Bio


Dr. Padilla's research follows three major strands: (1) resilient students who achieve high levels of academic performance despite coming from home and community backgrounds that pose multiple challenges to educational excellence, including adaptation to U.S. culture and English by immigrant adolescents; (2) acculturation and acculturation stressors that impact the physical and psychological well-being of newcomer youth and adults as well as the acquisition of bicultural strategies for functioning in their home culture and in mainstream American culture; and (3) studies involving second language learning and teaching, and strategies for achieving bilingual proficiency especially among heritage speakers of numerous European and Asian languages. He has published widely in his areas of research expertise.

Dr. Padilla is also interested in quantitative research in multicultural contexts. He serves as the principal investigator of the California World Language Project (CWLP), a program that assists California teachers in world language instruction. A final interest includes the history of ethnic minority scholars in psychology.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Professor of Developmental and Psychological Sciences in Education, Stanford Graduate School of Education (1988 - Present)
  • Faculty Advisor, Stanford World Languages Project (2018 - Present)
  • Faculty Advisor, California World Languages Project (2018 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Assistant Professor of Psychology, State University of New York (1969 - 1971)
  • Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara (1971 - 1974)
  • Associate Professor to Full Professor of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles (1974 - 1988)
  • Editor, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences (1979 - Present)
  • Former Member, Board of Directors, EdSource (2005 - 2010)
  • Member, Board of Directors, DreamCatchers (2008 - Present)

Professional Education


  • B.A., New Mexico Highlands University, Psychology
  • M.S., Oklahoma State University, Experimental Psychology
  • Ph.D., University of New Mexico, Experimental Psychology

Research Interests


  • Achievement
  • Adolesence
  • Child Development
  • Diversity and Identity
  • Immigrants and Immigration
  • Parents and family issues
  • Poverty and Inequality
  • Psychology
  • Race and Ethnicity

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Current projects include: (a) the development of models of ethnic identity that incorporate social cognition theory and social identity; (b)acculturation stress and mental health status across three generations of Latinos; (c) home, school and community protective factors that empower Latino students to succeed academically; (d) learning of Mandarin by high school students in summer intensive programs vs. students in regular high school world language classes; and (e) student language and academic content learning in a Mandarin/English dual language immersion program.

Projects


  • California Foreign Language Project

    Principal Investigator, California Foreign Language Project

    Location

    United States

2019-20 Courses


Stanford Advisees


All Publications


  • Role of Bilingualism and Biculturalism as Assets in Positive Psychology: Conceptual Dynamic GEAR Model FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY Chen, X., Padilla, A. M. 2019; 10
  • The Flowering of Positive Psychology in Foreign Language Teaching and Acquisition Research. Frontiers in psychology Dewaele, J., Chen, X., Padilla, A. M., Lake, J. 2019; 10: 2128

    Abstract

    The present contribution offers an overview of a new area of research in the field of foreign language acquisition, which was triggered by the introduction of Positive Psychology (PP) (MacIntyre and Gregersen, 2012). For many years, a cognitive perspective had dominated research in applied linguistics. Around the turn of the millennium researchers became increasingly interested in the role of emotions in foreign language learning and teaching, beyond established concepts like foreign language anxiety and constructs like motivation and attitudes toward the foreign language. As a result, a more nuanced understanding of the role of positive and negative learner and teacher emotions emerged, underpinned by solid empirical research using a wide range of epistemological and methodological approaches. PP interventions have been carried out in schools and universities to strengthen learners and teachers' experiences of flow, hope, courage, well-being, optimism, creativity, happiness, grit, resilience, strengths, and laughter with the aim of enhancing learners' linguistic progress. This paper distinguishes the early period in the field that started with MacIntyre and Gregersen (2012), like a snowdrop after winter, and that was followed by a number of early studies in relatively peripheral journals. We argue that 2016 is the starting point of the current period, characterized by gradual recognition in applied linguistics, growing popularity of PP, and an exponential increase in publications in more mainstream journals. This second period could be compared to a luxuriant English garden in full bloom.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02128

    View details for PubMedID 31607981

  • Latino MillennialsThe New Diverse Workforce: Challenges and Opportunities HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Blancero, D., Mourino-Ruiz, E., Padilla, A. M. 2018; 40 (1): 3–21
  • THE ROLE OF SCHOOL AND TEACHERS IN ENGLISH LEARNERS' SOCIOEMOTIONAL WELL-BEING STRESS AND COPING OF ENGLISH LEARNERS Rodriguez, V., Hussain, S., Padilla, A., Rishel, T., Miller, P. C. 2018: 39–59
  • The Hispanic Stress Inventory Version 2: Improving the assessment of acculturation stress. Psychological assessment Cervantes, R. C., Fisher, D. G., Padilla, A. M., Napper, L. E. 2016; 28 (5): 509-522

