Honors & Awards


  • Healthcare 30 Under 30, Forbes (2021)
  • National Eye Institute T32 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University (2021)
  • STAT Wunderkind, STAT News (2020)
  • Magna Cum Laude, Harvard Medical School (2020)
  • Research Award, VitreoRetinal Surgery Foundation (2020)
  • Elizabeth D. Hay Prize for Basic Science Research, Harvard Medical School (2019)
  • Travel Grant Award, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (2019)
  • HHMI Medical Research Fellowship, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2018)
  • J.E. Wallace Sterling Award for Scholastic Achievement, Stanford University (2014)

Professional Education


  • Residency, Stanford Ophthalmology Advanced Research Residency (2021-2025)
  • Internship, Cambridge Health Alliance (2020-2021)
  • M.D., Harvard Medical School (2015-2020)
  • B.S., Stanford University (2011-2014)

Stanford Advisors


Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • Augmentation of CD47-SIRPalpha signaling protects cones in genetic models of retinal degeneration. JCI insight Wang, S. K., Xue, Y., Cepko, C. L. 2021

    Abstract

    Inherited retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by thousands of different mutations, a small number of which have been successfully treated with gene replacement. However, this approach has yet to scale and may not be feasible in many cases, highlighting the need for interventions that could benefit more patients. Here, we found that microglial phagocytosis is upregulated during cone degeneration in RP, suggesting that expression of "don't eat me" signals such as CD47 might confer protection to cones. To test this, we delivered an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing CD47 on cones, which promoted cone survival in three mouse models of RP and preserved visual function. Cone rescue with CD47 required a known interacting protein, signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha), but not an alternative interacting protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP1). Despite the correlation between increased microglial phagocytosis and cone death, microglia were dispensable for the pro-survival activity of CD47, suggesting that CD47 interacts with SIRPalpha on non-microglial cells to alleviate degeneration. These findings establish augmentation of CD47-SIRPalpha signaling as a potential treatment strategy for RP and possibly other forms of neurodegeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.1172/jci.insight.150796

    View details for PubMedID 34197341

  • AAV-Txnip prolongs cone survival and vision in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa Xue, Y., Wang, S., Rana, P., West, E., Hong, C., Feng, H., Wu, D. M., Cepko, C. L. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2021
  • AAV-Txnip prolongs cone survival and vision in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa ELIFE Xue, Y., Wang, S. K., Rana, P., West, E. R., Hong, C. M., Feng, H., Wu, D. M., Cepko, C. L. 2021; 10

    Abstract

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal disease affecting >20 million people worldwide. Loss of daylight vision typically occurs due to the dysfunction/loss of cone photoreceptors, the cell type that initiates our color and high-acuity vision. Currently, there is no effective treatment for RP, other than gene therapy for a limited number of specific disease genes. To develop a disease gene-agnostic therapy, we screened 20 genes for their ability to prolong cone photoreceptor survival in vivo. Here, we report an adeno-associated virus vector expressing Txnip, which prolongs the survival of cone photoreceptors and improves visual acuity in RP mouse models. A Txnip allele, C247S, which blocks the association of Txnip with thioredoxin, provides an even greater benefit. Additionally, the rescue effect of Txnip depends on lactate dehydrogenase b (Ldhb) and correlates with the presence of healthier mitochondria, suggesting that Txnip saves RP cones by enhancing their lactate catabolism.

    View details for DOI 10.7554/eLife.66240

    View details for Web of Science ID 000645438300001

    View details for PubMedID 33847261

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8081528

  • Engineering adeno-associated viral vectors to evade innate immune and inflammatory responses SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE Chan, Y., Wang, S. K., Chu, C. J., Copland, D. A., Letizia, A. J., Verdera, H., Chiang, J. J., Sethi, M., Wang, M. K., Neidermyer, W. J., Chan, Y., Lim, E. T., Graveline, A. R., Sanchez, M., Boyd, R. F., Vihtelic, T. S., Inciong, R. O., Slain, J. M., Alphonse, P. J., Xue, Y., Robinson-McCarthy, L. R., Tam, J. M., Jabbar, M. H., Sahu, B., Adeniran, J. F., Muhuri, M., Tai, P. L., Xie, J., Krause, T. B., Vernet, A., Pezone, M., Xiao, R., Liu, T., Wang, W., Kaplan, H. J., Gao, G., Dick, A. D., Mingozzi, F., McCall, M. A., Cepko, C. L., Church, G. M. 2021; 13 (580)

