Bio


I started working in wildlife conservation and veterinary science over 10 years ago as a volunteer working in marine mammal rehabilitation. My current work focuses on marine mammal research, conservation, and applications within the one health and conservation medicine framework.

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Conservation Committee, IAAAM (2020 - Present)
  • Student Member, IAAAM (2013 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, University of California Santa Cruz (2015)
  • Master of Science, Tufts University (2017)
  • Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University (2020)

Stanford Advisors


Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • Surgical repair and subsequent stent placement following traumatic trans-rectal urethral transection in a dog VETERINARY RECORD CASE REPORTS Davila, C., Rozanski, E., Butty, E., Krucik, D. R., Kudej, R. K. 2021; 9 (1)

    View details for DOI 10.1002/vrc2.47

    View details for Web of Science ID 000626136200001

  • SERUM BIOCHEMICAL AND HEMATOLOGIC REFERENCE INTERVALS FOR WEANLING NORTHWEST ATLANTIC GRAY SEALS (HALICHOERUS GRYPUS) JOURNAL OF ZOO AND WILDLIFE MEDICINE Krucik, D. R., Mangold, B., Puryear, W., Keogh, M., Bogomolni, A., Romano, T., Runstadler, J., Nutter, F. 2020; 51 (1): 228-231

    Abstract

    Baseline health parameters are limited in the primary literature for gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the northwest Atlantic. Accurate normal physiologic reference ranges for both species and specific geographic populations are vital tools for assessing the health of individuals and understanding the health of the entire population. This study developed comprehensive reference intervals for biochemical and hematologic parameters of recently weaned gray seal pups on Cape Cod, Massachusetts from samples collected in 2013, 2016, and 2017. Reference ranges were developed using methodology outlined by the American Society of Clinical Veterinary Pathology. By establishing more comprehensive biochemical and hematologic reference ranges for this population based on a robust sample size, this study provides a new tool for clinicians, researchers, and rehabilitation organizations to improve individual patient care and population research.

    View details for DOI 10.1638/2019-0086

    View details for Web of Science ID 000521943300028

    View details for PubMedID 32212568

  • ASSOCIATION BETWEEN POSITIVE CANINE HEARTWORM (DIROFILARIA IMMITIS) ANTIGEN RESULTS AND PRESENCE OF ACANTHOCHEILONEMA ODENDHALI MICROFILARIA IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS) JOURNAL OF ZOO AND WILDLIFE MEDICINE Krucik, D. R., Van Bonn, W., Johnson, S. P. 2016; 47 (1): 25-28

    Abstract

    This study establishes a relationship between positive canine heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) test results frequently observed in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and infection with the filarid nematode Acanthocheilonema odendhali. Four commercially available canine heartworm antigen tests were evaluated for cross-reaction with A. odendhali in California sea lions. Sera were tested from fifteen California sea lions with A. odendhali-associated microfilaremia, confirmed by blood smear, and with no evidence of D. immitis infection at necropsy. Ninety-five percent of tests were falsely positive for D. immitis. This study also determined that the prevalence of A. odendhali infection in stranded California sea lions from central California is approximately 23% by comparing the number of findings of mircofilaremia to the total number of California sea lions sampled at The Marine Mammal Center between 2005 and 2011, inclusive. Acanthocheilonema odenhali microfilaremia in California sea lions is likely to cross-react with canine heartworm antigen tests, and clinicians should interpret results with caution.

    View details for DOI 10.1638/2014-0116.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000373211000005

    View details for PubMedID 27010261