    Abstract

    This article reports on a 2-phase study to revise the Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI; Cervantes, Padilla, & Salgado de Snyder, 1991). The necessity for a revised stress-assessment instrument was determined by demographic and political shifts affecting Latin American immigrants and later-generation Hispanics in the United States in the 2 decades since the development of the HSI. The data for the revision of the HSI (termed the HSI2) was collected at 4 sites: Los Angeles, El Paso, Miami, and Boston, and included 941 immigrants and 575 U.S.-born Hispanics and a diverse population of Hispanic subgroups. The immigrant version of the HSI2 includes 10 stress subscales, whereas the U.S.-born version includes 6 stress subscales. Both versions of the HSI2 are shown to possess satisfactory Cronbach's alpha reliabilities and demonstrate expert-based content validity, as well as concurrent validity when correlated with subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (Kroenke, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001). The new HSI2 instruments are recommended for use by clinicians and researchers interested in assessing psychosocial stress among diverse Hispanic populations of various ethnic subgroups, age groups, and geographic location. (PsycINFO Database Record

    View details for DOI 10.1037/pas0000200

    View details for PubMedID 26348029

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4781681

  • Predicting South Korean university students’ happiness through social support and efficacy beliefs International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling Lee, D. S., Padilla, A. M. 2016; 38 (1): 48-60
  • Learner Performance in Mandarin Immersion and High School World Language Programs: A Comparison FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Xu, X., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D. M. 2015; 48 (1): 26-38

    View details for DOI 10.1111/flan.12123

    View details for Web of Science ID 000352157100004

  • Acculturative Stress and Coping: Gender Differences Among Korean and Korean American University Students JOURNAL OF COLLEGE STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Lee, D. S., Padilla, A. M. 2014; 55 (3): 243-262
  • The time factor in Mandarin language learning: the four-week intensive versus the regular high school semester The Language Learning Journal Xu, X., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D. 2014; 42 (1): 55-66
  • A Mandarin/English Two-Way Immersion Program: Language Proficiency and Academic Achievement FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Padilla, A. M., Fan, L., Xu, X., Silva, D. 2013; 46 (4): 661-679

    View details for DOI 10.1111/flan.12060

    View details for Web of Science ID 000328606700010

  • Acculturation-Related Stress and Mental Health Outcomes Among Three Generations of Hispanic Adolescents HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Cervantes, R. C., Padilla, A. M., Napper, L. E., Goldbach, J. T. 2013; 35 (4): 451-468
  • Using Meaningful Interpretation and Chunking to Enhance Memory: The Case of Chinese Character Learning FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Xu, X., Padilla, A. M. 2013; 46 (3): 402-422

    View details for DOI 10.1111/flan.12039

    View details for Web of Science ID 000324997500007

  • Developing a culture of resilience for low-income immigrant youth The Urban Review Borrero, N., Lee, D. S., Padilla, A. M. 2013; 45 (2): 99-116
  • A High School Intensive Summer Mandarin Course: Program Model and Learner Outcomes FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Xu, X., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D., Masuda, N. 2012; 45 (4): 622-638

    View details for DOI 10.1111/flan.12005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000314468800010

  • Using Qualitative Methods for Revising Items in the Hispanic Stress Inventory HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Cervantes, R. C., Goldbach, J. T., Padilla, A. M. 2012; 34 (2): 208-231
  • My life in fast forward: Reflections on the making of a Latino psychologist. Handbook of multicultural counseling Padilla, A. M. 2010
  • Professional Development for Teachers of Mandarin: Creating Career Pathways for New Teachers Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association Xu, X., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D. M., Steele, T. M., Peterson, M. D. 2010; 45: 3
  • Synopsis of Key Persons, Events, and Associations in the History of Latino Psychology CULTURAL DIVERSITY & ETHNIC MINORITY PSYCHOLOGY Padilla, A. M., Olmedo, E. 2009; 15 (4): 363-373

    Abstract

    In this article, we present a brief synopsis of six early Latino psychologists, several key conferences, the establishment of research centers, and early efforts to create an association for Latino psychologists. Our chronology runs from approximately 1930 to 2000. This history is a firsthand account of how these early leaders, conferences, and efforts to bring Latinos and Latinas together served as a backdrop to current research and practice in Latino psychology. This history of individuals and events is also intertwined with the American Psychological Association and the National Institute of Mental Health and efforts by Latino psychologists to obtain the professional support necessary to lay down the roots of a Latino presence in psychology.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0017557