    Abstract

    Nucleic acids are used in many therapeutic modalities, including gene therapy, but their ability to trigger host immune responses in vivo can lead to decreased safety and efficacy. In the case of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, studies have shown that the genome of the vector activates Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), a pattern recognition receptor that senses foreign DNA. Here, we engineered AAV vectors to be intrinsically less immunogenic by incorporating short DNA oligonucleotides that antagonize TLR9 activation directly into the vector genome. The engineered vectors elicited markedly reduced innate immune and T cell responses and enhanced gene expression in clinically relevant mouse and pig models across different tissues, including liver, muscle, and retina. Subretinal administration of higher-dose AAV in pigs resulted in photoreceptor pathology with microglia and T cell infiltration. These adverse findings were avoided in the contralateral eyes of the same animals that were injected with the engineered vectors. However, intravitreal injection of higher-dose AAV in macaques, a more immunogenic route of administration, showed that the engineered vector delayed but did not prevent clinical uveitis, suggesting that other immune factors in addition to TLR9 may contribute to intraocular inflammation in this model. Our results demonstrate that linking specific immunomodulatory noncoding sequences to much longer therapeutic nucleic acids can "cloak" the vector from inducing unwanted immune responses in multiple, but not all, models. This "coupled immunomodulation" strategy may widen the therapeutic window for AAV therapies as well as other DNA-based gene transfer methods.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.abd3438

    View details for Web of Science ID 000617688400006

    View details for PubMedID 33568518

  • Nrf2 overexpression rescues the RPE in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa JCI INSIGHT Wu, D. M., Ji, X., Ivanchenko, M., Chung, M., Piper, M., Rana, P., Wang, S. K., Xue, Y., West, E., Zhao, S. R., Xu, H., Cicconet, M., Xiong, W., Cepko, C. L. 2021; 6 (2)

    Abstract

    Nrf2, a transcription factor that regulates the response to oxidative stress, has been shown to rescue cone photoreceptors and slow vision loss in mouse models of retinal degeneration (rd). The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is damaged in these models, but whether it also could be rescued by Nrf2 has not been previously examined. We used an adeno-associated virus (AAV) with an RPE-specific (Best1) promoter to overexpress Nrf2 in the RPE of rd mice. Control rd mice showed disruption of the regular array of the RPE, as well as loss of RPE cells. Cones were lost in circumscribed regions within the cone photoreceptor layer. Overexpression of Nrf2 specifically in the RPE was sufficient to rescue the RPE, as well as the disruptions in the cone photoreceptor layer. Electron microscopy showed compromised apical microvilli in control rd mice but showed preserved microvilli in Best1-Nrf2-treated mice. The rd mice treated with Best1-Nrf2 had slightly better visual acuity. Transcriptome profiling showed that Nrf2 upregulates multiple oxidative defense pathways, reversing declines seen in the glutathione pathway in control rd mice. In summary, Nrf2 overexpression in the RPE preserves RPE morphology and survival in rd mice, and it is a potential therapeutic for diseases involving RPE degeneration, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    View details for DOI 10.1172/jci.insight.145029

    View details for Web of Science ID 000613769000020

    View details for PubMedID 33491671

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7934854

  • In Situ Detection of Adeno-associated Viral Vector Genomes with SABER-FISH MOLECULAR THERAPY-METHODS & CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT Wang, S. K., Lapan, S. W., Hong, C. M., Krause, T. B., Cepko, C. L. 2020; 19: 376-386

    Abstract

    Gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Nonetheless, there remain significant gaps in our understanding of AAV vector biology, due in part to the lack of robust methods to track AAV capsids and genomes. In this study, we describe a novel application of signal amplification by exchange reaction fluorescence in situ hybridization (SABER-FISH) that enabled the visualization and quantification of individual AAV genomes after vector administration in mice. These genomes could be seen in retinal cells within 3 h of subretinal AAV delivery, were roughly full length, and correlated with vector expression in both photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. SABER-FISH readily detected AAV genomes in the liver and muscle following retro-orbital and intramuscular AAV injections, respectively, demonstrating its utility in different tissues. Using SABER-FISH, we also found that retinal microglia, a cell type deemed refractory to AAV transduction, are in fact efficiently infected by multiple AAV serotypes, but appear to degrade AAV genomes prior to nuclear localization. Our findings show that SABER-FISH can be used to visualize AAV genomes in situ, allowing for studies of AAV vector biology and the tracking of transduced cells following vector administration.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.omtm.2020.10.003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000598181600033

    View details for PubMedID 33209963

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7658570

  • Microglia modulation by TGF-beta 1 protects cones in mouse models of retinal degeneration JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Wang, S. K., Xue, Y., Cepko, C. L. 2020; 130 (8): 4360-4369

