Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (2018)
  • Master of Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (2012)
  • Bachelor of Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (2010)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Young CSF restores oligodendrogenesis and memory in aged mice via Fgf17. Nature Iram, T., Kern, F., Kaur, A., Myneni, S., Morningstar, A. R., Shin, H., Garcia, M. A., Yerra, L., Palovics, R., Yang, A. C., Hahn, O., Lu, N., Shuken, S. R., Haney, M. S., Lehallier, B., Iyer, M., Luo, J., Zetterberg, H., Keller, A., Zuchero, J. B., Wyss-Coray, T. 2022

    Abstract

    Recent understanding of how the systemic environment shapes the brain throughout life has led to numerous intervention strategies to slow brain ageing1-3. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) makes up the immediate environment of brain cells, providing them with nourishing compounds4,5. We discovered that infusing young CSF directly into aged brains improves memory function. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus identified oligodendrocytes to be most responsive to this rejuvenated CSF environment. We further showed that young CSF boosts oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation and differentiation in the aged hippocampus and in primary OPC cultures. Using SLAMseq to metabolically label nascent mRNA, we identified serum response factor (SRF), a transcription factor that drives actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, as a mediator of OPC proliferation following exposure to young CSF. With age, SRF expression decreases in hippocampal OPCs, and the pathway is induced by acute injection with young CSF. We screened for potential SRF activators in CSF and found that fibroblast growth factor 17 (Fgf17) infusion is sufficient to induce OPC proliferation and long-term memory consolidation in aged mice while Fgf17 blockade impairs cognition in young mice. These findings demonstrate the rejuvenating power of young CSF and identify Fgf17 as a key target to restore oligodendrocyte function in the ageing brain.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-022-04722-0

    View details for PubMedID 35545674

  • Molecular hallmarks of heterochronic parabiosis at single-cell resolution. Nature Palovics, R., Keller, A., Schaum, N., Tan, W., Fehlmann, T., Borja, M., Kern, F., Bonanno, L., Calcuttawala, K., Webber, J., McGeever, A., Tabula Muris Consortium, Luo, J., Pisco, A. O., Karkanias, J., Neff, N. F., Darmanis, S., Quake, S. R., Wyss-Coray, T., Almanzar, N., Antony, J., Baghel, A. S., Bakerman, I., Bansal, I., Barres, B. A., Beachy, P. A., Berdnik, D., Bilen, B., Brownfield, D., Cain, C., Chan, C. K., Chen, M. B., Clarke, M. F., Conley, S. D., Demers, A., Demir, K., de Morree, A., Divita, T., du Bois, H., Ebadi, H., Espinoza, F. H., Fish, M., Gan, Q., George, B. M., Gillich, A., Gomez-Sjoberg, R., Green, F., Genetiano, G., Gu, X., Gulati, G. S., Hahn, O., Haney, M. S., Hang, Y., Harris, L., He, M., Hosseinzadeh, S., Huang, A., Huang, K. C., Iram, T., Isobe, T., Ives, F., Jones, R. C., Kao, K. S., Karnam, G., Kershner, A. M., Khoury, N., Kim, S. K., Kiss, B. M., Kong, W., Krasnow, M. A., Kumar, M. E., Kuo, C. S., Lam, J., Lee, D. P., Lee, S. E., Lehallier, B., Leventhal, O., Li, G., Li, Q., Liu, L., Lo, A., Lu, W., Lugo-Fagundo, M. F., Manjunath, A., May, A. P., Maynard, A., McKay, M., McNerney, M. W., Merrill, B., Metzger, R. J., Mignardi, M., Min, D., Nabhan, A. N., Ng, K. M., Nguyen, P. K., Noh, J., Nusse, R., Patkar, R., Peng, W. C., Penland, L., Pollard, K., Puccinelli, R., Qi, Z., Rando, T. A., Rulifson, E. J., Segal, J. M., Sikandar, S. S., Sinha, R., Sit, R. V., Sonnenburg, J., Staehli, D., Szade, K., Tan, M., Tato, C., Tellez, K., Torrez Dulgeroff, L. B., Travaglini, K. J., Tropini, C., Tsui, M., Waldburger, L., Wang, B. M., van Weele, L. J., Weinberg, K., Weissman, I. L., Wosczyna, M. N., Wu, S. M., Xiang, J., Xue, S., Yamauchi, K. A., Yang, A. C., Yerra, L. P., Youngyunpipatkul, J., Yu, B., Zanini, F., Zardeneta, M. E., Zee, A., Zhao, C., Zhang, F., Zhang, H., Zhang, M. J., Zhou, L., Zou, J. 2022

