Graduate School of Education


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes. Image systems simulations of optics and sensors and image processing. Data and computation management for reproducible research.

  • Hans N. Weiler

    Hans N. Weiler

    Professor of Education and of Political Science, Emeritus and Academic Secretary to the University, Emeritus

    BioHans N. Weiler

    Professor Emeritus of Education and Political Science, and Academic Secretary, Emeritus, Stanford University
    Professor of Comparative Politics and Rektor, Emeritus, Viadrina European University, Frankfurt (Oder)

    Having been trained as a political scientist in Frankfurt/Main, Freiburg, and London,
    Hans N. Weiler has been a professor of education and political science at Stanford
    University since 1965, where he was instrumental in developing Stanford’s program
    in international development education (SIDEC). He was director of UNESCO’s
    International Institute for Educational Planning in Paris (IIEP) in the 1970s and has
    served as a consultant to a number of international organizations (including the
    World Bank and the African Development Bank), foundations and national
    governments in Europe, Africa, and South East Asia. At Stanford, he served as
    Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, as a University Fellow, and as Director of the
    Center for European Studies. He was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in
    the Behavioral Sciences, and has been awarded research fellowships and grants
    by, among others, the British Council, the Japan Society for the Promotion of
    Science, the Spencer Foundation, the Thyssen Foundation, the Friedrich Ebert
    Foundation, and the Deutsche Bank Foundation. In 1993, he was appointed a
    professor of comparative politics and elected the first Rektor (president) of Viadrina
    European University at Frankfurt (Oder), a position from which he retired in the fall
    of 1999. He chaired the Commission on Higher Education of the State of Saxony
    (1999-2002) and was instrumental in the founding and development of the Hertie
    School of Governance in Berlin from 2002 to 2009. He has served in a variety of
    advisory and consulting roles in German and European higher education between
    1999 and 2014. From 2014 to 2017, he served as Stanford’s Academic Secretary to
    the University.

    He has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the (private) Hertie School
    of Governance in Berlin, of the international boards of the Free University of Berlin
    and the Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, of the Advisory Board of the Center for Higher
    Education Development (CHE) in Germany, and of the Global Scientific Committee
    for UNESCO’s Forum on Higher Education, Research and Knowledge. His service
    as an evaluator includes the “Excellence Initiative” in German higher education, the
    Berlin Social Science Research Center (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin), the
    University of Freiburg, and various award competitions on research, teaching
    quality, and teacher education. His recent speaking engagements have included
    invited addresses in New York, Paris, Vienna, Budapest, San Francisco,
    Heidelberg, Berlin, Frankfurt/Main, Kuala Lumpur, Trieste, Johannesburg, Cape
    Town, Munich, Istanbul, and Stanford. He has been awarded the Order of Merit of
    the Republic of Poland (Commander’s Cross), of the Federal Republic of Germany
    (Bundesverdienstkreuz I. Kl.), and of the State of Brandenburg, as well as an
    honorary doctorate by Viadrina University, and honorary citizenship by the city of
    Frankfurt (Oder). His publications deal with the politics of educational change, the
    international politics of knowledge production, and the dynamics of reform and nonreform
    in higher education.

    Further information, including a list of publications and a
    more detailed CV, is available at www.stanford.edu/people/weiler.

    August, 2018

  • John Willinsky

    John Willinsky

    Khosla Family Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work under the auspices of the Public Knowledge Project which is focused on extending access to, and the accessibility of, research and scholarship. The research is on student, professional, and public access to this educational resource, while PKP also engages in developing and designing open source software (free) publishing systems to improve the public and scholarly quality of peer-reviewed journals. This also involves international collaborations in Latin America, Africa, and South-East Asia are aimed at helping to better understand and strengthen scholarly publishing in those areas.

  • Sam Wineburg

    Sam Wineburg

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDistinguishing what is true in our current digital morass; the teaching and learning of history

    Latest book, with co-author Mike Caulfield, "Verified: How to think straight, get duped less, and make better decisions about what to believe online."

    How young people make decisions about what to believe on the Internet.

    New forms of assessment to measure digital literacy

    The creation of Web-based environments for the learning and teaching of history

  • Maisha T. Winn

    Maisha T. Winn

    Professor of Education

    BioMaisha T. Winn is a Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Director of the Equity in Learning Initiative in the Stanford Accelerator for Learning. Her scholarship examines how non-dominant youth and communities have developed literate trajectories across a range of historical and contemporary settings within and outside formal schooling. She seeks to understand how communities that have been depicted as under resourced create practices, processes, and institutions of their own—and what we can learn from those examples to build more just, more collaborative, and more equitable futures. An ethnographer by training, Dr. Winn also engages in historical research focused on social movements in education.

    Dr. Winn has authored Writing in Rhythm: Spoken Word Poetry in Urban Classrooms; Black Literate Lives: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives; Girl Time: Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline; and Justice on Both Sides: Transforming Education through Restorative Justice. She co-edited Faith Made Flesh: The Black Child Legacy Campaign for Transformative Justice and Healthy Futures (with Lawrence “Torry” Winn, Vajra Watson, and Kindra F. Block); Restorative Justice in Education: Transforming Teaching and Learning through the Disciplines (with Lawrence “Torry” Winn); and Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry with Youth and Communities (with Django Paris). The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science; International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education; Review of Research in Education, Mind, Culture and Activity; and Anthropology & Education Quarterly are among the peer-reviewed journals that have published Dr. Winn’s work. Her forthcoming book, Futuring Black Lives: Independent Black Institutions and the Literary Imagination, examines the role of print culture during the Black Arts Movement (1965-1975) and how publications produced by independent Black institutions can serve as maps of/for the future of Black education.

    A 2022-23 Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford, Dr. Winn is an American Educational Research Association Fellow and the Association’s President-Elect, and a member of the National Academy of Education.

  • Caroline Winterer

    Caroline Winterer

    William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Classics and of Education

    BioCaroline Winterer is William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, and Professor by courtesy of Classics. She specializes in American history before 1900, especially the history of ideas, political thought, and the history of science. She is currently writing a book on the history of deep time in America, to be published by Princeton University Press.

    She teaches classes on American history until 1900, including American cultural and intellectual history, the American Enlightenment, the history of science, and the trans-Atlantic contexts of American thought.

    She is the author of five books, including most recently Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to Our Digital Era (Chicago, 2020), edited with her Stanford colleague Karen Wigen. Assembling a group of distinguished historians, cartographers, and art historians, the book shows how maps around the world for the last 500 years have ingeniously handled time in the spatial medium of maps.

    Her book American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale, 2016), showed how early Americans grappled with the promises of the Enlightenment – how they used new questions about the plants, animals, rocks, politics, religions and peoples of the New World to imagine a new relationship between the present and the past, and to spur far-flung conversations about a better future for all of humanity. Earlier books and articles have explored America's long tradition of looking at the ancient classical world for political, artistic, and cultural inspiration. She received an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/dear-sir-ben-franklin-would-like-to-add-you-to-his-network-180947639/.

    She is currently accepting graduate students. For more information on the PhD program in the Department of History, visit: https://history.stanford.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs.

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national, comparative, and longitudinal analyses of leadership and higher education with a focus on gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity.