Bio


As a practicing gastroenterologist and researcher specializing in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease without medical cure and whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood, I am keenly aware of the resultant limitations and risks of existing IBD therapies. It is precisely this need—the need to offer patients improved treatment options by better understanding the underlying causes of IBD and its impact on patients—that motivates me and is a focus of my research. With a unique background with formal training in Biodesign (medical technology assessment and development) and postdoctoral training in translational immunology, I am particularly interested in developing and applying novel solutions to alleviate intestinal inflammatory conditions.

There are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

(1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

(2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

Clinical Focus


  • Gastroenterology
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Crohn's Disease
  • Microscopic Colitis
  • Pouchitis
  • Global Health
  • Biodesign, Low-cost devices

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director of Digital Health and Innovation, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology Stanford University School of Medicine (2019 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Gastroenterology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2014)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2010)
  • Fellowship:Stanford Hospital and Clinics (2014) CA
  • Fellowship, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (Crohn's & Colitis Foundation Visiting IBD Fellow Program), Inflammatory Bowel Disease (2013)
  • Fellowship:Stanford Biodesign Program (2011) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2010) CA
  • Medical Education:University of California San Francisco (2007) CA
  • BA, Harvard University (1997)

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


There are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

(1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

(2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

Clinical Trials


  • The Role of Secondary Bile Acids in Intestinal Inflammation Recruiting

    The cause of Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but intestinal bacteria-involved in the production of molecules that impact health-are widely accepted to play a key role. A significant proportion of IBD patients with pouches (surgically created rectums after the diseased colon is removed) continue to have inflammation similar to their previous disease. Only a few microbes are known to have the capability to modify primary bile acids (PBAs) made by the liver to secondary bile acids (SBAs). SBAs are some of the most common metabolites in the colon and play key roles in several diseases. In this study the investigators will investigate if ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may reduce inflammatory markers and improve quality of life (as assessed by validate survey) in those subjects with active antibiotic refractory pouchitis.

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  • Effects of an Intermittent Reduced Calorie Diet on Crohn's Disease Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to see how an Intermittent Calorie Reduced Diet (IRCD) that mimics fasting effects inflammation in patients with mild to moderate Crohn's disease (CD). The diet may allow users to receive the benefits of fasting while also being able to enjoy food (the ingredients of which are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Research on dietary interventions and CD are very limited. Diets that mimick fasting have been studied with support of the National Institute of Health and published in leading journals. This research investigates whether markers of inflammation decrease and/or quality of life increases after five-day periods of the IRCD, and may provide rationale for its use to treat CD.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Karolin Jarr, MD, (650) 736 - 7311.

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  • Localized Therapeutics for the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine the patient preference for a biocompatible thermosensitive solution-gel versus water or saline (liquid) enema. The thermosensitive solution-gel is comprised of poloxamer, an inactive compound that is designated as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by FDA. It could subsequently be used as a medium for drug delivery. The poloxamer (gel) is administered to study participants in order to assess preference and proximal distribution.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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  • The Influence of a Fasting Mimicking Diet on Ulcerative Colitis Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to see how a diet that mimics fasting effects inflammation in patients with mild to moderate Ulcerative Colitis (UC). The diet may allow users to receive the benefits of fasting while also being able to enjoy food (the ingredients of which are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Research on dietary interventions and UC are very limited. Fasting mimicking diets (FMD) have been studied with support of the National Institute of Health and published in leading journals. This research investigates whether markers of inflammation decrease and/or quality of life increases after three cycles of a five-day period of the fasting mimicking diet, and may provide rationale for its use to treat UC.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Karolin Jarr, MD, (650) 736 - 7311.

    View full details

Stanford Advisees


  • Postdoctoral Faculty Sponsor
    Yan Jiang
  • Postdoctoral Research Mentor
    Yan Jiang

All Publications


  • Mass cytometry reveals systemic and local immune signatures that distinguish inflammatory bowel diseases. Nature communications Rubin, S. J., Bai, L., Haileselassie, Y., Garay, G., Yun, C., Becker, L., Streett, S. E., Sinha, S. R., Habtezion, A. 2019; 10 (1): 2686