    Abstract

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogenous group of eye diseases in which initial degeneration of rods triggers secondary degeneration of cones, leading to significant loss of daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Gene complementation with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is one strategy to treat RP. Its implementation faces substantial challenges, however; for example, the tremendous number of loci with causal mutations. Gene therapy targeting secondary cone degeneration is an alternative approach that could provide a much-needed generic treatment for many patients with RP. Here, we show that microglia are required for the upregulation of potentially neurotoxic inflammatory factors during cone degeneration in RP, creating conditions that might contribute to cone dysfunction and death. To ameliorate the effects of such factors, we used AAV vectors to express isoforms of the antiinflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). AAV-mediated delivery of TGF-β1 rescued degenerating cones in 3 mouse models of RP carrying different pathogenic mutations. Treatment with TGF-β1 protected vision, as measured by 2 behavioral assays, and could be pharmacologically disrupted by either depleting microglia or blocking the TGF-β receptors. Our results suggest that TGF-β1 may be broadly beneficial for patients with cone degeneration, and potentially other forms of neurodegeneration, through a pathway dependent upon microglia.

    View details for DOI 10.1172/JCI136160

    View details for Web of Science ID 000579423900004

    View details for PubMedID 32352930

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7410072

  • Meeting the need for corrective spectacles in visually impaired Chinese school children: the potential of ready-made spectacles BRITISH JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY Zhu, Z., Ellwein, L. B., Wang, S. K., Zhao, J., He, M. 2019; 103 (8): 1106-1111

    Abstract

    To assess the potential of ready-made (spherical) spectacles (RMS) in meeting the need for refractive correction in visually impaired children in China.Eligible children aged 5-17 years were identified from the three study sites in China. Distance visual acuity was measured with a retroilluminated logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution chart with tumbling E optotypes. Cycloplegic autorefraction was performed on all children using a handheld autorefractor. If uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was ≤20/40 in either eye, best corrected visual acuity was measured with subjective refractive error. RESULTS : A total of 13 702 children were enumerated from the three studies, with 12 334 (90.0%) having both reliable visual acuity measurements and successful cycloplegia. Among the 12 334 study children, the prevalence of UCVA ≤20/40 in the better seeing eye was 16.4% (95% CI 15.0% to 17.8%), with 91.1% (1843) of these improving by ≥3 lines of visual acuity with refractive correction. Prevalence was 12.7% (95% CI 11.5% to 13.9%) for UCVA <20/50 with 97.4% (1521) improving by ≥3 lines, and 9.38% (95% CI 8.39% to 19.4%) for UCVA ≤20/63 with 98.4% (1138) improving by ≥3 lines. Depending on the severity of visual impairment, 62.8%-64.0% of children could be accommodated with RMS if not correcting for astigmatism of ≤0.75 dioptres and anisometropia of ≤0.50 spherical equivalent dioptres. Approximately 87% of children could be accommodated with RMS if astigmatism and anisometropia limits were increased to ≤1.25 and ≤1.50 dioptres, respectively.RMS could substantially alleviate visual morbidity in two-thirds or more of visually impaired schoolchildren in China. This cost-effective approach to refractive correction might also be useful in low/middle-income countries with poor access to optometric services.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-312262

    View details for Web of Science ID 000478915300016

    View details for PubMedID 30279277

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6678143

  • Circumventing cellular immunity by miR142-mediated regulation sufficiently supports rAAV-delivered OVA expression without activating humoral immunity JCI INSIGHT Xiao, Y., Muhuri, M., Li, S., Qin, W., Xu, G., Luo, L., Li, J., Letizia, A. J., Wang, S. K., Chan, Y., Wang, C., Fuchs, S. P., Wang, D., Su, Q., Abu Nahid, M., Church, G. M., Farzan, M., Yang, L., Wei, Y., Desrosiers, R. C., Mueller, C., Tai, P. L., Gao, G. 2019; 4 (13)

    Abstract

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery can efficiently target muscle tissues to serve as "biofactories" for secreted proteins in prophylactic and therapeutic scenarios. Nevertheless, efficient rAAV-mediated gene delivery is often limited by host immune responses against the transgene product. The development of strategies to prevent anti-transgene immunity is therefore crucial. The employment of endogenous microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation to detarget transgene expression from antigen presenting cells (APCs) has shown promise for reducing immunogenicity. However, the mechanisms underlying miRNA-mediated modulation of anti-transgene immunity by APC detargeting are not fully understood. Using the highly immunogenic ovalbumin (OVA) protein as a proxy for foreign antigens, we show that rAAV vectors containing miR142 binding sites efficiently repress co-stimulatory signals in dendritic cells, significantly blunt the cytotoxic T cell response, allow for sustained transgene expression in skeletal myoblasts, and attenuate clearance of transduced muscle cells in mice. Furthermore, the blunting of humoral immunity against circulating OVA correlates with detargeting of OVA expression from APCs. This demonstrates that incorporating APC-specific miRNA binding sites into rAAV vectors provides an effective strategy for reducing transgene-specific immune response. This approach holds promise for clinical applications where the safe and efficient delivery of a prophylactic or therapeutic protein is desired.

