Bio


Professor Goldman is an educational anthropologist interested in the idea that learning takes place when students are actively engaged with each other, their teachers, and others in conversations, activities, content, and technologies. She is very interested in the power of real-world contexts to drive learning, and researches how people learn in and out of school. Goldman’s work focuses on creating opportunities for rich STEM learning, and for understanding how design thinking and technologies can create access and be transformational. Current work includes broadening participation in STEM via family activities, design-based engagements, and through empathy work with scientists doing outreach.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Professor (Teaching) of Mechanical Engineering (by courtesy), Stanford University (2006 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Elementary and Middle School Teacher, Teacher (1973 - 1977)
  • Director, Public Schools Project, College for Human Services (1983 - 1985)
  • Research Scientist, Center for Children and Technology, Bank Street College of Education (1985 - 1989)
  • Director of School and Community Programs and Senior Research Scientist, Institute for Research on Learning (1989 - 2000)

Professional Education


  • BS, State University of New York at Oneonta, Elementary Education and Educational Psychology (1973)
  • MS, Florida International University, Urban School Administration and Supervision (1978)
  • MEd, Columbia University, Family and Community Education (1979)
  • EdD, Columbia University, Family and Community Education (1982)

Community and International Work


  • SKY Labo, Japan and US

    Topic

    Japanese girls and STEAM Learning

    Partnering Organization(s)

    SKY Labo

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • D.loft STEM Learning

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • English Learners and Design Thinking

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • REDlab

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • STEM Ambassador Program

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Playful Family Science

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research Interests


  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Elementary Education
  • Equity in Education
  • Gender Issues
  • Math Education
  • Parents and Family Issues
  • Research Methods
  • Science Education
  • Technology and Education

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Professor Goldman is an educational anthropologist interested in the idea that learning takes place when students are actively engaged with each other, their teachers, and others in conversations, activities, content, and technologies. She is very interested in the power of real-world contexts to drive learning, and researches how people learn in and out of school. Goldman’s work focuses on creating opportunities for rich STEM learning, and for understanding how design thinking and technologies can create access and be transformational. Current work includes bringing broadening participation in STEM via family activities, design-based engagements, and through empathy work with scientists doing outreach.

2022-23 Courses


Stanford Advisees


All Publications


  • Opportunities and tensions in family science: challenging dominant paradigms of science education CULTURAL STUDIES OF SCIENCE EDUCATION Goldman, S., Luce, M. R., Vea, T. 2020
  • Designing for Family Science Explorations Anytime, Anywhere SCIENCE EDUCATION Luce, M. R., Goldman, S., Vea, T. 2017; 101 (2): 251-277

    View details for DOI 10.1002/sce.21259

    View details for Web of Science ID 000394903000004

  • CAPTURING MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDINGS OF DESIGN THINKING TAKING DESIGN THINKING TO SCHOOL: HOW THE TECHNOLOGY OF DESIGN CAN TRANSFORM TEACHERS, LEARNERS, AND CLASSROOMS Goldman, S., Zielezinski, M. B., Vea, T., Bachas-Daunert, S., Kabayadondo, Z., Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z. 2017: 76–93
  • TAKING DESIGN THINKING TO SCHOOL How the Technology of Design Can Transform Teachers, Learners, and Classrooms TAKING DESIGN THINKING TO SCHOOL: HOW THE TECHNOLOGY OF DESIGN CAN TRANSFORM TEACHERS, LEARNERS, AND CLASSROOMS Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z., Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z. 2017: 3–19
  • A PRAXIS MODEL FOR DESIGN THINKING Catalyzing Life Readiness TAKING DESIGN THINKING TO SCHOOL: HOW THE TECHNOLOGY OF DESIGN CAN TRANSFORM TEACHERS, LEARNERS, AND CLASSROOMS Estrada, C., Goldman, S., Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z. 2017: 37–49
  • Participatory Design Research as a Practice for Systemic Repair: Doing Hand-in-Hand Math Research with Families COGNITION AND INSTRUCTION Booker, A., Goldman, S. 2016; 34 (3): 222-235
  • Participating in Two Video Concussion Education Programs Sequentially Improves Concussion-Reporting Intention. Neurotrauma reports Daneshvar, D. H., Baugh, C. M., Lama, R. D., Yutsis, M., Pea, R. D., Goldman, S., Grant, G. A., Cantu, R. C., Sanders, L. M., Zafonte, R. D., Hainline, B., Sorcar, P. 2021; 2 (1): 581-591

