Bio


Tomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Professor, Stanford University, Department of Sociology (2014 - Present)
  • Assistant Professor, Stanford University, Department of Sociology (2008 - 2014)
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of California, San Diego (2005 - 2008)
  • Fellow, New America Foundation (2007 - 2009)

Honors & Awards


  • Fellow, Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (2013-2014)
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, Stanford, CA (2012-2013)
  • Summer Fellow, Russell Sage Foundation, New York, NY (2012)
  • Distinguished Book Award, American Sociological Association’s Section on Latino/Latina Sociology (2010)
  • Distinguished Contribution to Research - Best Article Award, American Sociological Association’s Sociology Section on Latino/Latina Sociology (2010)
  • Visiting Research Fellowship, U. of California, San Diego Ctr for Comparative Immigration Studies and Ctr for U.S.-Mexico Studies (2007-2008)
  • Professor of the Year, Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of California, San Diego (2006-2007)
  • Fellowship, American Sociological Association Congressional Fellowship (2005)
  • Excellence in Teaching Certificate, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University (2004)
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship for language study in México, United States Department of Education (2001)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Faculty Affiliate, Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University (2008 - Present)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Center for Latin American Studies, Stanford University (2008 - Present)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, San Diego (2005 - 2008)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Center for Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of California, San Diego (2005 - 2008)
  • Graduate Student Associate, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University (2002 - 2003)
  • Graduate Student Associate, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, Harvard University Kennedy School of Government (1999 - 2005)
  • Reviewer, American Sociological Review
  • Reviewer, American Journal of Sociology
  • Reviewer, Social Forces
  • Reviewer, American Journal of Political Science
  • Reviewer, Stanford University Press
  • Reviewer, Yale University Press
  • Reviewer, Oxford University Press
  • Reviewer, Social Problems
  • Reviewer, Ethnic and Racial Studies
  • Reviewer, Social Science Quarterly
  • Reviewer, Social Science Research
  • Reviewer, Political Research Quarterly
  • Reviewer, Du Bois Review
  • Reviewer, Sociological Quarterly
  • Reviewer, Sociological Perspectives
  • Reviewer, Poetics
  • Reviwer, Qualitative Sociology
  • Reviewer, Sociological Theory
  • Reviewer, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography
  • Reviewer, Prentice Hall
  • Reviewer, Law and Social Inquiry
  • Reviewer, National Science Foundation
  • Reviewer, Russell Sage Foundation
  • Reviewer, Urban Studies
  • Member, Minority Affairs Advisory Panel of the American Sociological Association (2011 - Present)
  • Advisory Council Member, America Abroad Media’s special radio series, “Integration and Identity in the West” (2011 - Present)
  • Member of the Cultural Contact and Immigration Working Group, Russell Sage Foundation, New York, NY
  • Council Member, International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association (2009 - 2012)
  • Member, Steering Committee, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, San Diego (2005 - 2008)
  • Trustee, Santa Clara University (2000 - 2006)
  • Resident Tutor, Lowell House, Harvard University (2000 - 2004)
  • Graduate Student Representative on Graduate Admissions Committee, Department of Sociology, Harvard University (2000 - 2001)
  • Graduate Student Representative to Committee on Higher Degree, Department of Sociology, Harvard University (1999 - 2000)
  • Member, Selection Committee, ACLS Senior Fellowships (2004 - 2006)

Program Affiliations


  • Center for Latin American Studies

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Harvard University, Sociology (2005)
  • A.M., Harvard University, Sociology (2001)
  • B.S, Santa Clara University, Sociology (1998)

2017-18 Courses


All Publications


  • Intergenerational Mobility of the Mexican-Origin Population in California and Texas Relative to a Changing Regional Mainstream INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW Park, J., Myers, D., Jimenez, T. R. 2014; 48 (2): 442-481