    Abstract

    The ability to slow or reverse biological ageing would have major implications for mitigating disease risk and maintaining vitality1. Although an increasing number of interventions show promise for rejuvenation2, their effectiveness on disparate cell types across the body and the molecular pathways susceptible to rejuvenation remain largely unexplored. Here we performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 20 organs to reveal cell-type-specific responses to young and aged blood in heterochronic parabiosis. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells, haematopoietic stem cells and hepatocytes are among those cell types that are especially responsive. On the pathway level, young blood invokes new gene sets in addition to reversing established ageing patterns, with the global rescue of genes encoding electron transport chain subunits pinpointing a prominent role of mitochondrial function in parabiosis-mediated rejuvenation. We observed an almost universal loss of gene expression with age that is largely mimicked by parabiosis: aged blood reduces global gene expression, and young blood restores it in select cell types. Together, these data lay the groundwork for a systemic understanding of the interplay between blood-borne factors and cellular integrity.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-022-04461-2

    View details for PubMedID 35236985

  • A human brain vascular atlas reveals diverse mediators of Alzheimer's risk. Nature Yang, A. C., Vest, R. T., Kern, F., Lee, D. P., Agam, M., Maat, C. A., Losada, P. M., Chen, M. B., Schaum, N., Khoury, N., Toland, A., Calcuttawala, K., Shin, H., Palovics, R., Shin, A., Wang, E. Y., Luo, J., Gate, D., Schulz-Schaeffer, W. J., Chu, P., Siegenthaler, J. A., McNerney, M. W., Keller, A., Wyss-Coray, T. 2022

    Abstract

    The human brain vasculature is of great medical importance: its dysfunction causes disability and death1, and the specialized structure it forms-the blood-brain barrier-impedes the treatment of nearly all brain disorders2,3. Yet so far, we have no molecular map of the human brain vasculature. Here we develop vessel isolation and nuclei extraction for sequencing (VINE-seq) to profile the major vascular and perivascular cell types of the human brain through 143,793 single-nucleus transcriptomes from 25 hippocampus and cortex samples of 9 individuals with Alzheimer's disease and 8 individuals with no cognitive impairment. We identify brain-region- and species-enriched genes and pathways. We reveal molecular principles of human arteriovenous organization, recapitulating a gradual endothelial and punctuated mural cell continuum. We discover two subtypes of human pericytes, marked by solute transport and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization; and define perivascular versus meningeal fibroblast specialization. In Alzheimer's disease, we observe selective vulnerability of ECM-maintaining pericytes and gene expression patterns that implicate dysregulated blood flow. With an expanded survey of brain cell types, we find that 30 of the top 45 genes that have been linked to Alzheimer's diseaserisk by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) are expressed in the human brain vasculature, and we confirm this by immunostaining. Vascular GWAS genes map to endothelial protein transport, adaptive immune and ECM pathways. Many are microglia-specific in mice, suggesting a partial evolutionary transfer of Alzheimer's disease risk. Our work uncovers the molecular basis of the human brain vasculature, which will inform our understanding of overall brain health, disease and therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-021-04369-3

    View details for PubMedID 35165441

  • Companies under stress: the impact of shocks on the production network EPJ DATA SCIENCE Palovics, R., Dolenc, P., Leskovec, J. 2021; 10 (1)
  • Single Cell ADNP Predictive of Human Muscle Disorders: Mouse Knockdown Results in Muscle Wasting. Cells Kapitansky, O., Karmon, G., Sragovich, S., Hadar, A., Shahoha, M., Jaljuli, I., Bikovski, L., Giladi, E., Palovics, R., Iram, T., Gozes, I. 2020; 9 (10)

    Abstract

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) mutations are linked with cognitive dysfunctions characterizing the autistic-like ADNP syndrome patients, who also suffer from delayed motor maturation. We thus hypothesized that ADNP is deregulated in versatile myopathies and that local ADNP muscle deficiency results in myopathy, treatable by the ADNP fragment NAP. Here, single-cell transcriptomics identified ADNP as a major constituent of the developing human muscle. ADNP transcript concentrations further predicted multiple human muscle diseases, with concentrations negatively correlated with the ADNP target interacting protein, microtubule end protein 1 (EB1). Reverting back to modeling at the single-cell level of the male mouse transcriptome, Adnp mRNA concentrations age-dependently correlated with motor disease as well as with sexual maturation gene transcripts, while Adnp expressing limb muscle cells significantly decreased with aging. Mouse Adnp heterozygous deficiency exhibited muscle microtubule reduction and myosin light chain (Myl2) deregulation coupled with motor dysfunction. CRISPR knockdown of adult gastrocnemius muscle Adnp in a Cas9 mouse resulted in treadmill (male) and gait (female) dysfunctions that were specifically ameliorated by treatment with the ADNP snippet, microtubule interacting, Myl2-regulating, NAP (CP201). Taken together, our studies provide new hope for personalized diagnosis/therapeutics in versatile myopathies.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/cells9102320

