Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Co-Medical Director, Infection Prevention and Control at LPCH (2021 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Infectious Diseases Society of America (2008 - Present)
  • Member, Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (2012 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Stanford University Pediatric Infectious Disease Fellowship (2011) CA
  • Residency: University of Illinois at Chicago Pediatric Residency (2008) IL
  • Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Diseases (2011)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatrics (2008)
  • Medical Education: Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College (2003) India

All Publications


  • Development and Implementation of a Real-time Bundle-adherence Dashboard for Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infections. Pediatric quality & safety Chemparathy, A., Seneviratne, M. G., Ward, A., Mirchandani, S., Li, R., Mathew, R., Wood, M., Shin, A. Y., Donnelly, L. F., Scheinker, D., Lee, G. M. 2021; 6 (4): e431

    Abstract

    Introduction: Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infection in pediatric patients. High adherence to the CLABSI bundle mitigates CLABSIs. At our institution, there did not exist a hospital-wide system to measure bundle-adherence. We developed an electronic dashboard to monitor CLABSI bundle-adherence across the hospital and in real time.Methods: Institutional stakeholders and areas of opportunity were identified through interviews and data analyses. We created a data pipeline to pull adherence data from twice-daily bundle checks and populate a dashboard in the electronic health record. The dashboard was developed to allow visualization of overall and individual element bundle-adherence across units. Monthly dashboard accesses and element-level bundle-adherence were recorded, and the nursing staff's feedback about the dashboard was obtained.Results: Following deployment in September 2018, the dashboard was primarily accessed by quality improvement, clinical effectiveness and analytics, and infection prevention and control. Quality improvement and infection prevention and control specialists presented dashboard data at improvement meetings to inform unit-level accountability initiatives. All-element adherence across the hospital increased from 25% in September 2018 to 44% in December 2019, and average adherence to each bundle element increased between 2018 and 2019.Conclusions: CLABSI bundle-adherence, overall and by element, increased across the hospital following the deployment of a real-time electronic data dashboard. The dashboard enabled population-level surveillance of CLABSI bundle-adherence that informed bundle accountability initiatives. Data transparency enabled by electronic dashboards promises to be a useful tool for infectious disease control.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000431

    View details for PubMedID 34235355

  • Post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infections and incidence of presumptive B.1.427/B.1.429 variant among healthcare personnel at a northern California academic medical center. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America Jacobson, K. B., Pinsky, B. A., Montez Rath, M. E., Wang, H., Miller, J. A., Skhiri, M., Shepard, J., Mathew, R., Lee, G., Bohman, B., Parsonnet, J., Holubar, M. 2021

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Although mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccines report ≥90% efficacy, breakthrough infections occur. Little is known about the effectiveness of these vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 variants, including the highly-prevalent B.1.427/B.1.429 variant in California..METHODS: In this quality improvement project, we collected demographic and clinical information from post-vaccine SARS-CoV-2 cases (PVSCs), defined as health care personnel (HCP) with positive SARS-CoV-2 NAAT after receiving ≥1 vaccine dose. Available specimens were tested for L452R, N501Y and E484K mutations by RT-PCR. Mutation prevalence was compared among unvaccinated, early post-vaccinated (<=14 days after dose 1), partially vaccinated (positive test >14 days after dose 1 and ≤14 days after dose 2) and fully vaccinated (>14 days after dose 2) PVSCs.RESULTS: From December 2020-April 2021, >=23,090 HCPS received at least1 dose of an mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, and 660 HCP cases of SARS-CoV-2 occurred of which 189 were PVSCs. Among the PVSCs, 114 (60.3%), 49 (25.9%) and 26 (13.8%) were early post-vaccination, partially vaccinated, and fully vaccinated, respectively. Of 261 available samples from vaccinated and unvaccinated HCP, 103 (39.5%), including 42 PVSCs (36.5%), had L452R mutation presumed to be B.1.427/B.1.429,. When adjusted for community prevalence of B.1.427/B.1.429, PVSCs did not have significantly elevated risk for infection with B.1.427/B.1.429 compared with unvaccinated HCP.CONCLUSIONS: Most PVSCs occurred prior to expected onset of full, vaccine-derived immunity. Presumptive B.1.427/B.1.429 was not more prevalent in post-vaccine cases than in unvaccinated SARS-CoV-2 HCP. Continued infection control measures, particularly ≤14 days post-vaccination, and continued variant surveillance in PVSCs is imperative to control future SARS-CoV-2 surges.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/cid/ciab554

