All Publications


  • The impact of osteoporosis on adult deformity surgery outcomes in Medicare patients. European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society Varshneya, K., Bhattacharjya, A., Jokhai, R. T., Fatemi, P., Medress, Z. A., Stienen, M. N., Ho, A. L., Ratliff, J. K., Veeravagu, A. 2021

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the impact of osteoporosis (OS) on postoperative outcomes in Medicare patients undergoing ASD surgery.BACKGROUND: Patients with OP and advanced age experience higher than average rates of ASD. However, poor bone density could undermine the durability of a deformity correction.METHODS: We queried the MarketScan Medicare Supplemental database to identify patients Medicare patients who underwent ASD surgery from 2007 to 2016.RESULTS: A total of 2564 patients met the inclusion criteria of this study, of whom n=971 (61.0%) were diagnosed with osteoporosis. Patients with OP had a similar 90-day postoperative complication rates (OP: 54.6% vs. non-OP: 49.2%, p=0.0076, not significant after multivariate regression correction). This was primarily driven by posthemorrhagic anemia (37.6% in OP, vs. 33.1% in non-OP). Rates of revision surgery were similar at 90days (non-OP 15.0%, OP 16.8%), but by 2years, OP patients had a significantly higher reoperation rate (30.4% vs. 22.9%, p<0.0001). In multivariate regression analysis, OP increased odds for revision surgery at 1year (OR 1.4) and 2years (OR 1.5) following surgery (all p<0.05). OP was also an independent predictor of readmission at all time points (90days, OR 1.3, p<0.005).CONCLUSION: Medicare patients with OP had elevated rates of complications, reoperations, and outpatient costs after undergoing primary ASD surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00586-021-06985-z

    View details for PubMedID 34655336

  • Factors which predict adverse events following surgery in adults with cervical spinal deformity BONE & JOINT JOURNAL Varshneya, K., Jokhai, R., Medress, Z. A., Stienen, M. N., Ho, A., Fatemi, P., Ratliff, J. K., Veeravagu, A. 2021; 103B (4): 734–38
  • Factors which predict adverse events following surgery in adults with cervical spinal deformity. The bone & joint journal Varshneya, K., Jokhai, R., Medress, Z. A., Stienen, M. N., Ho, A., Fatemi, P., Ratliff, J. K., Veeravagu, A. 2021; 103-B (4): 734–38

    Abstract

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for adverse events following the surgical correction of cervical spinal deformities in adults.METHODS: We identified adult patients who underwent corrective cervical spinal surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2015 from the MarketScan database. The baseline comorbidities and characteristics of the operation were recorded. Adverse events were defined as the development of a complication, an unanticipated deleterious postoperative event, or further surgery. Patients aged < 18 years and those with a previous history of tumour or trauma were excluded from the study.RESULTS: A total of 13,549 adults in the database underwent primary corrective surgery for a cervical spinal deformity during the study period. A total of 3,785 (27.9%) had a complication within 90 days of the procedure, and 3,893 (28.7%) required further surgery within two years. In multivariate analysis, male sex (odds ratio (OR) 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 0.9); p = 0.019) and a posterior approach (compared with a combined surgical approach, OR 0.66 (95% CI 0.5 to 0.8); p < 0.001) significantly decreased the risk of complications. Osteoporosis (OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.6); p < 0.001), dyspnoea (OR 1.48 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.6); p < 0.001), cerebrovascular accident (OR 1.81 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0); p < 0.001), a posterior approach (compared with an anterior approach, OR 1.23 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.4); p < 0.001), and the use of bone morphogenic protein (BMP) (OR 1.22 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.4); p = 0.003) significantly increased the risks of 90-day complications. In multivariate regression analysis, preoperative dyspnoea (OR 1.50 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.7); p < 0.001), a posterior approach (compared with an anterior approach, OR 2.80 (95% CI 2.4 to 3.2; p < 0.001), and postoperative dysphagia (OR 2.50 (95% CI 1.8 to 3.4); p < 0.001) were associated with a significantly increased risk of further surgery two years postoperatively. A posterior approach (compared with a combined approach, OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.3 to 0.4); p < 0.001), the use of BMP (OR 0.48 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.5); p < 0.001) were associated with a significantly decreased risk of further surgery at this time.CONCLUSION: The surgical approach and intraoperative use of BMP strongly influence the risk of further surgery, whereas the comorbidity burden and the characteristics of the operation influence the rates of early complications in adult patients undergoing corrective cervical spinal surgery. These data may aid surgeons in patient selection and surgical planning. Cite this article: Bone Joint J2021;103-B(4):734-738.

    View details for DOI 10.1302/0301-620X.103B4.BJJ-2020-0845.R2

    View details for PubMedID 33789479

  • Predictors of 2-year reoperation in Medicare patients undergoing primary thoracolumbar deformity surgery. Journal of neurosurgery. Spine Varshneya, K., Jokhai, R. T., Fatemi, P., Stienen, M. N., Medress, Z. A., Ho, A. L., Ratliff, J. K., Veeravagu, A. 2020: 1–5

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: This was a retrospective cohort study in which the authors used a nationally representative administrative database. Their goal was to identify the risk factors for reoperation in Medicare patients undergoing primary thoracolumbar adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. Previous literature reports estimate that 20% of patients undergoing thoracolumbar ASD correction undergo revision surgery within 2 years. Most published data discuss risk factors for revision surgery in the general population, but these have not been explored specifically in the Medicare population.METHODS: Using the MarketScan Medicare Supplemental database, the authors identified patients who were diagnosed with a spinal deformity and underwent ASD surgery between 2007 and 2015. The interactions of patient demographics, surgical factors, and medical factors with revision surgery were investigated during the 2 years following primary ASD surgery. The authors excluded patients without Medicare insurance and those with any prior history of trauma or tumor.RESULTS: Included in the data set were 2564 patients enrolled in Medicare who underwent ASD surgery between 2007 and 2015. The mean age at diagnosis with spinal deformity was 71.5 years. A majority of patients (68.5%) were female. Within 2 years of follow-up, 661 (25.8%) patients underwent reoperation. Preoperative osteoporosis (OR 1.58, p < 0.0001), congestive heart failure (OR 1.35, p = 0.0161), and paraplegia (OR 2.41, p < 0.0001) independently increased odds of revision surgery. The use of intraoperative bone morphogenetic protein was protective against reoperation (OR 0.71, p = 0.0371). Among 90-day postoperative complications, a wound complication was the strongest predictor of undergoing repeat surgery (OR 2.85, p = 0.0061). The development of a pulmonary embolism also increased the odds of repeat surgery (OR 1.84, p = 0.0435).CONCLUSIONS: Approximately one-quarter of Medicare patients with ASD who underwent surgery required an additional spinal surgery within 2 years. Baseline comorbidities such as osteoporosis, congestive heart failure, and paraplegia, as well as short-term complications such as pulmonary embolism and wound complications significantly increased the odds of repeat surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.3171/2020.5.SPINE191425

    View details for PubMedID 32707541