    View details for DOI 10.1172/jci.insight.99052

    View details for Web of Science ID 000474918000025

    View details for PubMedID 31112525

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6629123

  • Soluble CX3CL1 gene therapy improves cone survival and function in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Wang, S. K., Xue, Y., Rana, P., Hong, C. M., Cepko, C. L. 2019; 116 (20): 10140-10149

    Abstract

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a disease that initially presents as night blindness due to genetic deficits in the rod photoreceptors of the retina. Rods then die, causing dysfunction and death of cone photoreceptors, the cell type that mediates high acuity and color vision, ultimately leading to blindness. We investigated immune responses in mouse models of RP and found evidence of microglia activation throughout the period of cone degeneration. Using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs), delivery of genes encoding microglial regulatory signals led to the identification of AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) soluble CX3CL1 (sCX3CL1) as a promising therapy for degenerating cones. Subretinal injection of AAV8-sCX3CL1 significantly prolonged cone survival in three strains of RP mice. Rescue of cones was accompanied by improvements in visual function. AAV8-sCX3CL1 did not affect rod survival, microglia localization, or inflammatory cytokine levels in the retina. Furthermore, although RNA sequencing of microglia demonstrated marked transcriptional changes with AAV8-sCX3CL1, pharmacological depletion of up to ∼99% of microglia failed to abrogate the effect of AAV8-sCX3CL1 on cone survival. These findings indicate that AAV8-sCX3CL1 can rescue cones in multiple mouse models of RP via a pathway that does not require normal numbers of microglia. Gene therapy with sCX3CL1 is a promising mutation-independent approach to preserve vision in RP and potentially other forms of retinal degeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1901787116

    View details for Web of Science ID 000467804000068

    View details for PubMedID 31036641

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6525490

  • AAV cis-regulatory sequences are correlated with ocular toxicity PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Xiong, W., Wu, D. M., Xue, Y., Wang, S. K., Chung, M. J., Ji, X., Rana, P., Zhao, S. R., Mai, S., Cepko, C. L. 2019; 116 (12): 5785-5794

    Abstract

    Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAVs) have become popular for gene therapy, given their many advantages, including their reduced inflammatory profile compared with that of other viruses. However, even in areas of immune privilege such as the eye, AAV vectors are capable of eliciting host-cell responses. To investigate the effects of such responses on several ocular cell types, we tested multiple AAV genome structures and capsid types using subretinal injections in mice. Assays of morphology, inflammation, and physiology were performed. Pathological effects on photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were observed. Müller glia and microglia were activated, and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were up-regulated. There was a strong correlation between cis-regulatory sequences and toxicity. AAVs with any one of three broadly active promoters, or an RPE-specific promoter, were toxic, while AAVs with four different photoreceptor-specific promoters were not toxic at the highest doses tested. There was little correlation between toxicity and transgene, capsid type, preparation method, or cellular contaminants within a preparation. The toxic effect was dose-dependent, with the RPE being more sensitive than photoreceptors. Our results suggest that ocular AAV toxicity is associated with certain AAV cis-regulatory sequences and/or their activity and that retinal damage occurs due to responses by the RPE and/or microglia. By applying multiple, sensitive assays of toxicity, AAV vectors can be designed so that they can be used safely at high dose, potentially providing greater therapeutic efficacy.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1821000116

    View details for Web of Science ID 000461679000086

    View details for PubMedID 30833387

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6431174

  • Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Ophthalmology. Retina Wang, S. K., Sun, P., Tandias, R. M., Seto, B. K., Arroyo, J. G. 2019; 3 (2): 154-160