    View details for DOI 10.1111/imre.12086

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337524700006

  • Mexican Americans as a paradigm for contemporary intra-group heterogeneity ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES Alba, R., Jimenez, T. R., Marrow, H. B. 2014; 37 (3): 446-466
  • Why Replenishment Strengthens Racial Boundaries Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective Jiménez, T. R. edited by Grusky, D. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. 2014
  • When White Is Just Alright: How Immigrants Redefine Achievement and Reconfigure the Ethnoracial Hierarchy AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Jimenez, T. R., Horowitz, A. L. 2013; 78 (5): 849-871
  • Les Américains d’origine mexicaine et la dynamique de la diversité interne Informations sociales Jiménez, T. R. 2013; 177: 96-104
  • Immigration and the Intersection of Ethnic and National Narratives: The Case of Ethnic Mexicans in the United States Narrating Peoplehood Amidst Diversity Jimenez, T. edited by Bøss, M. Denmark: Aarhus University Press. 2011: 207–229
  • Policy of Perversity: How Social Policy Is Distorting Trends in Unauthorized Immigration Pathways Jiménez, T. R., López-Sanders, L. 2011: 3-7
  • Affiliative ethnic identity: a more elastic link between ethnic ancestry and culture ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES Jimenez, T. R. 2010; 33 (10): 1756-1775
  • Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity Jiménez, T. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 2010
  • Contexts for bilingualism among US-born Latinos ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES Linton, A., Jimenez, T. R. 2009; 32 (6): 967-995
  • From Newcomers to Americans: An Integration Policy for a Nation of Immigrants Mandate for Change: Policies and Leadership for 2009 and Beyond Jiménez, T. R. edited by Hartmam, C. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. 2009: 257–266
  • Mexican immigrant replenishment and the continuing significance of ethnicity and race AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Jimenez, T. R. 2008; 113 (6): 1527-1567

    Abstract

    The literature on assimilation and ethnic identity formation largely assumes that the durability of ethnic boundaries is a function of the assimilation measures that sociologists commonly employ. But this literature fails to account adequately for the role of immigration patterns in explaining the durability and nature of ethnic boundaries. Using 123 in-depth interviews with later-generation Mexican Americans, this article shows that Mexican immigrant replenishment shapes ethnic boundaries and ethnic identity formation. The sizable immigrant population sharpens intergroup boundaries through the indirect effects of nativism and by contributing to the continuing significance of race in the lives of later-generation Mexican Americans. The presence of a large immigrant population also creates intragroup boundaries that run through the Mexican-origin population and that are animated by expectations about ethnic authenticity. The article illustrates the importance of immigrant replenishment to processes of assimilation and ethnic identity formation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257894000002

    View details for PubMedID 19044142

  • What Different Generations of Mexican Americans Think About Immigration from Mexico GENERATIONS-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY ON AGING Jimenez, T. R. 2008; 32 (4): 93-96
  • Assessing Immigrant Assimilation: New Empirical and Theoretical Challenges The Contemporary Debate in the Field of International Migration in the U.S. Waters`, M. C., Jiménez, T. R. edited by Gonzalez, M. F. Buenos Aires: Prometo Press. 2008
  • Weighing the costs and benefits of Mexican immigration: The Mexican-American perspective SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY Jimenez, T. R. 2007; 88 (3): 599-618
  • Mexican Assimilation: A Temporal and Spatial Reorientation Du Bois Review Jiménez, T. R., Fitzgerald, D. 2007; 4 (2): 337-354
  • From Newcomers to Americans: An Integration Policy for a Nation of Immigrants, Immigration Policy In Focus Jiménez, T. R. 2007; 5 (11)
  • American Immigration Policy: Toward Integration Footnotes: The Newsletter of the American Sociological Association Jiménez, . R. 2005; 33 (7)
  • On Being the Minority Footnotes: The Newsletter of the American Sociological Association Jiménez, T. R. 2005; 33 (5)
  • Immigration Reform and the Latino Vote Footnotes: The Newsletter of the American Sociological Association Jiménez, T. R. 2005; 33 (8)
  • Assessing immigrant assimilation: New empirical and theoretical challenge ANNUAL REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY Waters, M. C., Jimenez, T. R. 2005; 31: 105-125
  • Negotiating Ethnic Boundaries: Multiethnic Mexican Americans and Ethnic Identity in the United States Ethnicities Jiménez, T. R. 2004; 4 (1): 75-97
  • Negotiating Ethnic Boundaries: Multiethnic Mexican Americans and Ethnic Identity in the United States Crossing Lines: Race and Mixed Race Across the Geohistorical Divide, Jiménez, T. R. edited by Coronado, M., Guevarra, R. P., Morriz, J., Szanto, L. F. Lanham, MD: Alta Mira Press. 2003: 161–188
  • Ethnic Inter-marriage The Encyclopedia of American Immigration Jiménez, T. edited by Ciment, J., Ness, I. New York: M.E. Sharpe, Inc. 2001: 435–439
  • Latina Women’s Studies Encyclopedia García, A. M., Tomás, J. edited by Tierney, H. New York: Greenwood Press. 1998