All Publications


  • Health and Economic Outcomes of Posterior Spinal Fusion for Children With Neuromuscular Scoliosis. Hospital pediatrics Lin, J. L., Tawfik, D. S., Gupta, R., Imrie, M., Bendavid, E., Owens, D. K. 2020

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: Neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) can result in severe disability. Nonoperative management minimally slows scoliosis progression, but operative management with posterior spinal fusion (PSF) carries high risks of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we compare health and economic outcomes of PSF to nonoperative management for children with NMS to identify opportunities to improve care.METHODS: We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis. Our decision analytic model included patients aged 5 to 20 years with NMS and a Cobb angle ≥50°, with a base case of 15-year-old patients. We estimated costs, life expectancy, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness from published literature and conducted sensitivity analyses on all model inputs.RESULTS: We estimated that PSF resulted in modestly decreased discounted life expectancy (10.8 years) but longer quality-adjusted life expectancy (4.84 QALYs) than nonoperative management (11.2 years; 3.21 QALYs). PSF costs $75400 per patient. Under base-case assumptions, PSF costs $50100 per QALY gained. Our findings were sensitive to quality of life (QoL) and life expectancy, with PSF favored if it significantly increased QoL.CONCLUSIONS: In patients with NMS, whether PSF is cost-effective depends strongly on the degree to which QoL improved, with larger improvements when NMS is the primary cause of debility, but limited data on QoL and life expectancy preclude a definitive assessment. Improved patient-centered outcome assessments are essential to understanding the effectiveness of NMS treatment alternatives. Because the degree to which PSF influences QoL substantially impacts health outcomes and varies by patient, clinicians should consider shared decision-making during PSF-related consultations.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/hpeds.2019-0153

    View details for PubMedID 32079619

  • COMPARISON OF WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION AND DEMOGRAPHIC AND HEALTH SURVEY DATA TO ESTIMATE SUB-NATIONAL DEWORMING COVERAGE IN PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN Lo, N. C., Gupta, R., Addiss, D. G., Bendavid, E., Heft-Neal, S., Mikhailov, A., Montresor, A., Mbabazi, P. AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE. 2019: 616
  • Gender norms and health: insights from global survey data. Lancet (London, England) Weber, A. M., Cislaghi, B., Meausoone, V., Abdalla, S., Mejía-Guevara, I., Loftus, P., Hallgren, E., Seff, I., Stark, L., Victora, C. G., Buffarini, R., Barros, A. J., Domingue, B. W., Bhushan, D., Gupta, R., Nagata, J. M., Shakya, H. B., Richter, L. M., Norris, S. A., Ngo, T. D., Chae, S., Haberland, N., McCarthy, K., Cullen, M. R., Darmstadt, G. L. 2019

    Abstract

    Despite global commitments to achieving gender equality and improving health and wellbeing for all, quantitative data and methods to precisely estimate the effect of gender norms on health inequities are underdeveloped. Nonetheless, existing global, national, and subnational data provide some key opportunities for testing associations between gender norms and health. Using innovative approaches to analysing proxies for gender norms, we generated evidence that gender norms impact the health of women and men across life stages, health sectors, and world regions. Six case studies showed that: (1) gender norms are complex and can intersect with other social factors to impact health over the life course; (2) early gender-normative influences by parents and peers can have multiple and differing health consequences for girls and boys; (3) non-conformity with, and transgression of, gender norms can be harmful to health, particularly when they trigger negative sanctions; and (4) the impact of gender norms on health can be context-specific, demanding care when designing effective gender-transformative health policies and programmes. Limitations of survey-based data are described that resulted in missed opportunities for investigating certain populations and domains. Recommendations for optimising and advancing research on the health impacts of gender norms are made.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30765-2

    View details for PubMedID 31155273

  • Comparison of Strategies and Incidence Thresholds for Vi Conjugate Vaccines Against Typhoid Fever: A Cost-effectiveness Modeling Study JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Lo, N. C., Gupta, R., Stanaway, J. D., Garrett, D. O., Bogoch, I. I., Luby, S. P., Andrews, J. R. 2018; 218: S232–S242
  • Comparison of Strategies and Incidence Thresholds for Vi Conjugate Vaccines Against Typhoid Fever: A Cost-effectiveness Modeling Study. The Journal of infectious diseases Lo, N. C., Gupta, R., Stanaway, J. D., Garrett, D. O., Bogoch, I. I., Luby, S. P., Andrews, J. R. 2018

    Abstract

    Typhoid fever remains a major public health problem globally. While new Vi conjugate vaccines hold promise for averting disease, the optimal programmatic delivery remains unclear. We aimed to identify the strategies and associated epidemiologic conditions under which Vi conjugate vaccines would be cost-effective.We developed a dynamic, age-structured transmission and cost-effectiveness model that simulated multiple vaccination strategies with a typhoid Vi conjugate vaccine from a societal perspective. We simulated 10-year vaccination programs with (1) routine immunization of infants (aged <1 year) through the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) and (2) routine immunization of infants through the EPI plus a 1-time catch-up campaign in school-aged children (aged 5-14 years). In the base case analysis, we assumed a 0.5% case-fatality rate for all cases of clinically symptomatic typhoid fever and defined strategies as highly cost-effective by using the definition of a low-income country (defined as a country with a gross domestic product of $1045 per capita). We defined incidence as the true number of clinically symptomatic people in the population per year.Vi conjugate typhoid vaccines were highly cost-effective when administered by routine immunization activities through the EPI in settings with an annual incidence of >50 cases/100000 (95% uncertainty interval, 40-75 cases) and when administered through the EPI plus a catch-up campaign in settings with an annual incidence of >130 cases/100000 (95% uncertainty interval, 50-395 cases). The incidence threshold was sensitive to the typhoid-related case-fatality rate, carrier contribution to transmission, vaccine characteristics, and country-specific economic threshold for cost-effectiveness.Typhoid Vi conjugate vaccines would be highly cost-effective in low-income countries in settings of moderate typhoid incidence (50 cases/100000 annually). These results were sensitive to case-fatality rates, underscoring the need to consider factors contributing to typhoid mortality (eg, healthcare access and antimicrobial resistance) in the global vaccination strategy.

    View details for PubMedID 29444257

  • COMPARISON OF STRATEGIES AND THRESHOLDS FOR VI CONJUGATE VACCINES AGAINST TYPHOID FEVER: A COST-EFFECTIVENESS MODELING STUDY Lo, N. C., Gupta, R., Stanaway, J. D., Garrett, D. O., Bogoch, I. I., Luby, S. P., Andrews, J. R. AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE. 2017: 617