    Abstract

    TOPIC: A meta-analysis comparing mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists (eplerenone or spironolactone) versus observation or placebo in the treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) based on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and subretinal fluid (SRF) level data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs).CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Central serous chorioretinopathy patients may demonstrate decreased visual acuity, reduced contrast sensitivity, scotomas, and metamorphopsia. Although multiple treatment options for CSCR have been proposed, compelling evidence for any particular method is still lacking.METHODS: Three databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and BIOSIS) were searched for potentially relevant records as of March 2018. Of 114 unique studies identified, 5 RCTs comparing BCVA with either eplerenone or spironolactone versus observation or placebo were included. The quality of articles was assessed according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool, with any discrepancies resolved by author consensus.RESULTS: A total of 145 eyes of patients with CSCR were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with placebo or observation, MR antagonist treatment showed a significant positive effect on BCVA after both 1 month (weighted mean difference [WMD], -0.05 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.07 to -0.02 logMAR; Z= 3.94; P < 0.0001) and 2 months (WMD, -0.10 logMAR; 95% CI, -0.14 to -0.06 logMAR; Z= 4.69; P < 0.00001). Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist treatment also significantly reduced SRF height in CSCR at 1 month (WMD, -81.15 mum; 95% CI, -148.25 to -14.05 mum; Z= 2.37; P=0.02). However, this effect was no longer significant at 2 months (WMD, -58.63 mum; 95% CI, -155.40 to 38.13 mum; Z= 1.19; P= 0.23). None of the patients in the 5 trials withdrew because of adverse effects, and blood electrolyte levels, including potassium, remained normal in all cases.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a modest benefit with MR antagonist therapy for CSCR patients in improving BCVA. We anticipate that MR antagonists will be well tolerated by most CSCR patients and that barriers to starting a trial of these medications in nonresolving CSCR should be low.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.oret.2018.09.003

    View details for PubMedID 31014765

  • Incidence of and Factors Associated With Myopia and High Myopia in Chinese Children, Based on Refraction Without Cycloplegia JAMA OPHTHALMOLOGY Wang, S. K., Guo, Y., Liao, C., Chen, Y., Su, G., Zhang, G., Zhang, L., He, M. 2018; 136 (9): 1017-1024

    Abstract

    Myopia has reached epidemic levels among children in regions of East and Southeast Asia. High myopia is associated with myopic macular degeneration, glaucoma, and retinal detachment.To determine the incidence of myopia and high myopia based on refraction without cycloplegia among children in primary and junior high schools in China.This observational cohort study was completed in Guangzhou, China. It consisted of a cohort from 19 primary schools, who were followed up from 2010 to 2015, and a cohort from 22 junior high schools, who were followed up from 2010 to 2012. All schools were randomly chosen at rates proportional to the number of schools in each of the city's 11 districts. Students with or without myopia in grade 1 (primary school) or grade 7 (junior high school) were eligible for inclusion. Data analysis occurred from February 2017 to October 2017.Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent refraction (SER) of -0.50 diopters (D) or less, as measured by subjective refraction without cycloplegia; high myopia was defined as a SER of -6.0 D or less. Annual incidences were defined as the proportion of participants each year found to have myopia or high myopia who did not previously have the condition. Height, weight, axial length (AL), corneal radius of curvature (CRC), and AL/CRC ratio were examined to assess if these measures were associated with future myopia or high myopia.A total of 4741 students with or without myopia in either grade 1 for the primary school cohort (mean [SD] age 7.2 [0.4] years; 932 of 1975 [47.2%] female) or grade 7 for the junior high school cohort (mean [SD] age 13.2 [0.5] years; 1254 of 2670 [47.0%] female) were included. Baseline mean (SD) SER was 0.31 (0.86) D among 1975 students in grade 1 vs -1.60 (2.00) D among 2670 students in grade 7. Baseline prevalence of myopia was 12.0% in grade 1 students (n = 237 of 1969) and 67.4% in grade 7 students (n = 1795 of 2663). The incidence of myopia was 20% to 30% each year throughout both cohorts. The incidence of high myopia was initially less than 1% in the primary school cohort (grade 1: n = 2 of 1825; 0.1% [95% CI, 0.0%-0.3%]), but incidence exceeded 2% in the junior high school cohort (in grade 9: n = 48 of 2044; 2.3% [95% CI, 1.0%-3.7%]).The incidence of myopia among Chinese students based on refraction without cycloplegia is among the highest of any cultural or ethnic group. If confirmed with cycloplegic refraction, interventions to prevent myopia onset in Chinese populations should be initiated in primary schools.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.2658

    View details for Web of Science ID 000444641800015

    View details for PubMedID 29978185

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6142978

  • Qualitative and quantitative assessment of posterior segment optical coherence tomography images using standard photos: the Liwan Eye Study BMJ OPEN Wang, S. K., Guo, X., Xiao, O., Chen, Y., Liu, R., Huang, W., He, M. 2017; 7 (12): e017923