    Abstract

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Each disease is characterized by a diverse set of potential manifestations, which determine patients' disease phenotype. Current understanding of phenotype determinants is limited, despite increasing prevalence and healthcare costs. Diagnosis and monitoring of disease requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopy and tissue biopsy. Here we report signatures of heterogeneity between disease diagnoses and phenotypes. Using mass cytometry, we analyze leukocyte subsets, characterize their function(s), and examine gut-homing molecule expression in blood and intestinal tissue from healthy and/or IBD subjects. Some signatures persist in IBD despite remission, and many signatures are highly represented by leukocytes that express gut trafficking molecules. Moreover, distinct systemic and local immune signatures suggest patterns of cell localization in disease. Our findings highlight the importance of gut tropic leukocytes in circulation and reveal that blood-based immune signatures differentiate clinically relevant subsets of IBD.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41467-019-10387-7

    View details for PubMedID 31217423

  • The high resource impact of reformatting requirements for scientific papers. PloS one Jiang, Y., Lerrigo, R., Ullah, A., Alagappan, M., Asch, S. M., Goodman, S. N., Sinha, S. R. 2019; 14 (10): e0223976

    Abstract

    Most research manuscripts are not accepted for publication on first submission. A major part of the resubmission process is reformatting to another journal's specific requirements, a process separate from revising the scientific content. There has been little research to understand the magnitude of the burden imposed by the current resubmission process.We analyzed original research article submission requirements from twelve randomly selected journals in each of eight scientific and clinical focus areas from the InCites Journal Citation Reports database. From the 96 journals selected, we randomly identified three recently published manuscripts and sent surveys to those first and/or corresponding authors (288 total) to solicit information on time spent reformatting resubmissions and opinions on the process.There was significant variation in manuscript submission requirements for journals within the same scientific focus and only 4% of journals offered a fully format-free initial submission. Of 203 authors responding (71.5% response rate), only 11.8% expressed satisfaction with the resubmission process and 91% desired reforming the current system. Time spent on reformatting delays most publications by at least two weeks and by over three months in about 20% of manuscripts. The effort to comply with submission requirements has significant global economic burden, estimated at over $1.1 billion dollars annually when accounting for a research team's time.We demonstrate that there is significant resource utilization associated with resubmitting manuscripts, heretofore not properly quantified. The vast majority of authors are not satisfied with the current process. Addressing these issues by reconciling reformatting requirements among journals or adopting a universal format-free initial submission policy would help resolve a major subject for the scientific research community and provide more efficient dissemination of findings.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0223976

    View details for PubMedID 31665156

  • Age-Related Changes inGut Microbiota AlterPhenotype of Muscularis Macrophages and Disrupt Gastrointestinal Motility. Cellular and molecular gastroenterology and hepatology Becker, L., Spear, E. T., Sinha, S. R., Haileselassie, Y., Habtezion, A. 2019; 7 (1): 243

    View details for PubMedID 30585161

  • Using Social Media to Characterize Public Sentiment Toward Medical Interventions Commonly Used for Cancer Screening: An Observational Study. Journal of medical Internet research Metwally, O., Blumberg, S., Ladabaum, U., Sinha, S. R. 2017; 19 (6)

    Abstract

    Although cancer screening reduces morbidity and mortality, millions of people worldwide remain unscreened. Social media provide a unique platform to understand public sentiment toward tools that are commonly used for cancer screening.The objective of our study was to examine public sentiment toward colonoscopy, mammography, and Pap smear and how this sentiment spreads by analyzing discourse on Twitter.In this observational study, we classified 32,847 tweets (online postings on Twitter) related to colonoscopy, mammography, or Pap smears using a naive Bayes algorithm as containing positive, negative, or neutral sentiment. Additionally, we characterized the spread of sentiment on Twitter using an established model to study contagion.Colonoscopy-related tweets were more likely to express negative than positive sentiment (negative to positive ratio 1.65, 95% CI 1.51-1.80, P<.001), in contrast to the more positive sentiment expressed regarding mammography (negative to positive ratio 0.43, 95% CI 0.39-0.47, P<.001). The proportions of negative versus positive tweets about Pap smear were not significantly different (negative to positive ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.87-1.04, P=.18). Positive and negative tweets tended to share lexical features across screening modalities. Positive tweets expressed resonance with the benefits of early detection. Fear and pain were the principal lexical features seen in negative tweets. Negative sentiment for colonoscopy and mammography spread more than positive sentiment; no correlation with sentiment and spread was seen for Pap smear.Analysis of social media data provides a unique, quantitative framework to better understand the public's perception of medical interventions that are commonly used for cancer screening. Given the growing use of social media, public health interventions to improve cancer screening should use the health perceptions of the population as expressed in social network postings about tests that are frequently used for cancer screening, as well as other people they may influence with such postings.

