Professional Education


  • Master of Science, University of Cambridge (2012)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge (2016)
  • Bachelor of Science, University College London (2010)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Proteomic analysis of young and old mouse hematopoietic stem cells and their progenitors reveals post-transcriptional regulation in stem cells. eLife Zaro, B. W., Noh, J. J., Mascetti, V. L., Demeter, J., George, B., Zukowska, M., Gulati, G. S., Sinha, R., Flynn, R. A., Banuelos, A., Zhang, A., Wilkinson, A. C., Jackson, P., Weissman, I. L. 2020; 9

    Abstract

    The balance of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation is critical for a healthy blood supply; imbalances underlie hematological diseases. The importance of HSCs and their progenitors have led to their extensive characterization at genomic and transcriptomic levels. However, the proteomics of hematopoiesis remains incompletely understood. Here we report a proteomics resource from mass spectrometry of mouse young adult and old adult mouse HSCs, multipotent progenitors and oligopotent progenitors; 12 cell types in total. We validated differential protein levels, including confirmation that Dnmt3a protein levels are undetected in young adult mouse HSCs until forced into cycle. Additionally, through integrating proteomics and RNA-sequencing datasets, we identified a subset of genes with apparent post-transcriptional repression in young adult mouse HSCs. In summary, we report proteomic coverage of young and old mouse HSCs and progenitors, with broader implications for understanding mechanisms for stem cell maintenance, niche interactions and fate determination.

    View details for DOI 10.7554/eLife.62210

    View details for PubMedID 33236985

  • Honey bee Royalactin unlocks conserved pluripotency pathway in mammals. Nature communications Wan, D. C., Morgan, S. L., Spencley, A. L., Mariano, N., Chang, E. Y., Shankar, G., Luo, Y., Li, T. H., Huh, D., Huynh, S. K., Garcia, J. M., Dovey, C. M., Lumb, J., Liu, L., Brown, K. V., Bermudez, A., Luong, R., Zeng, H., Mascetti, V. L., Pitteri, S. J., Wang, J., Tu, H., Quarta, M., Sebastiano, V., Nusse, R., Rando, T. A., Carette, J. E., Bazan, J. F., Wang, K. C. 2018; 9 (1): 5078

    Abstract

    Royal jelly is the queen-maker for the honey bee Apis mellifera, and has cross-species effects on longevity, fertility, and regeneration in mammals. Despite this knowledge, how royal jelly or its components exert their myriad effects has remained poorly understood. Using mouse embryonic stem cells as a platform, here we report that through its major protein component Royalactin, royal jelly can maintain pluripotency by activating a ground-state pluripotency-like gene network. We further identify Regina, a mammalian structural analog of Royalactin that also induces a naive-like state in mouse embryonic stem cells. This reveals an important innate program for stem cell self-renewal with broad implications in understanding the molecular regulation of stem cell fate across species.

    View details for PubMedID 30510260