    Abstract

    Undiagnosed concussions increase the risk of additional concussion and persistent symptoms from concussion. Because there are no reliable objective markers of concussion, self-reporting of subjective and non-visible symptoms are critical to ensuring proper concussion management. For this reason, educational interventions target concussion reporting, but the majority of studies have examined the efficacy of single educational interventions or compared interventions to one another. This randomized crossover study sought to identify whether there was benefit to administering multiple concussion education programs in tandem, back to back. The study randomized 313 male high school football players to first receive CrashCourse concussion education (CC) or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention video concussion education (CDC) followed by crossover with the other education. Athlete concussion-reporting intention, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and enjoyment of education were assessed at baseline and after each intervention. There were statistically significant improvements across all measures, both after single intervention and crossover (all p < 0.001). Secondary analyses examining differences between education found that athletes reported higher enjoyment of concussion education immediately after participating in CC, as compared to CDC (p < 0.001). These findings demonstrate an additive benefit to implementing CC and CDC education in tandem, without decrement in enjoyment of concussion education after experiencing dual educations; in fact, enjoyment of concussion education improved after receiving education programs back to back. These educational programs appear to complement one another, and the results support the use of multi-modal concussion education to differentially target and maximize concussion reporting.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/neur.2021.0033

    View details for PubMedID 35018360

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8742279

  • Participating in Two Video Concussion Education Programs Sequentially Improves Concussion-Reporting Intention NEUROTRAUMA REPORTS Daneshvar, D. H., Baugh, C. M., Lama, R. D., Yutsis, M., Pea, R. D., Goldman, S., Grant, G. A., Cantu, R. C., Sanders, L. M., Zafonte, R. D., Hainline, B., Sorcar, P. 2021; 2 (1): 581-591
  • Evaluating the Effect of Concussion Education Programs on Intent to Report Concussion in High School Football. Journal of athletic training Daneshvar, D. H., Yutsis, M., Baugh, C. M., Pea, R. D., Goldman, S., Grant, G. A., Ghajar, J., Sanders, L. M., Chen, C., Tenekedjieva, L., Gurrapu, S., Zafonte, R. D., Sorcar, P. 2021

    Abstract

    CONTEXT: Concussion underreporting leads to delays in diagnosis and treatment, prolonging recovery time. Athletes' self-report of concussion symptoms therefore reduces risk.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the efficacy of three concussion education programs in improving concussion-reporting intention.DESIGN: Randomized controlled clinical trial with assessment immediately and one-month after education.SETTING: Three high schools in California.PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: 118 male football players were randomly assigned to receive concussion education via: CrashCourse (CC), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) video educational materials (Vi), or CDC written educational materials (Wr).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Concussion-reporting intention was assessed at baseline, immediately after education, and at one-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included concussion knowledge, attitudes, perceived reporting norms, and perceived behavioral control.RESULTS: Athletes across all educational formats had significant improvement in concussion-reporting intention immediately following education and at one-month follow-up (mean improvement 6.8% and 11.4%, respectively; p<0.001). Similar findings were observed across all education formats in secondary analyses examining knowledge, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control. However, there were significant differences by education and time (p=0.03). On post-hoc analysis, athletes who received CC had increased concussion-reporting intention immediately and at one-month (baseline=4.7, immediate=6.1, one-month=6.0; p=0.007 compared to significant increases only at one-month for CDC-Vi (baseline=4.3, immediate=5.2, one-month=5.8; p=0.001), and no significant improvement for CDC-Wr (p=0.10). Secondary analyses indicated significant differences between CC and both CDC interventions, in concussion knowledge and attitudes, immediately after education and at one-month. There were no significant differences in perceived behavioral control between-interventions or in perceived concussion-reporting norms across or between interventions.CONCLUSION: All athletes exhibited improved intent to report concussions, increased concussion knowledge, better concussion attitudes, and more perceived behavioral control, both immediately after education and at one-month follow-up. However, athletes randomized to CC reported greater intent to report concussion, more knowledge, and improved concussion-reporting attitudes, when compared to CDC-Vi and CDC-Wr.TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov trial ID number is XXX.