    View details for DOI 10.2196/jmir.7485

    View details for PubMedID 28592395

  • Using Social Media to Characterize Public Sentiment Toward Medical Interventions Commonly Used for Cancer Screening: An Observational Study. Journal of medical Internet research Metwally, O., Blumberg, S., Ladabaum, U., Sinha, S. R. 2017; 19 (6)

    Abstract

    Although cancer screening reduces morbidity and mortality, millions of people worldwide remain unscreened. Social media provide a unique platform to understand public sentiment toward tools that are commonly used for cancer screening.The objective of our study was to examine public sentiment toward colonoscopy, mammography, and Pap smear and how this sentiment spreads by analyzing discourse on Twitter.In this observational study, we classified 32,847 tweets (online postings on Twitter) related to colonoscopy, mammography, or Pap smears using a naive Bayes algorithm as containing positive, negative, or neutral sentiment. Additionally, we characterized the spread of sentiment on Twitter using an established model to study contagion.Colonoscopy-related tweets were more likely to express negative than positive sentiment (negative to positive ratio 1.65, 95% CI 1.51-1.80, P<.001), in contrast to the more positive sentiment expressed regarding mammography (negative to positive ratio 0.43, 95% CI 0.39-0.47, P<.001). The proportions of negative versus positive tweets about Pap smear were not significantly different (negative to positive ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.87-1.04, P=.18). Positive and negative tweets tended to share lexical features across screening modalities. Positive tweets expressed resonance with the benefits of early detection. Fear and pain were the principal lexical features seen in negative tweets. Negative sentiment for colonoscopy and mammography spread more than positive sentiment; no correlation with sentiment and spread was seen for Pap smear.Analysis of social media data provides a unique, quantitative framework to better understand the public's perception of medical interventions that are commonly used for cancer screening. Given the growing use of social media, public health interventions to improve cancer screening should use the health perceptions of the population as expressed in social network postings about tests that are frequently used for cancer screening, as well as other people they may influence with such postings.

    View details for DOI 10.2196/jmir.7485

    View details for PubMedID 28592395

  • Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients with Concurrent Heart Failure. Digestive diseases and sciences Jiang, Y., Lin, O., Sinha, S. R. 2017; 62 (6): 1597-1606

    Abstract

    Prescribing information for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors, a mainstay of treatment for moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), instructs cautious use in those with heart failure (HF). However, the limited data behind these warnings are inconclusive and should be weighed against mounting evidence demonstrating worse cardiac outcomes in active IBD.To assess whether TNFα inhibitor use is reduced in patients with IBD and HF by analyzing physician practice and prescription patterns.Using a Stanford University database, we queried TNFα inhibitor prescriptions in 8905 patients with an ICD-9 diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Detailed chart review analysis was done for patients with a concurrent diagnosis of HF who were prescribed anti-TNFα agents. In addition, we collected survey data from 25 gastroenterologists on their usage of these drugs for patients with IBD and HF.TNFα inhibitors were prescribed to 10/455 (2.2%) IBD patients with HF compared to 1265/8450 (15.0%) in IBD patients without HF (p < 0.0001). Of those ten with HF prescribed TNFα inhibitors, only one had it discontinued because of HF exacerbation while on drug. Survey data indicated few (5/25) providers do not actively avoid TNFα inhibitors for those with HF.IBD patients with HF are prescribed significantly less TNFα inhibitors than those without HF. The majority of providers are either uncertain about or actively avoid use of anti-TNFα medications for those with HF. The risks and benefits of anti-TNFα use in HF patients must be investigated further.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-017-4574-2

    View details for PubMedID 28417241

  • Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients with Concurrent Heart Failure. Digestive diseases and sciences Jiang, Y., Lin, O., Sinha, S. R. 2017; 62 (6): 1597-1606