    View details for PubMedID 34137815

  • "For COVID" or "With COVID": Classification of SARS-CoV-2 Hospitalizations in Children. Hospital pediatrics Kushner, L. E., Schroeder, A. R., Kim, J., Mathew, R. 2021

    View details for DOI 10.1542/hpeds.2021-006001

    View details for PubMedID 34011566

  • Strand Specific Reverse Transcription PCR for Detection of Replicating SARS-CoV-2 EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES Hogan, C. A., Huang, C., Sahoo, M. K., Wang, H., Jiang, B., Sibai, M., Holubar, M., Mathew, R., Zehnder, J., Pinsky, B. A. 2021; 27 (2): 632–35

    Abstract

    We developed an assay that detects minus-strand RNA as a surrogate for actively replicating severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. We detected minus-strand RNA in 41 persons with coronavirus disease up to 30 days after symptom onset. This assay might inform clinical decision-making about patient infectiousness.

    View details for DOI 10.3201/eid2702.204168

    View details for Web of Science ID 000631538500043

    View details for PubMedID 33496233

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7853532

  • Post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infections and incidence of the B.1.427/B.1.429 variant among healthcare personnel at a northern California academic medical center. medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences Jacobson, K. B., Pinsky, B. A., Rath, M. E., Wang, H., Miller, J. A., Skhiri, M., Shepard, J., Mathew, R., Lee, G., Bohman, B., Parsonnet, J., Holubar, M. 2021

    Abstract

    Distribution of mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccines to healthcare personnel (HCP) in the United States began in December 2020, with efficacy > 90%. However, breakthrough infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been reported. Meanwhile, multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern have emerged worldwide, including the B.1.427/B.1.429 variant first described in California. Little is known about the real-world effectiveness of the mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccines against novel variants including B.1.427/B.1.429.In this quality improvement project, post-vaccine SARS-CoV-2 cases (PVSCs) were defined as individuals with positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) after receiving at least one dose of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Chart extraction of demographic and clinical information was performed, and available specimens meeting cycle threshold value criteria were tested for L452R, N501Y and E484K mutations by RT-PCR.From December 2020 to March 2021, 189 PVSCs were identified out of 22,729 healthcare personnel who received at least one dose of an mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Of these, 114 (60.3%) occurred within 14 days of first vaccine dose (early post-vaccination), 49 (25.9%) within 14 days of the second vaccine dose (partially vaccinated), and 26 (13.8%) > 14 days after the second dose (fully vaccinated). Of 115 samples available for mutation testing, 42 were positive for L452R alone, presumptive of B.1.427/B.1.429; three had N501Y mutation alone and none were found with E484K mutation. Though on univariate analysis partially- and fully-vaccinated PVSCs were more likely than early post-vaccination PVSCs to be infected with presumptive B.1.427/B.1.429, when adjusted for community prevalence of B.1.427/B.1.429 at the time of infection, partially- and fully-vaccinated PVSC did not have statistically significantly elevated risk ratios for infection with this variant (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.81-2.43 and RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.59-2.16, respectively).The great majority of PVSCs occurred prior to the expected onset of full, vaccine-derived immunity. Although the B.1.427/B.1.429 variant did not represent a significantly higher proportion of PVSCs than expected, numbers were small and there was a trend towards higher representation in the partially- and fully-vaccinated subset. Continued infection control measures in the workplace and in the community including social distancing and masking, particularly in the early days post-vaccination, as well as continued variant surveillance in PVSCs, is imperative in order to anticipate and control future surges of infection.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/2021.04.14.21255431

    View details for PubMedID 33907767

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8077590

  • SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in Healthcare Personnel in Northern California Early in the COVID-19 Pandemic. Infection control and hospital epidemiology Rosser, J. I., Roltgen, K., Dymock, M., Shepard, J., Martin, A., Hogan, C. A., Blomkalns, A., Mathew, R., Parsonnet, J., Pinsky, B. A., Maldonado, Y. A., Boyd, S. D., Chang, S., Holubar, M., Stanford Healthcare COVID-19 Workforce Response Group 2020: 1–27