    View details for DOI 10.4085/509-20

    View details for PubMedID 33428746

  • Athlete Enjoyment of Prior Education Moderates change in Concussion-Reporting Intention after Interactive Education. Inquiry : a journal of medical care organization, provision and financing Daneshvar, D. H., Baugh, C. M., Yutsis, M., Pea, R. D., Goldman, S., Grant, G. A., Cantu, R. C., Sanders, L. M., Chen, C. L., Lama, R. D., Zafonte, R. D., Sorcar, P. 2021; 58: 469580211022641

    Abstract

    Undiagnosed concussions increase risk of additional injuries and can prolong recovery. Because of the difficulties recognizing concussive symptoms, concussion education must specifically target improving athlete concussion reporting. Many concussion education programs are designed without significant input from athletes, resulting in a less enjoyable athlete experience, with potential implications on program efficacy. Athlete enjoyment of previous concussion education programs moderates the improvement in concussion-reporting intention after experiencing the research version of CrashCourse (CC) concussion education. Prospective cohort study. Level of evidence: Level IV. Quantitative assessment utilizing ANOVA with moderation analysis of 173 male high school football players, aged 13 to 17, who completed baseline assessments of concussion knowledge, concussion reporting, and attitudes about prior educational interventions. Athletes were subsequently shown CC, before a follow-up assessment was administered assessing the same domains. At baseline, only 58.5% of athletes reported that they enjoyed their previous concussion education. After CC, athletes were significantly more likely to endorse that they would report a suspected concussion (from 69.3% of athletes to 85.6%; P<.01). Enjoyment of previous concussion education moderated concussion-reporting intention after CC (P=.02), with CC having a greater effect on concussion-reporting intention in athletes with low enjoyment of previous concussion education (b=0.21, P=.02), than on individuals with high enjoyment of previous concussion education (P=.99). Enjoyment of CC did not have a moderating effect on concussion-reporting intention. Athletes who previously did not enjoy concussion education exhibited greater gains in concussion-reporting intention than athletes who enjoyed previous education. Given the potential risks associated with undiagnosed concussions, concussion education has sought to improve concussion reporting. Because most athletes participate in concussion education programs due to league or state mandates, improving concussion-reporting intention in these low-enjoyment athletes is of particular relevance to improving concussion-reporting intention broadly.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/00469580211022641

