Graduate School of Education


Showing 101-110 of 124 Results

  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz

    Dean of the Graduate School of Education and the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstructional methods, transfer of learning and assessment, mathematical development, teachable agents, cognition, and cognitive neuroscience.

  • Rich Shavelson

    Rich Shavelson

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAssessment of learning in higher education (including the Collegiate Learning Assessment); accountability in higher education; higher education policy.

  • Rebecca D. Silverman

    Rebecca D. Silverman

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on early language and literacy development and instruction.

  • Guillermo Solano-Flores

    Guillermo Solano-Flores

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research projects examine academic language and testing, formative assessment practices for culturally diverse science classrooms, and the design and use of illustrations in international test comparisons and in the testing of English language learners.

  • Mitchell L. Stevens

    Mitchell L. Stevens

    Professor of Education and. by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 04/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy most recent book is Seeing the World: How US Universities Make Knowledge in a Global Era, coauthored with Cynthia Miller-Idriss and Seteney Shami.

    With Ben Gebre-Medhin (UC Berkeley) I developed a synthetic account of change in US higher education.

    With Mike Kirst I edited a volume on the organizational ecology of US colleges and universities.

    With Arik Lifschitz and Michael Sauder I developed a theory of sports and status in US higher education.

    Earlier work on college admissions, home education, and (with Wendy Espeland) quantification continues to inform my scholarly world view.

  • Deborah Stipek

    Deborah Stipek

    Judy Koch Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarly childhood education (instruction and policy), math education for young children

  • Myra Strober

    Myra Strober

    Professor of Education, Emerita

    BioMyra Strober is a labor economist and Professor Emerita at the School of Education at Stanford University. She is also Professor of Economics at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University (by courtesy). Myra’s research and consulting focus on gender issues at the workplace, work and family, and multidisciplinarity in higher education. She is the author of numerous articles on occupational segregation, women in the professions and management, the economics of childcare, feminist economics and the teaching of economics. Myra’s most recent book is a memoir, Sharing the Work: What My Family and Career Taught Me About Breaking Through (and Holding the Door Open for Others) 2016). She is also co-author, with Agnes Chan, of The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan (1999).

    Myra is currently teaching a course on work and family at the Graduate School of Business.

    Myra was the founding director of the Stanford Center for Research on Women (now the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research). She was also the first chair of the National Council for Research on Women, a consortium of about 65 U.S. centers for research on women. Now the Council has more than 100 member centers. Myra was President of the International Association for Feminist Economics, and Vice President of the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund (now Legal Momentum). She was an associate editor of Feminist Economics and a member of the Board of Trustees of Mills College.

    Myra has consulted with several corporations on improved utilization of women in management and on work-family issues. She has also been an expert witness in cases involving the valuation of work in the home, sex discrimination, and sexual harassment.

    At the School of Education, Myra was Director of the Joint Degree Program, a master’s program in which students receive both an MA in education and an MBA from the Graduate School of Business. She also served as the Chair of the Program in Administration and Policy Analysis, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Acting Dean. Myra was on leave from Stanford for two years as the Program Officer in Higher Education at Atlantic Philanthropic Services (now Atlantic Philanthropies).

    Myra holds a BS degree in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University, an MA in economics from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. in economics from MIT.

  • Hariharan Subramonyam

    Hariharan Subramonyam

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioHari Subramonyam is an Assistant Professor (Research) at the Graduate School of Education and a Faculty Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered AI. He is also a member of the HCI Group at Stanford. His research focuses on augmenting critical human tasks (such as learning, creativity, and sensemaking) with AI by incorporating principles from cognitive psychology. He also investigates support tools for multidisciplinary teams to co-design AI experiences. His work has received multiple best paper awards at top human-computer interaction conferences, including CHI and IUI.

  • Rebecca Tarlau

    Rebecca Tarlau

    Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    BioRebecca Tarlau is Associate Professor of Education at Stanford Graduate School of Education. Dr. Tarlau was formerly Associate Professor of Education and of Labor and Employment Relations at the Pennsylvania State University, where she was the co-founder of the Penn State Consortium for Social Movements and Education Research and Practice. Her ethnographic research agenda has four broad areas of focus: (1) theories of the state and state-society relations; (2) social movements and popular education, labor education, and critical pedagogy; (3) Latin American education and development; and (4) teachers’ unions, teacher activism, and teachers’ work.

    Dr. Tarlau is the author of the award-winning Occupying School, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education (2019, Oxford University Press, published in Portuguese in 2023 by Expressão Popular), which analyzes how a large grassroots social movement has linked education reform to its vision for agrarian reform by developing pedagogical practices for schools that foster activism, direct democracy, and collective forms of work. Contrary to the belief that social movements cannot engage the state without demobilizing, Tarlau shows how educational institutions can help movements recruit new activists, diversify their membership, increase technical knowledge, and garner political power. Dr. Tarlau’s forthcoming book Teacher Organizing Across the Americas: Diverse Strategies for Transforming Unions, Schools and Societies (Oxford University Press) explores why teachers’ unions in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States have embraced radically different strategies, and the important role of internal oppositional movements in transforming the goals and strategies of labor unions. Currently Dr. Tarlau is involved in a multi-country comparative study analyzing the impact of sustainable agriculture education on agroecological knowledge and landscape change in Latin America.