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the magnitude of unidentified SARS-CoV-2 infections in our healthcare personnel (HCP) early in the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluate risk factors for infection in order to identify areas for infection control practice improvement in a northern California academic medical center.METHODS: We reviewed the anti-SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) IgG serologic test results and self-reported risk factors for seropositivity among 10,449 asymptomatic HCP who underwent voluntary serology testing between April 20 and May 20, 2020.RESULTS: In total, 136 employees (1.3%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 IgG. This included 41 (30.1%) individuals who had previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by nasopharyngeal reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) between March 13 and April 16, 2020. In multivariable analysis, employees of Hispanic ethnicity (OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.22-3.46) and those working in environmental services/food services/patient transport (OR = 4.81; 95% CI = 2.08-10.30) were at increased risk for seropositivity compared to other groups. Employees reporting a household contact with COVID-19 were also at higher risk for seropositivity (OR = 3.25; 95% CI = 1.47-6.44), but those with a work exposure were not (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 0.58-2.47). Importantly, one-third of seropositive individuals reported no prior symptoms, no suspected exposures, and no prior positive RT-PCR test.CONCLUSION: In this study, SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among HCP early in the northern California epidemic appeared to be quite low and was more likely attributable to community rather than occupational exposure.

    View details for DOI 10.1017/ice.2020.1358

    View details for PubMedID 33292895

  • Reduction of Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Through Focus on the Mesosystem: Standardization, Data, and Accountability. Pediatric quality & safety Mathew, R., Simms, A., Wood, M., Taylor, K., Ferrari, S., Rhein, M., Margallo, D., Bain, L. C., Valencia, A. K., Bargmann-Losche, J., Donnelly, L. F., Lee, G. M. 2020; 5 (2): e272

    Abstract

    Introduction: Efforts to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates require strong microsystems for success. However, variation in practices across units leads to challenges in ensuring accountability. We redesigned the organization's mesosystem to provide oversight and alignment of microsystem efforts and ensure accountability in the context of the macrosystem. We implemented an A3 framework to achieve reductions in CLABSI through adherence to known evidence-based bundles.Methods: We conducted this CLABSI reduction improvement initiative at a 395-bed freestanding, academic, university-affiliated children's hospital. A mesosystem-focused A3 emphasized bundle adherence through 3 key drivers (1) practice standardization, (2) data transparency, and (3) accountability. We evaluated the impact of this intervention on CLABSI rates during the pre-intervention (01/15-09/17) and post-intervention (07/18-06/19) periods using a Poisson model controlling for baseline trends.Results: Our quarterly CLABSI rates during the pre-intervention period ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line-days. With the mesosystem in place, CLABSI rates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 per 1,000 central line days during the post-intervention period. Adjusting for secular trends, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the post versus pre-intervention CLABSI rate of 71%.Conclusion: Our hospital-wide CLABSI rate declined for the first time in many years after the redesign of the mesosystem and a focus on practice standardization, data transparency, and accountability. Our approach highlights the importance of alignment across unit-level microsystems to ensure high-fidelity implementation of practice standards throughout the healthcare-delivery system.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/pq9.0000000000000272

    View details for PubMedID 32426638

  • Differences in Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates Based on the Criteria Used to Count Central Line Days. JAMA Scheinker, D., Ward, A., Shin, A. Y., Lee, G. M., Mathew, R., Donnelly, L. F. 2020; 323 (2): 183–85

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jama.2019.18616

    View details for PubMedID 31935018

  • COVID-19 and Kawasaki Disease: Novel Virus and Novel Case. Hospital pediatrics Jones, V. G., Mills, M. n., Suarez, D. n., Hogan, C. A., Yeh, D. n., Bradley Segal, J. n., Nguyen, E. L., Barsh, G. R., Maskatia, S. n., Mathew, R. n. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1542/hpeds.2020-0123

    View details for PubMedID 32265235

  • Health Care-Associated Infections Among Critically Ill Children in the US, 2013-2018. JAMA pediatrics Hsu, H. E., Mathew, R. n., Wang, R. n., Broadwell, C. n., Horan, K. n., Jin, R. n., Rhee, C. n., Lee, G. M. 2020