    View details for PubMedID 34053328

  • Using a picture-embedded method to support acquisition of sight words LEARNING AND INSTRUCTION Strauber, C., Sorcar, P., Howlett, C., Goldman, S. 2020; 65
  • Beyond the Deficit Model: The Ambassador Approach to Public Engagement BIOSCIENCE Nadkarni, N. M., Weber, C. Q., Goldman, S. V., Schatz, D. L., Allen, S., Menlove, R. 2019; 69 (4): 305–13
  • Staying the course with video analysis Video research in the learning sciences Goldman, S., McDermott, R. 2017
  • 3 The Production of Learning Stories Through Comic Making Deep Stories Goldman, S., Zielezinski, M. B. JSTOR. 2017: 36–59
  • Design thinking In Peppler, K. (Ed), The SAGE encyclopedia of out-of-school learning Goldman, S. Los Angeles: Sage Publishing. 2017
  • Design thinking Deep stories: Practicing, teaching, and learning anthropology with digital storytelling Goldman, S., Zielezinski, M. DeGruyter Open. 2017
  • Taking design thinking to school: How the technology of design can transform teachers, learners, and classrooms Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z. Routledge. 2017
  • Exploring the promise and limits of a reciprocal research and design process: the case of family math applications Design as scholarship: Case studies from the learning sciences. Goldman, S., Jimenez, O. Routledge. 2016
  • Teaching with Design Thinking: Developing New Vision and Approaches to Twenty-First Century Learning Connecting Science and Engineering Education Practices in Meaningful Ways Goldman, S., Zielezinski, M. B. Springer. 2016; this is book edition: 237–262
  • Student teams in search of design thinking Design thinking research: building innovation eco-systems Goldman, S., Kabayadondo, Z., Royalty, A., Carroll, M. P., Roth, B. Springer International Publishing. 2014
  • Math I am: What we learn from stories that people tell about math in their lives LOST opportunities: Learning in out of school time Esmonde, I., Blair, K. P., Goldman, S., Martin, L., Jimenez, O., Pea, R. Springer Netherlands. 2013
  • Assessing d.learning: Capturing the journey of becoming a design thinker Directions in design thinking research Goldman, S., Carroll, M., Kabayadondo, Z., Britos Cavanaro, L., Royalty, A., Roth, B., Kwek, S., Kim, J. Springer. 2012
  • Assessing d. learning: Capturing the journey of becoming a design thinker Design Thinking Research: Measuring Performance in Context Goldman, S., Carroll, M. P., Kabayadondo, Z., Cavagnaro, L. B., Royalty, A. W., Roth, B., Kim, J. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2012
  • Destination, Imagination and the Fires Within: Design Thinking in a Middle School Classroom INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION Carroll, M., Goldman, S., Britos, L., Koh, J., Royalty, A., Hornstein, M. 2010; 29 (1): 37-53
  • Family inheritance: Parallel practices of financial responsibility in families Educating comprehensively: varieties of educational experiences, Vol. 3 of the Perspectives on comprehensive education series Martin, L., Goldman, S. The Edwin Mellon Press. 2010
  • Math engaged problem solving in families Learning in the disciplines: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) Goldman, S., Pea, R., Blair, K. P., Jimenez, O., Booker, A., Martin, L., Esmonde, I. edited by Gomez, K., Lyons, L., Radinsky, J. International Society of the Learning Sciences: Chicago IL.. 2010: 380–388
  • Making Math a Definition of the Situation: Families as Sites for Mathematical Practices ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY Goldman, S., Booker, A. 2009; 40 (4): 369-387
  • Destination, Imagination & The Fires Within: Design Thinking in a Middle School Classroom ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2009 Goldman, S., Carroll, M., Royalty, A. ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY. 2009: 371–372
  • Educating New Learning Technology Designers Di Giano, C., Goldman, S., Chorost, M. Routledge. 2009
  • The Tanda: A Practice at the Intersection of Mathematics, Culture, and Financial Goals MIND CULTURE AND ACTIVITY Martin, L., Goldman, S., Jimenez, O. 2009; 16 (4): 338-352
  • Mixing the digital, social and cultural: Learning, identity and agency in youth participation Digital youth: Learning and identity Goldman, S., Booker, A., McDermott, M. MIT Press. 2007
  • A new angle on families: connecting the mathematics in daily life with school mathematics Learning in places: The informal education reader Goldman, S. Peter Lang Publishing Group. 2006
  • The cultural work of learning disabilities Educational Researcher McDermott, R., Goldman, S., Varenne, H. 2006; 35 (6): 12-17
  • Functioning in the wireless classroom 2nd IEEE International Workshop on Wireless and Mobile Technologies in Education (WMTE) Goldman, S. V., Pea, R., Maldonado, H., Martin, L., White, T. IEEE COMPUTER SOC. 2004: 75–82
  • Emerging social engineering in the wireless classroom 6th International Conference of the Learning Sciences Goldman, S., Pea, R., Maldonado, H. LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOC PUBL. 2004: 222–229
  • Negotiating the meaning of representations in the mathematics classroom 6th International Conference of the Learning Sciences Tackman, J. A., Goldman, S. V. LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOC PUBL. 2004: 640–640
  • Using assessments to improve equity in mathematics EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP Cole, K., Coffey, J., Goldman, S. 1999; 56 (6): 56-58