Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Assistant Medical Director, Stanford Emergency Department (2019 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Chair, Board of Directors, SimX Inc (2017 - Present)
  • Board of Trustees, American Medical Assocation (2017 - 2019)
  • Board of Directors, CALPAC (2012 - 2015)
  • Board of Trustees, California Medical Association (2010 - 2011)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, Administration (2019)
  • Residency: Stanford University Emergency Medicine Residency (2017) CA
  • MPH, Harvard University, Healthcare Policy and Management (2014)
  • Medical Education: University of California Davis School of Medicine (2014) CA
  • BS, Brigham Young University, Double Major, Business Management & Nutrition (2008)

All Publications


  • Emergency Department Access During COVID-19: Disparities in Utilization by Race/Ethnicity, Insurance, and Income Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Lowe, J., Brown, I., Duriseti, R., et al 2021: 552-560

    Abstract

    In March 2020, shelter-in-place orders were enacted to attenuate the spread of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Emergency departments (EDs) experienced unexpected and dramatic decreases in patient volume, raising concerns about exacerbating health disparities.We queried our electronic health record to describe the overall change in visits to a two-ED healthcare system in Northern California from March-June 2020 compared to 2019. We compared weekly absolute numbers and proportional change in visits focusing on race/ethnicity, insurance, household income, and acuity. We calculated the z-score to identify whether there was a statistically significant difference in proportions between 2020 and 2019.Overall ED volume declined 28% during the study period. The nadir of volume was 52% of 2019 levels and occurred five weeks after a shelter-in-place order was enacted. Patient demographics also shifted. By week 4 (April 5), the proportion of Hispanic patients decreased by 3.3 percentage points (pp) (P = 0.0053) compared to a 6.2 pp increase in White patients (P = 0.000005). The proportion of patients with commercial insurance increased by 11.6 pp, while Medicaid visits decreased by 9.5 pp (P < 0.00001) at the initiation of shelter-in-place orders. For patients from neighborhoods <300% federal poverty levels (FPL), visits were -3.8 pp (P = 0.000046) of baseline compared to +2.9 pp (P = 0.0044) for patients from ZIP codes at >400% FPL the week of the shelter-in-place order. Overall, 2020 evidenced a consistently elevated proportion of high-acuity Emergency Severity Index (ESI) level 1 patients compared to 2019. Increased acuity was also demonstrated by an increase in the admission rate, with a 10.8 pp increase from 2019. Although there was an increased proportion of high-acuity patients, the overall census was decreased.Our results demonstrate changing ED utilization patterns circa the shelter-in-place orders. Those from historically vulnerable populations such as Hispanics, those from lower socioeconomic areas, and Medicaid users presented at disproportionately lower rates and numbers than other groups. As the pandemic continues, hospitals should use operations data to monitor utilization patterns by demographic, in addition to clinical indicators. Messaging about availability of emergency care and other services should include vulnerable populations to avoid exacerbating healthcare disparities.

    View details for DOI 10.5811/westjem.2021.1.49279

  • Telemedicine to Decrease Personal Protective Equipment Use and Protect Healthcare Workers. The western journal of emergency medicine Ribeira, R., Shen, S., Callagy, P., Newberry, J., Strehlow, M., Quinn, J. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.5811/westjem.2020.8.47802

    View details for PubMedID 33052823

  • A Custom-Developed Emergency Department Provider Electronic Documentation System Reduces Operational Efficiency. Annals of emergency medicine Feblowitz, J. n., Takhar, S. S., Ward, M. J., Ribeira, R. n., Landman, A. B. 2017; 70 (5): 674–82.e1

    Abstract

    Electronic health record implementation can improve care, but may also adversely affect emergency department (ED) efficiency. We examine how a custom, ED provider, electronic documentation system (eDoc), which replaced paper documentation, affects operational performance.We analyzed retrospective operational data for 1-year periods before and after eDoc implementation in a single ED. We computed daily operational statistics, reflecting 60,870 pre- and 59,337 postimplementation patient encounters. The prespecified primary outcome was daily mean length of stay; secondary outcomes were daily mean length of stay for admitted and discharged patients and daily mean arrival time to disposition for admitted patients. We used a prespecified multiple regression model to identify differences in outcomes while controlling for prespecified confounding variables.The unadjusted change in length of stay was 8.4 minutes; unadjusted changes in secondary outcomes were length of stay for admitted patients 11.4 minutes, length of stay for discharged patients 1.8 minutes, and time to disposition 1.8 minutes. With a prespecified regression analysis to control for variations in operational characteristics, there were significant increases in length of stay (6.3 minutes [95% confidence interval 3.5 to 9.1 minutes]) and length of stay for discharged patients (5.1 minutes [95% confidence interval 1.9 to 8.3 minutes]). There was no statistically significant change in length of stay for admitted patients or time to disposition.In our single-center study, the isolated implementation of eDoc was associated with increases in overall and discharge length of stay. Our findings suggest that a custom-designed electronic provider documentation may negatively affect ED throughput. Strategies to mitigate these effects, such as reducing documentation requirements or adding clinical staff, scribes, or voice recognition, would be a valuable area of future research.

    View details for PubMedID 28712608

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5653416