    Abstract

    To develop a standardised grading scheme, using standard photos, for spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the posterior eye and evaluate the interobserver agreement among trained ophthalmologists in identifying pathological changes.Subjects were recruited from Liwan District, Guangzhou, with SD-OCT data collection from June 2013 to November 2013 as part of 10-year follow-up visits from the Liwan Eye Study. All subjects underwent SD-OCT imaging of the macula with scanning lines analysed by two ophthalmologists to assess for the presence of 12 different posterior segment lesions. Per cent agreement for each lesion between the graders and quantitative measures of dome-shaped macula (DSM) height and choroidal thickness were calculated.A total of 679 SD-OCT images from 679 subjects were independently evaluated by the two graders. Each of the 12 lesions was successfully graded as present or absent in over 96% of images. For all lesions, per cent agreement between observers was over 90%, ranging from 90.7% for epiretinal membranes and retinal pigment epithelium thickenings to 99.7% for full thickness macular holes and retinal detachments. Quantitative measurements of DSM height and choroidal thickness at three locations of the eye all exhibited intraclass correlation scores between the two graders of greater than 0.9.Our study demonstrates high concordance between graders in characterising posterior segment lesions using SD-OCT images, validating the continued use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of posterior eye disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017923

    View details for Web of Science ID 000423826700087

    View details for PubMedID 29275341

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5770917

  • Trends in Hospitalization and Incidence Rate for Syphilitic Uveitis in the United States from 1998-2009. American journal of ophthalmology Albini, T., Callaway, N. F., Pershing, S., Wang, S. K., Moshfeghi, A. A., Moshfeghi, D. M. 2017

    Abstract

    This study evaluates the annual incidence of syphilitic uveitis in the US and trends in hospital admissions over time.Retrospective, longitudinal incidence rate analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data from 1998 to 2009.The NIS is a de-identified, random sample dataset of inpatient hospitalizations from 46 states. The number of cases of syphilitic uveitis was defined by (1) International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) code for syphilis and uveitis or (2) ICD-9 code for syphilitic uveitis. Annual case count, incidence rate, and trend over time were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate associated factors for a syphilitic uveitis diagnosis.The study included 455 310 286 hospitalizations during a 12-year study period with a mean of 37 942 524 patients annually. Syphilis and uveitis was recorded for 1861 patients (155 annually) and syphilitic uveitis was diagnosed in 204 subjects (average of 17 cases annually). There was no change in the incidence of syphilitic uveitis, using either definition, over the study period (P for trend = .46). The mean annual incidence of syphilis and uveitis was 0.0004%, or 4 per million. Syphilitic uveitis had an annual incidence of 0.000045%, or 0.45 per million. The odds of syphilitic uveitis were lower among women (odds ratio [OR] 0.40, CI 0.28-0.57) and increased with comorbid acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (OR 4.52, CI 3.01-6.79).We report the first incidence of syphilitic uveitis in the United States. Fortunately, this remains a rare condition. The results demonstrate no change in the number of inpatient admissions for syphilitic uveitis during the study period.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajo.2017.05.013

    View details for PubMedID 28549847

  • Comparison of Peristat Online Perimetry with the Humphrey Perimetry in a Clinic-Based Setting TRANSLATIONAL VISION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Lowry, E. A., Hou, J., Hennein, L., Chang, R. T., Lin, S., Keenan, J., Wang, S. K., Ianchulev, S., Pasquale, L. R., Han, Y. 2016; 5 (4)

    Abstract

    We determined the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for Peristat online perimetry at detecting varying degrees of glaucoma and the correlation between Peristat online perimetry and Humphrey visual field.A prospective, comparative study of Peristat online perimetry (an achromatic static computer threshold testing program) and Humphrey visual field (HVF) 24-2 SITA standard testing was performed by 63 glaucoma patients and 30 healthy controls in random order. The number of total adjacent abnormal test points were identified for each test, and compared with Spearman correlation. Receive operating characteristic curves were generated for Peristat online perimetry detection of mild and moderate-severe glaucoma patients using contrast sensitivity thresholds of -16.7, -21.7, and -26.7 dB.The area under the ROC curve for glaucoma detection ranged from 0.77 to 0.81 for mild disease (mean deviation [MD], >-6 dB on HVF) and 0.85 to 0.87 for moderate to severe disease (MD, <-6 dB on HVF) depending on contrast threshold. Peristat online perimetry and Humphrey visual field abnormal points were highly correlated with Spearman rank correlations ranging from 0.55 to 0.77 (all P < 0.001).Peristat online perimetry exhibits a reasonable ROC curve without specialized equipment and exhibited significant correlation with the conventional 24° Humphrey visual field test.Low cost widely available internet-based visual fields may complement traditional office-based visual field testing.

    View details for DOI 10.1167/tvst.5.4.4

    View details for Web of Science ID 000388670600004

    View details for PubMedID 27486554

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4959820

  • Hoxb5 marks long-term haematopoietic stem cells and reveals a homogenous perivascular niche NATURE Chen, J. Y., Miyanishi, M., Wang, S. K., Yamazaki, S., Sinha, R., Kao, K. S., Seita, J., Sahoo, D., Nakauchi, H., Weissman, I. L. 2016; 530 (7589): 223-?

