered by entry restrictions. We estimate the return to migration while accounting for migrant selection by comparing Norway-to-US migrants with their brothers who stayed in Norway in the late nineteenth century. We also compare fathers of migrants and nonmigrants by wealth and occupation. We find that the return to migration was relatively low (70 percent) and that migrants from urban areas were negatively selected from the sending population. "Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"--Emma Lazarus (1883).

    View details for PubMedID 26594052

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4651453

  • Marrying Up: The Role of Sex Ratio in Assortative Matching AMERICAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL-APPLIED ECONOMICS Abramitzky, R., Delavande, A., Vasconcelos, L. 2011; 3 (3): 124-157
  • Lessons from the Kibbutz on the Equality-Incentives Trade-off JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES Abramitzky, R. 2011; 25 (1): 185-207
  • On the (lack of) Stability of Communes: An Economic Perspective Oxford Handbook of the Economics ofReligion Abramitzky, R. edited by McCleary, R. Oxford University Press. 2011: 169–189
  • Risk, Incentives, and Contracts: Partnerships in Rio de Janeiro, 1870-1891 JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC HISTORY Abramitzky, R., Frank, Z., Mahajan, A. 2010; 70 (3): 686-715
  • Is Hanukkah Responsive to Christmas?* ECONOMIC JOURNAL Abramitzky, R., Einav, L., Rigbi, O. 2010; 120 (545): 612-630
  • The effect of redistribution on migration: Evidence from the Israeli kibbutz JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ECONOMICS Abramitzky, R. 2009; 93 (3-4): 498-511
  • The limits of equality: Insights from the Israeli kibbutz QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS Abramitzky, R. 2008; 123 (3): 1111-1159
  • The limits of equality: Insights from the Israeli Kibbutz Abramitzky, R. CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS. 2007: 527–27
  • Migration and human capital: Self-selection of indentured servants to the Americas JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC HISTORY Abramitzky, R., Braggion, F. 2006; 66 (4): 882-905
  • Vanderbilt Family Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History Abramitzky, R. Oxford University Press. 2004
  • "Du Pont Family", "Kettering Charles", "Lenin Vladimir Ilich", "Lewis John L.", "Malthusian and neo-Malthusian Theories" Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History Abramitzky, R., Braggion, F. Oxford University Press. 2004