    View details for PubMedID 33086621

  • Ageing hallmarks exhibit organ-specific temporal signatures. Nature Schaum, N. n., Lehallier, B. n., Hahn, O. n., Pálovics, R. n., Hosseinzadeh, S. n., Lee, S. E., Sit, R. n., Lee, D. P., Losada, P. M., Zardeneta, M. E., Fehlmann, T. n., Webber, J. T., McGeever, A. n., Calcuttawala, K. n., Zhang, H. n., Berdnik, D. n., Mathur, V. n., Tan, W. n., Zee, A. n., Tan, M. n., Pisco, A. O., Karkanias, J. n., Neff, N. F., Keller, A. n., Darmanis, S. n., Quake, S. R., Wyss-Coray, T. n. 2020

    Abstract

    Ageing is the single greatest cause of disease and death worldwide, and understanding the associated processes could vastly improve quality of life. Although major categories of ageing damage have been identified-such as altered intercellular communication, loss of proteostasis and eroded mitochondrial function1-these deleterious processes interact with extraordinary complexity within and between organs, and a comprehensive, whole-organism analysis of ageing dynamics has been lacking. Here we performed bulk RNA sequencing of 17 organs and plasma proteomics at 10 ages across the lifespan of Mus musculus, and integrated these findings with data from the accompanying Tabula Muris Senis2-or 'Mouse Ageing Cell Atlas'-which follows on from the original Tabula Muris3. We reveal linear and nonlinear shifts in gene expression during ageing, with the associated genes clustered in consistent trajectory groups with coherent biological functions-including extracellular matrix regulation, unfolded protein binding, mitochondrial function, and inflammatory and immune response. Notably, these gene sets show similar expression across tissues, differing only in the amplitude and the age of onset of expression. Widespread activation of immune cells is especially pronounced, and is first detectable in white adipose depots during middle age. Single-cell RNA sequencing confirms the accumulation of T cells and B cells in adipose tissue-including plasma cells that express immunoglobulin J-which also accrue concurrently across diverse organs. Finally, we show how gene expression shifts in distinct tissues are highly correlated with corresponding protein levels in plasma, thus potentially contributing to the ageing of the systemic circulation. Together, these data demonstrate a similar yet asynchronous inter- and intra-organ progression of ageing, providing a foundation from which to track systemic sources of declining health at old age.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-020-2499-y

    View details for PubMedID 32669715

  • A single-cell transcriptomic atlas characterizes ageing tissues in the mouse. Nature 2020

    Abstract

    Ageing is characterized by a progressive loss of physiological integrity, leading to impaired function and increased vulnerability to death1. Despite rapid advances over recent years, many of the molecular and cellular processes that underlie the progressive loss of healthy physiology are poorly understood2. To gain a better insight into these processes, here we generate a single-cell transcriptomic atlas across the lifespan of Mus musculus that includes data from 23 tissues and organs. We found cell-specific changes occurring across multiple cell types and organs, as well as age-related changes in the cellular composition of different organs. Using single-cell transcriptomic data, we assessed cell-type-specific manifestations of different hallmarks of ageing-such as senescence3, genomic instability4 and changes in the immune system2. This transcriptomic atlas-which we denote Tabula Muris Senis, or 'Mouse Ageing Cell Atlas'-provides molecular information about how the most important hallmarks of ageing are reflected in a broad range of tissues and cell types.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-020-2496-1

    View details for PubMedID 32669714

  • Temporal walk based centrality metric for graph streams. Applied network science Beres, F., Palovics, R., Olah, A., Benczur, A. A. 2018; 3 (1): 32

    Abstract

    A plethora of centrality measures or rankings have been proposed to account for the importance of the nodes of a network. In the seminal study of Boldi and Vigna (2014), the comparative evaluation of centrality measures was termed a difficult, arduous task. In networks with fast dynamics, such as the Twitter mention or retweet graphs, predicting emerging centrality is even more challenging. Our main result is a new, temporal walk based dynamic centrality measure that models temporal information propagation by considering the order of edge creation. Dynamic centrality measures have already started to emerge in publications; however, their empirical evaluation is limited. One of our main contributions is creating a quantitative experiment to assess temporal centrality metrics. In this experiment, our new measure outperforms graph snapshot based static and other recently proposed dynamic centrality measures in assigning the highest time-aware centrality to the actually relevant nodes of the network. Additional experiments over different data sets show that our method perform well for detecting concept drift in the process that generates the graphs.

    View details for PubMedID 30839791