Bio


Dr. Tina Seelig is Professor of the Practice in the Department of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) at Stanford University. She is also a faculty director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), the entrepreneurship center at Stanford University's School of Engineering. She teaches courses on creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship in MS&E and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) at Stanford.

In 2014 Dr. Seelig was honored with the SVForum Visionary Award, and in 2009 she received the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering, recognizing her as a national leader in engineering education. She received the 2014 MS&E Award for Graduate Teaching, the 2008 National Olympus Innovation Award, and the 2005 Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Dr. Seelig earned a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Stanford University School of Medical where she studied neuroplasticity. She has worked as a management consultant for Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, as a multimedia producer at Compaq Computer Corporation, and was the founder of a multimedia company called BookBrowser.

She has written 17 books and educational games. Her books include The Epicurean Laboratory and Incredible Edible Science, which focus on the chemistry of cooking, published by Scientific American; and a dozen games for children, called "Games for Your Brain," published by Chronicle Books. Her newest books, published by HarperCollins, explore the process of bringing ideas to fruition. They include What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 (2009), inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity (2012), and Insight Out: Get Ideas Out of Your Head and Into the World (2015) .

Academic Appointments


  • Professor of the Practice, Management Science and Engineering

Honors & Awards


  • Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, Stanford School of Engineering (2005)
  • National Olympus Innovation Award, Olympus and NCIIA (2008)
  • Gordon Prize, National Academy of Engineering (2009)
  • Management Science and Engineering Graduate Teaching Award, Stanford School of Engineering (2014)
  • SVForum Visionary Award, SVForum (2014)

2016-17 Courses


All Publications


  • Insight Out: Get Ideas Out of Your Head and Into the World Seelig, T. L. HarperCollins. 2015
  • inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity (Harper Collins) Seelig, T. 2012
  • What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 (Harper Collins) Seelig, T. 2006
  • BETA-2-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS ON PERIPHERAL-NERVES JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY Schreurs, J., Seelig, T., Schulman, H. 1986; 46 (1): 294-296

    Abstract

    We report that peripheral nerves have a functional adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptor. The pharmacological specificity of this receptor is shown to be of the beta 2 subtype. Two peripheral nerves, the sciatic from the frog and rat and the vagus from the rat, responded to beta 2-agonists with 10-50-fold increases in intracellular cyclic AMP level. This increase was inhibited by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. In contrast, a central nerve tract, the corpus callosum, responded to isoproterenol with only a minimal one- to twofold increase in cyclic AMP level. These studies demonstrate that peripheral nerves have beta 2-adrenergic receptors that are responsive to exogenously applied catecholamines and suggest a role for these ligands in the previously described modulation of axonal conduction.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986AVX0700044

    View details for PubMedID 2999336

  • CYCLIC-AMP REDUCTION OF FREQUENCY FOLLOWING ABILITY IN PERIPHERAL AXONS BRAIN RESEARCH SEELIG, T. L., Grossman, Y., Kendig, J. J. 1983; 279 (1-2): 303-307

    Abstract

    Radioimmunoassays for cAMP demonstrated that a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, increased cAMP levels in isolated frog sciatic nerve. Dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP) and isoproterenol reduced the amplitude of the compound action potential and decreased the ability of the Xenopus sciatic nerve to follow high frequency stimulation. Similar effects of db-cAMP and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor were seen on intracellularly recorded action potentials of single lobster peripheral axons. These results suggest that cAMP can modulate the electrophysiological response properties of both myelinated and unmyelinated axons.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RS76500042

    View details for PubMedID 6196092

  • CYCLIC-NUCLEOTIDE MODULATION OF NA+ AND K+ CURRENTS IN THE ISOLATED NODE OF RANVIER BRAIN RESEARCH SEELIG, T. L., Kendig, J. J. 1982; 245 (1): 144-147

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982PA88000016

    View details for PubMedID 6288192