    Abstract

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are arguably the most extensively characterized tissue stem cells. Since the identification of HSCs by prospective isolation, complex multi-parameter flow cytometric isolation of phenotypic subsets has facilitated studies on many aspects of HSC biology, including self-renewal, differentiation, ageing, niche, and diversity. Here we demonstrate by unbiased multi-step screening, identification of a single gene, homeobox B5 (Hoxb5, also known as Hox-2.1), with expression in the bone marrow that is limited to long-term (LT)-HSCs in mice. Using a mouse single-colour tri-mCherry reporter driven by endogenous Hoxb5 regulation, we show that only the Hoxb5(+) HSCs exhibit long-term reconstitution capacity after transplantation in primary transplant recipients and, notably, in secondary recipients. Only 7-35% of various previously defined immunophenotypic HSCs are LT-HSCs. Finally, by in situ imaging of mouse bone marrow, we show that >94% of LT-HSCs (Hoxb5(+)) are directly attached to VE-cadherin(+) cells, implicating the perivascular space as a near-homogenous location of LT-HSCs.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nature16943

    View details for Web of Science ID 000369916700040

    View details for PubMedID 26863982

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4854608

  • SUNDROP: six years of screening for retinopathy of prematurity with telemedicine. Canadian journal of ophthalmology. Journal canadien d'ophtalmologie Wang, S. K., Callaway, N. F., Wallenstein, M. B., Henderson, M. T., Leng, T., Moshfeghi, D. M. 2015; 50 (2): 101-106

    Abstract

    To report the 6-year results of the Stanford University Network for Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (SUNDROP) initiative in the context of telemedicine screening initiatives for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).A retrospective analysis.Premature newborns requiring ROP screening at 6 neonatal intensive care units from December 1, 2005, to November 30, 2011.Infants were evaluated via remote retinal photography by an ROP specialist. A total of 608 preterm infants meeting ROP examination criteria were screened with the RetCam II/III (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, Calif.). Primary outcomes were treatment-warranted ROP (TW-ROP) and adverse anatomical events.During the 6 years, 1216 total eyes were screened during 2169 examinations, generating 26 970 retinal images, an average of 3.56 examinations and 44.28 images per patient. Twenty-two (3.6%) of the infants screened met criteria for TW-ROP. Compared with bedside binocular ophthalmoscopy, remote interpretation of RetCam II/III images had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 99.8%, positive predicative value of 95.5%, and negative predicative value of 100% for the detection of TW-ROP. No adverse anatomical outcomes were observed for any enrolled patient.The 6-year results for the SUNDROP telemedicine initiative were highly favourable with respect to diagnostic accuracy. Telemedicine appears to be a safe, reliable, and cost-effective complement to the efforts of ROP specialists, capable of increasing patient access to screening and focusing the resources of the current ophthalmic community on infants with potentially vision-threatening disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcjo.2014.11.005

    View details for PubMedID 25863848

  • Gender differences in compensation in academic medicine: the results from four neurological specialties within the University of California Healthcare System SCIENTOMETRICS Henderson, M. T., Fijalkowski, N., Wang, S. K., Maltenfort, M., Zheng, L. L., Ratliff, J., Moshfeghi, A. A., Moshfeghi, D. M. 2014; 100 (1): 297-306
  • Stanford University Network for Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (SUNDROP): five years of screening with telemedicine. Ophthalmic surgery, lasers & imaging retina Fijalkowski, N., Zheng, L. L., Henderson, M. T., Wang, S. K., Wallenstein, M. B., Leng, T., Moshfeghi, D. M. 2014; 45 (2): 106-113

    Abstract

    To report the 5-year results of the Stanford University Network for Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (SUNDROP) telemedicine initiative.Infants requiring retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening at six neonatal intensive care units from December 1, 2005, to November 30, 2010, were evaluated with remote retinal photography by an ROP specialist. Every infant received outpatient binocular indirect ophthalmoscope examinations until termination criteria were achieved or until treatment. Outcomes were treatment-warranted ROP (TW-ROP, ETROP type 1) and adverse anatomical events.Five hundred eleven infants (1,022 eyes) were screened. Fifteen infants had TW-ROP and underwent laser photocoagulation. The TW-ROP cohort had significantly lower birth weight and gestational age (both P < .001). No patient progressed to adverse anatomical outcomes and no case of TW-ROP was missed. Tele-medicine had 100% sensitivity, 99.8% specificity, 93.8% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value for detection of TW-ROP.Telemedicine demonstrates high diagnostic accuracy for detection of TW-ROP and can complement ROP screening. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:106-113.].