    Abstract

    Prescribing information for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors, a mainstay of treatment for moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), instructs cautious use in those with heart failure (HF). However, the limited data behind these warnings are inconclusive and should be weighed against mounting evidence demonstrating worse cardiac outcomes in active IBD.To assess whether TNFα inhibitor use is reduced in patients with IBD and HF by analyzing physician practice and prescription patterns.Using a Stanford University database, we queried TNFα inhibitor prescriptions in 8905 patients with an ICD-9 diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Detailed chart review analysis was done for patients with a concurrent diagnosis of HF who were prescribed anti-TNFα agents. In addition, we collected survey data from 25 gastroenterologists on their usage of these drugs for patients with IBD and HF.TNFα inhibitors were prescribed to 10/455 (2.2%) IBD patients with HF compared to 1265/8450 (15.0%) in IBD patients without HF (p < 0.0001). Of those ten with HF prescribed TNFα inhibitors, only one had it discontinued because of HF exacerbation while on drug. Survey data indicated few (5/25) providers do not actively avoid TNFα inhibitors for those with HF.IBD patients with HF are prescribed significantly less TNFα inhibitors than those without HF. The majority of providers are either uncertain about or actively avoid use of anti-TNFα medications for those with HF. The risks and benefits of anti-TNFα use in HF patients must be investigated further.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-017-4574-2

    View details for PubMedID 28417241

  • A Thermo-Sensitive Delivery Platform for Topical Administration of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies. Gastroenterology Sinha, S. R., Nguyen, L. P., Inayathullah, M., Malkovskiy, A., Habte, F., Rajadas, J., Habtezion, A. 2015; 149 (1): 52-55 e2

    Abstract

    Systemic therapies for inflammatory bowel disease are associated with increased risk of infections and malignancies. Topical therapies reduce systemic exposure, but can be difficult to retain or have limited proximal distribution. To mitigate these issues, we developed a thermo-sensitive platform, using a polymer-based system that is liquid at room temperature but turns into a viscous gel upon reaching body temperature. Following rectal administration to mice with dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis, the platform carrying budesonide or mesalamine becomes more viscoelastic near body temperature. Mice given the drug-containing platform gained more weight and had reduced histologic and biologic features of colitis than mice given the platform alone or liquid drugs via enema. Image analysis showed that enemas delivered with and without the platform reached similar distances in the colons of mice, but greater colonic retention was achieved by using the platform.

    View details for DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.04.002

    View details for PubMedID 25863215

  • Effect of Intratonsillar Injection of Steroids on the Palatine Tonsils of Rabbits LARYNGOSCOPE Cho, D., Sinha, S. R., Gardner, J. M., Schaller, M. P., Pamnani, R. D., Felt, S. A., Barral, J. K., Messner, A. H. 2014; 124 (12): 2811-2817

    Abstract

    Nasal steroids may significantly improve nasal obstructive symptoms with a reduction of adenoid size in children, but they do not consistently yield the same concurrent effect on enlarged palatine tonsils. Failure of nasal steroids to decrease the size of palatine tonsils is believed to be attributable to location and washout by saliva. The purpose of this study was to determine if direct application of steroid via intratonsillar injection would reduce the size of palatine tonsils in the rabbit model.Prospective animal study.Eight rabbits (16 tonsils) were administered intratonsillar injections of fluticasone (n = 8, 1 mg/ml) or saline (n = 8, 0.1 ml) on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 17. Two rabbits (4 tonsils) received a single steroid injection to compare single versus multiple steroid injections. The rabbit's tonsil size was measured before each injection. After the fifty injections, the tonsils were harvested for histologic analysis.A total of 16 tonsils were analyzed. After five steroid injections, the reduction (-7.7 mm(2)  ± 4.27) in size was statistically significant when compared to reduction (6.12 mm(2)  ± 6.57) in the saline injected group (P = 0.001). Repeated steroid injection was more potent than a single injection (-3.00 mm(2)  ± 3.08) in reducing the size (P = 0.006). In histologic analysis, tonsils after repeated steroid injections were significantly smaller than saline-injected tonsils (P = 0.014), without obvious lymphoid follicles.Repeated focal tonsillar injections of corticosteroids significantly reduced the size of palatine tonsils as compared to saline-injected controls. A single injection of corticosteroids appears to be effective, but not as effective, as multiple injections.N/A.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/lary.24396

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345344200034

  • Effect of intratonsillar injection of steroids on the palatine tonsils of rabbits. Laryngoscope Cho, D., Sinha, S. R., Gardner, J. M., Schaller, M. P., Pamnani, R. D., Felt, S. A., Barral, J. K., Messner, A. H. 2014; 124 (12): 2811-2817