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271819500005

    View details for PubMedID 19916671

  • A Year-Round Professional Development Model for World Language Educators FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Steele, T. M., Peterson, M. D., Silva, D. M., Padilla, A. M. 2009; 42 (2): 195-211
  • Developmental processes related to intergenerational transmission of culture: Growing up with two cultures Cultural transmission: Psychological, developmental, social, and methodological aspects Padilla, A. M. 2009: 185-211
  • Bicultural social development HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Padilla, A. M. 2006; 28 (4): 467-497
  • Foreign language education, academic performance, and socioeconomic status: A study of California schools FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Sung, H., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D. A. 2006; 39 (1): 115-130
  • Second language learning: Issues in research and teaching Handbook of educational psychology Padilla, A. 2006: 571-591
  • Bicultural social development Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences Padilla, A. M. 2006; 28 (4): 467-497
  • A statewide professional development program for California foreign language teachers FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Lozano, A. S., Padilla, A. M., Sung, H., Silva, D. M. 2004; 37 (2): 301-309
  • Entering and succeeding in the "culture of college": The story of two Mexican heritage students HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Cabrera, N. L., Padilla, A. M. 2004; 26 (2): 152-170
  • The origins of the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences: A personal memoir HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Padilla, A. M. 2003; 25 (1): 3-12
  • Acculturation, social identity, and social cognition: A new perspective HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Padilla, A. M., Perez, W. 2003; 25 (1): 35-55
  • Acculturation, social identity, and social cognition: A new perspective Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences Padilla, A. M., Perez, W. 2003; 25 (1): 35-55
  • Evaluation of professional development for language teachers in California FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Lozano, A. S., Sung, H., Padilla, A. M., Silva, D. M. 2002; 35 (2): 161-170
  • Rewarding workplace bilingualism Language Magazine Padilla, A. 2002; 2: 21-23
  • Cultural orientation across three generations of Hispanic adolescents HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Perez, W., Padilla, A. M. 2000; 22 (3): 390-398
  • Celebrating the future of Chicano psychology: Lessons from the recent national conference HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Velasquez, R. J., Arellano, L. M., Padilla, A. M. 1999; 21 (1): 3-13
  • Student motivation, parental attitudes, and involvement in the learning of Asian languages in elementary and secondary schools MODERN LANGUAGE JOURNAL Sung, H. K., Padilla, A. M. 1998; 82 (2): 205-216
  • The academic resilience of Mexican American high school students HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES GONZALEZ, R., Padilla, A. M. 1997; 19 (3): 301-317
  • Academic invulnerability among a select group of Latino university students HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Arellano, A. R., Padilla, A. M. 1996; 18 (4): 485-507
  • Development and implementation of student portfolios in foreign language programs FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS Padilla, A. M., Aninao, J. C., Sung, H. 1996; 29 (3): 429-438
  • PLACE OF LAST DRINK BY REPEAT DUI OFFENDERS - A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF GENDER AND ETHNIC-GROUP DIFFERENCES HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Padilla, A. M., Morrissey, L. 1993; 15 (3): 357-372
  • MEXICAN-AMERICAN ADOLESCENT SEXUALITY AND SEXUAL KNOWLEDGE - AN EXPLORATORY-STUDY HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Padilla, A. M., Baird, T. L. 1991; 13 (1): 95-104

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991EV41000007

    View details for PubMedID 12284263

  • THE ENGLISH-ONLY MOVEMENT - MYTHS, REALITY, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PSYCHOLOGY AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST Padilla, A. M., LINDHOLM, K. J., Chen, A., Duran, R., Hakuta, K., Lambert, W., Tucker, G. R. 1991; 46 (2): 120-130
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL AND COGNITIVE CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL-USE IN YOUNGER ADULT IMMIGRANT AND UNITED-STATES-BORN HISPANICS INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THE ADDICTIONS Cervantes, R. C., Gilbert, M. J., DESNYDER, N. S., Padilla, A. M. 1991; 25 (5A-6A): 687-708
  • GENDER AND ETHNIC-DIFFERENCES IN PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS AND GENERALIZED DISTRESS AMONG HISPANICS SEX ROLES DESNYDER, V. N., Cervantes, R. C., Padilla, A. M. 1990; 22 (7-8): 441-453
  • RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE HISPANIC STRESS INVENTORY HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Cervantes, R. C., Padilla, A. M., DESNYDER, N. S. 1990; 12 (1): 76-82
  • COUNTERTRANSFERENCE IN WORKING WITH VICTIMS OF POLITICAL REPRESSION AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY COMASDIAZ, L., Padilla, A. M. 1990; 60 (1): 125-134

    Abstract

    The countertransferential reactions of psychotherapists working in a threatening environment with victims of political repression are described. Via case studies based on clinical consultation and direct testimony, this paper examines the effects on Chilean therapists living and working in that country. It is suggested that these clinical observations may have application to therapeutic work with victims in other stressful settings.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CK72600013

    View details for PubMedID 2305840

  • POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS IN IMMIGRANTS FROM CENTRAL-AMERICA AND MEXICO HOSPITAL AND COMMUNITY PSYCHIATRY Cervantes, R. C., DESNYDER, V. N., Padilla, A. M. 1989; 40 (6): 615-619

    Abstract

    International migration has been associated with increased levels of psychological disturbance, particularly among refugees who have fled from war or political unrest. This study examined self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, somatization, generalized distress, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a community sample of 258 immigrants from Central America and Mexico and 329 native-born Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans. Immigrants were found to have higher levels of generalized distress than native-born Americans. Fifty-two percent of Central American immigrants who migrated as a result of war or political unrest reported symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of PTSD, compared with 49 percent of Central Americans who migrated for other reasons and 25 percent of Mexican immigrants. The authors call for more research to document the psychosocial aspects of migration.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989U830500011

    View details for PubMedID 2737629

  • RESEARCH THEMES, AUTHORS, AND FUTURE-DIRECTIONS IN THE HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL-SCIENCES HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BAEZCONDEGARBANATI, L., Padilla, A. M. 1988; 10 (4): 325-337