    View details for DOI 10.3928/23258160-20140122-01

    View details for PubMedID 24444469

  • An emerging treatment option for glaucoma: Rho kinase inhibitors. Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) Wang, S. K., Chang, R. T. 2014; 8: 883-890

    Abstract

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors are a novel potential class of glaucoma therapeutics with multiple compounds currently in Phase II and III US Food and Drug Administration trials in the United States. These selective agents work by relaxing the trabecular meshwork through inhibition of the actin cytoskeleton contractile tone of smooth muscle. This results in increased aqueous outflow directly through the trabecular meshwork, achieving lower intraocular pressures in a range similar to prostaglandins. There are also animal studies indicating that ROCK inhibitors may improve blood flow to the optic nerve, increase ganglion cell survival, and reduce bleb scarring in glaucoma surgery. Given the multiple beneficial effects for glaucoma patients, ROCK inhibitors are certainly a highly anticipated emerging treatment option for glaucoma.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/OPTH.S41000

    View details for PubMedID 24872673

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4025933

  • Discovery and diagnostic value of a novel oncofetal protein: glypican 3. Advances in anatomic pathology Wang, S. K., Zynger, D. L., Hes, O. n., Yang, X. J. 2014; 21 (6): 450–60

    Abstract

    Glypican 3 is a membrane-bound heparan sulfate proteoglycan, which has recently been identified as a marker for liver cancer and germ cell malignancies. Individuals with loss-of-function mutations for the glypican 3 gene exhibit Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, a rare X-linked overgrowth disorder. Expression of glypican 3 mRNA and protein is normally silenced in most adult organs and may reappear during malignant transformation. In the past few years, immunohistochemical and molecular characteristics of glypican 3 in hepatocellular carcinoma have been elucidated. More recently, glypican 3 has been emerging as a new diagnostic marker for germ cell tumors and especially testicular and ovarian yolk sac tumors. However, in other tumors such as renal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and melanomas, studies disagree on the level of glypican 3 expression. Finally, there is the controversial notion of glypican 3 as a tumor suppressor gene. In this review article, we update current knowledge on glypican 3 expression in normal and neoplastic tissues, evaluate its utility as a tumor marker in clinical practice, and explore its role as a novel oncofetal protein with clinical implications. Our focus is on the diagnostic value of glypican 3 in germ cell tumors and other neoplasms in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma. In conclusion, glypican 3 has been proven to be a useful immunohistochemical marker in distinguishing yolk sac tumors, choriocarcinomas, and Wilms tumors from other malignancies histologically mimicking these primitive tumors. Clinically, we recommend that glypican 3 be used as part of a panel of markers in subtyping testicular germ cell tumors.

    View details for PubMedID 25299314

  • A new paradigm for incorporating the joint statement screening guidelines for retinopathy of prematurity into clinical practice: outcomes from a quaternary referral program. Ophthalmic surgery, lasers & imaging retina Henderson, M. T., Wang, S. K., Moshfeghi, D. M. 2013; 44 (5): 442-447

    Abstract

    This study examines patient experience at a quaternary referral pediatric clinic with a retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening program that monitors infants at least on a weekly basis for any stage of ROP.Admission records of 399 prematurely born patients treated at the Byers Eye Institute outpatient ROP clinic were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were categorized according to ROP status and whether they completed, canceled, or failed to show up for scheduled examinations. Demographic information was collected from medical records.Of 1,823 scheduled ROP-related visits, 327 (17.9%) resulted in cancellations and 90 (4.9%) in no-shows, with 238 missed visits due to caregiver-related and 149 due to caregiver-unrelated reasons. Of 399 total patients, 142 (35.6%) canceled or failed to show up for at least one appointment because of caregiver-related reasons.More than one-third of patients with ROP canceled or missed appointments. The true risk of delay is difficult to assess because all patients requiring treatment received it prior to discharge from the hospital. To achieve maximal compliance with joint statement guidelines on ROP screening, patients should be scheduled for examination earlier than recommended. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2013;44:442-447.].

    View details for DOI 10.3928/23258160-20130909-04

    View details for PubMedID 24044706

  • Comparison of Web-based Perimetry and office-based Humphrey Visual Field (HVF) in Patients with Glaucoma Hou, J., Wang, S., Keenan, J., Chon, B., Subramanian, N., Ianchulev, T., Stamper, R., Chang, R., Han, Y. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2013
  • Clinical Utility of Web-based Office and Home Peristat for the Detection of Visual Field Defects in Patients with Glaucoma Wang, S., Hou, J., Ianchulev, S., Chon, B., Han, Y., Chang, R. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2013