    Abstract

    Nasal steroids may significantly improve nasal obstructive symptoms with a reduction of adenoid size in children, but they do not consistently yield the same concurrent effect on enlarged palatine tonsils. Failure of nasal steroids to decrease the size of palatine tonsils is believed to be attributable to location and washout by saliva. The purpose of this study was to determine if direct application of steroid via intratonsillar injection would reduce the size of palatine tonsils in the rabbit model.Prospective animal study.Eight rabbits (16 tonsils) were administered intratonsillar injections of fluticasone (n = 8, 1 mg/ml) or saline (n = 8, 0.1 ml) on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 17. Two rabbits (4 tonsils) received a single steroid injection to compare single versus multiple steroid injections. The rabbit's tonsil size was measured before each injection. After the fifty injections, the tonsils were harvested for histologic analysis.A total of 16 tonsils were analyzed. After five steroid injections, the reduction (-7.7 mm(2)  ± 4.27) in size was statistically significant when compared to reduction (6.12 mm(2)  ± 6.57) in the saline injected group (P = 0.001). Repeated steroid injection was more potent than a single injection (-3.00 mm(2)  ± 3.08) in reducing the size (P = 0.006). In histologic analysis, tonsils after repeated steroid injections were significantly smaller than saline-injected tonsils (P = 0.014), without obvious lymphoid follicles.Repeated focal tonsillar injections of corticosteroids significantly reduced the size of palatine tonsils as compared to saline-injected controls. A single injection of corticosteroids appears to be effective, but not as effective, as multiple injections.N/A.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/lary.24396

    View details for PubMedID 24114886

  • Strategies for last mile implementation of global health technologies. The Lancet. Global health Chao, T. E., Lo, N. C., Mody, G. N., Sinha, S. R. 2014; 2 (9): e497-8

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70253-0

    View details for PubMedID 25304406

  • Ethnic Disparities in the Association of Body Mass Index with the Risk of Hypertension and Diabetes JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY HEALTH Wong, R. J., Chou, C., Sinha, S. R., Kamal, A., Ahmed, A. 2014; 39 (3): 437-445

    Abstract

    Despite having lower body mass index (BMI) compared to other ethnic groups, Asians continue to develop significant metabolic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. To evaluate the disparate association of BMI and risk of hypertension and diabetes in Asians. We retrospectively studied 150,753 adults from the 1985-2011 California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Trends in prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes were stratified by ethnicity. Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated the incremental effect of one unit BMI increase on risk of hypertension and diabetes and the disparate risks of hypertension and diabetes at different BMI thresholds. Asians had the lowest BMI among all groups. However, the impact of increasing BMI on risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly greater in Asians. For each one unit increase in BMI, Asians were significantly more likely to have hypertension (OR 1.15; 95 % CI 1.13-1.18) compared to non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Similar trends were seen for diabetes (Asians: OR 1.15; 95 % CI 1.13-1.18). The risk of hypertension in Asians with BMI ≥ 22 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 27 and blacks with BMI ≥ 28. The risk of diabetes in Asians with BMI ≥ 28 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 30. Despite lower overall BMI compared to other groups, weight gain in Asians is associated with significantly higher risks of hypertension and diabetes. Compared to other ethnic groups, similar risks of hypertension and diabetes are seen in Asians at much lower BMI.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10900-013-9792-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000335392600005

    View details for PubMedID 24276618

  • Severe Iron Deficiency: Rare Etiology, Easy Treatment DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES Sinha, S. R., Triadafilopoulos, G., Shah, N. 2014; 59 (3): 538-542

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-013-2880-x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000331957400007

    View details for PubMedID 24077943

  • Effect of intra-tonsillar injection of Steroids on the palatine tonsils of rabbits. Laryngoscope Cho, D., Sinha, S. R., et al 2013
  • Severe Iron Deficiency: Rare Etiology, Easy Treatment. Digestive Diseases and Sciences Sinha, S. R., Triadafilopoulos, G., Shah, N. 2013
  • Enhanced imaging technologies in detecting dysplasia in IBD: narrowing or widening our options? Gastroenterology Sinha, S. R., Shah, S. B. 2012; 143 (4): 1108-1110

    View details for DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2012.08.019

    View details for PubMedID 22917863

  • Health Technologies and Innovation in the Global Health Arena NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Sinha, S. R., Barry, M. 2011; 365 (9): 779-782

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294405200002

    View details for PubMedID 21879894

  • Protecting health: thinking small BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION Sinha, S. R., Batniji, R. 2010; 88 (9): 713-715

    View details for DOI 10.2471/BLT.09.071530

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282673900016

    View details for PubMedID 20865078

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2930363

  • Shaping National Health Financing Systems: How Can Micro-banking Contribute? World Health Organization Technical Brief Durairaj V, Sinha SR, et al. 2009