Graduate School of Business


Showing 91-100 of 104 Results

  • Robert Eric Siegel

    Robert Eric Siegel

    Lecturer, Graduate School of Business

    BioRobert Siegel is a Lecturer in Management where he has led primary research and written cases on Google, Box, AngelList, SurveyMonkey, Medium, Wikimedia Foundation, Zuora, Minted, 500 Startups, TrueCar, PayPal, Axel Springer, General Electric and Starbucks (La Boulange) amongst others.

    He is also a General Partner at XSeed Capital, and his investment areas include enterprise software, business operations where computational technology helps automate/improve company performance, and computing platforms that shape both business and consumer behaviors.

    He sits on the Board of Directors of Zooz and Cape Productions. Robert led XSeed’s investments in Lex Machina (acquired by LexisNexis of the RELX Group – NYSE: RELX), CirroSecure (acquired by Palo Alto Networks – NYSE: PANW), Chatous, Dispatcher, Breezeworks, The League, Teapot, Smart Coffee Technology, Neon, Pixlee, Caller Zen, ZipLine Medical and SIPX (acquired by ProQuest), and also supports portfolio companies such as Citrine Informatics.

    Robert is the Co-President of Stanford Angels & Entrepreneurs, an alumni association that fosters relationships to strengthen the Stanford startup community. He is on the Board of SmartDrive Systems and is the Chairman of the Strategic Advisory Board for TTTech in Vienna, Austria. Robert has co-authored several articles for California Management Review, is a Wall Street Journal Startup Guru, and is a frequent contributor to TechCrunch, Forbes and VentureBeat.

    Prior to joining XSeed, Robert was General Manager of the Video and Software Solutions division for GE Security, with annual revenues of $350 million. Robert was also Executive Vice President of Pixim, Inc., a fabless semiconductor firm specializing in image sensors and processors (acquired by Sony). Before Pixim, Robert was Co-Founder & Chief Executive Officer of Weave Innovations Inc. (acquired by Kodak), a network services developer that invented the world’s first digital picture frame, and delivered photos and other digital media to PCs and internet / mobile devices.

    Robert served in various management roles at Intel Corporation, including an executive position in their Corporate Business Development division, in which he invested capital in startups that were strategically aligned with Intel’s vision. Previous to Intel, Robert was promoted to a series of senior sales and marketing positions at GeoWorks, which went public in 1993.

    Robert holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MBA from Stanford University, is the co-inventor of four patents and served as lead researcher for Andy Grove’s book, Only the Paranoid Survive.

  • Sarah Soule

    Sarah Soule

    Morgridge Professor in the Graduate School of Business, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology

    BioSarah A. Soule is the Morgridge Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business. Her major areas of interest are organizational theory, social movements, and political sociology. She has written two recent books, the first with Cambridge University Press, entitled Contention and Corporate Social Responsibility, and the second with Norton, called A Primer on Social Movements. She is the series editor for the Cambridge University Press Contentious Politics series. She is a member of the founding team of the new journal, Sociological Science, an open access journal that is disrupting academic publishing. She has served on a number of boards of non-profit organizations, is currently a member Board of Advisors to the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (the Stanford d.school) Fellowship program, and is currently serving on the faculty advisory board to the Stanford Center for the Advancement of Women’s Leadership. She has taught a number of courses with the Stanford d.school, and is the Faculty Director for the Executive Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Graduate School of Business. She has served as a judge for the Center for Social Innovation Fellowship program, and for the Tech Awards (Tech Museum of Innovation). Her research examines state and organizational-level policy change and diffusion, and the role social movements have on these processes. She has recently published papers on how protest impacts multi-national firm-level decisions regarding divestment in Burma, and on how advocacy organizations learn new strategies and tactics from those with which they collaborate. She is currently working on a study of how protest affects the outcomes of shareholder resolutions, and another study of how advocacy organizations innovate. She has published a book with Cambridge University Press, entitled Contention and Corporate Social Responsibility. Recent published work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, Administrative Science Quarterly, the American Sociological Review, Organizational Studies, the Strategic Management Journal, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

  • Robert Sutton

    Robert Sutton

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    BioRobert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and a Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford. Sutton has been teaching classes on the psychology of business and management at Stanford since 1983. He is co-founder of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization, which he co-directed from 1996 to 2006. He is also co-founder of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). Sutton and Stanford Business School's Huggy Rao recently launched the Designing Organizational Change Project, which is hosted by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program

    Sutton studies innovation, leadership, the links between managerial knowledge and organization action, scaling excellence, and workplace dynamics. He has published over 100 articles and chapters on these topics in peer-reviewed journals and the popular press. Sutton’s books include Weird Ideas That Work: 11 ½ Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation, The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Firms Turn Knowledge into Action (with Jeffrey Pfeffer), and Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management (with Jeffrey Pfeffer). The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t and Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…. and Survive the Worst are both New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers. His last book, Scaling-Up Excellence: Getting to More without Settling for Less (with Huggy Rao), was published in 2014 and is a Wall Street Journal and Publisher’s Weekly bestseller. Sutton's next book, The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt, will be published in September of 2017.

    Professor Sutton’s honors include the award for the best paper published in the Academy of Management Journal in 1989, the Eugene L. Grant Award for Excellence in Teaching, selection by Business 2.0 as a leading “management guru” in 2002, and the award for the best article published in the Academy of Management Review in 2005. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense was selected as the best business book of 2006 by the Toronto Globe and Mail. Sutton was named as one of 10 “B-School All-Stars” by BusinessWeek , which they described as “professors who are influencing contemporary business thinking far beyond academia.” In 2014, the London Business School honored Sutton with the Sumantra Ghoshal Award for Rigour and Relevance in the Study of Management.

    Sutton is a Fellow at IDEO, a Senior Scientist at Gallup, and academic director of two Stanford executive education programs:Customer-Focused Innovation and the online Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate. His personal website is at www.bobsutton.net and he also blogs at Harvard Business Review and as an “influencer” on LinkedIn. Sutton tweets @work_matters.

  • Robert Urstein

    Robert Urstein

    Lecturer, Graduate School of Business

    BioRob Urstein is a Lecturer in Management at the Stanford Graduate School of Business where he teaches courses on innovation in higher education. An experienced academic leader, Urstein has more than 25 years of professional experience managing academic programs and teaching, advising, and coaching high school students, undergraduates, graduate students, and executives. He collaborates on research projects and serves as a governing board member of the College Transition Collaborative, which brings together pioneering social psychologists, education researchers, and higher education practitioners to create learning environments that produce more equitable higher education outcomes.

    In addition to his teaching and research, Urstein is an Entrepreneur in Residence at Entangled Ventures, and a Senior Strategist at Entangled Solutions, where he works on projects to equitably transition society to a knowledge economy.

    Urstein spent more than twelve years in leadership roles at Stanford, including three years as Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Dean of Freshmen, and Director of Undergraduate Advising and Research, where he was responsible for the transition of new undergraduates to Stanford; academic advising; undergraduate research programs, and academic policy and progress. At the Graduate School of Business, Urstein served for eight years as Assistant Dean, leading the PhD Program, and for two years as Managing Director of Global Innovation Programs, where he managed a portfolio of on campus and international programs focused on leadership, innovation, and entrepreneurship. He has taught MBA students since 2008. Prior to Stanford, Urstein spent ten years teaching and coaching in an independent high school, and in 2000-01 he was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Oslo, Norway, working for the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Education. He has been at Stanford since 2004.