    Abstract

    Central catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) increase morbidity, mortality, and health care costs in pediatric patients.To examine changes over time in CLABSI and CAUTI rates between 2013 and 2018 in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) using prospective surveillance data from community hospitals, children's hospitals, and pediatric units within general hospitals.This time series study included 176 US hospitals reporting pediatric health care-associated infection surveillance data to the National Healthcare Safety Network from January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2018. Patients aged 18 years or younger admitted to PICUs or level III NICUs were included in the analysis.The primary outcomes were device-associated rates of CLABSI in NICUs and PICUs and CAUTI in PICUs (infections per 1000 device-days). Secondary outcomes included population-based rates (infections per 10 000 patient-days) and device utilization (device-days per patient-days). Regression models were fit using generalized estimating equations to assess yearly changes in CLABSI and CAUTI rates, adjusted for birth weight (≤1500 vs >1500 g) in neonatal models.Of the 176 hospitals, 132 hospitals with NICUs and 114 hospitals with PICUs contributed data. Of these, NICUs reported 6 064 172 patient-days and 1 363 700 central line-days and PICUs reported 1 999 979 patient-days, 925 956 central catheter-days, and 327 599 indwelling urinary catheter-days. In NICUs, there were no significant changes in yearly trends in device-associated (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per year, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.95-1.03) and population-based (IRR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.92-1.00) CLABSI rates or central catheter utilization (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-1.00). Results were similar in PICUs, with device-associated (IRR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.99-1.07) and population-based (IRR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.99-1.07) CLABSI rates and central catheter utilization (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01) remaining stable. While device-associated CAUTI rates in PICUs also remained unchanged over time (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), population-based CAUTI rates significantly decreased by 8% per year (IRR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.98) and indwelling urinary catheter utilization significantly decreased by 6% per year (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96).Recent trends in CLABSI rates noted in this study among critically ill neonates and children in a large cohort of US hospitals indicate that past gains have held, without evidence of further improvements, suggesting novel approaches for CLABSI prevention are needed. Modest improvements in population-based CAUTI rates likely reflect more judicious use of urinary catheters.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.3223

    View details for PubMedID 33017011

  • Mucormycosis diagnosed during induction chemotherapy in five pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Pediatric blood & cancer Aftandilian, C., Eguiguren, L., Mathew, R., Messner, A. 2019: e27834

    Abstract

    Mucormycosis in pediatric oncology patients is a rare invasive fungal infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe five patients diagnosed with mucormycosis during induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia at our institution. All of the patients in our series survived, some in spite of having disseminated disease. Most of the patients' chemotherapy was modified with the aim of controlling their leukemia while minimizing immunosuppression until their fungal infection was under control. Although mucormycosis is frequently fatal, rapid diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach can lead to excellent outcomes, even in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/pbc.27834

    View details for PubMedID 31131954

  • Foregone Inclusion: Neonatal CMV Hepatitis and Cholestasis. Digestive diseases and sciences Martin, M. n., Holmes, S. n., Sim, J. n., Hassan, M. n., Mathew, R. n., Bensen, R. n., Barakat, M. n. 2019

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-019-05691-7

    View details for PubMedID 31187327

  • Complicated pneumonia: current concepts and state of the art. Current opinion in pediatrics Tracy, M. C., Mathew, R. n. 2018

    Abstract

    This review aims to provide clinicians engaged in the care of infants and children an update on the current understanding of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnostic evaluation, and clinical management of complicated pneumonia. The review provides timely information surrounding areas of consensus and ongoing research.The epidemiology and etiologies of complicated pneumonia continue to evolve over the past several decades in context of the introduction of new vaccines. We review uncommon and emerging pathogens. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk for complications. The 2011 clinical practice guidelines for pediatric community-acquired pneumonia from The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America and the British Thoracic Society are changing approaches to evaluation and management. The efficacy of new diagnostic laboratory studies, and imaging techniques, continues to be studied. Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment, with several new options to consider. Techniques for the drainage of parapneumonic effusions continue to optimize.Although much is known about complicated pneumonia, it remains a significant burden. New diagnostic and therapeutic interventions hold much promise. This review seeks to provide clinicians with evidence that motivates a reasoned approach to the evaluation and management of complicated pneumonia.

    View details for PubMedID 29528891

  • Pleural Effusion and Fever in an Immunocompromised Patient. Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Kay, A. W., Itoh, M., Valdez, J., Chen, S. F., Mathew, R., Gans, H. A. 2015; 4 (1): e6-9

    View details for DOI 10.1093/jpids/piu018

    View details for PubMedID 26407371