Bio-X


Showing 61-70 of 79 Results

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Steven M. Corsello

    Steven M. Corsello

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioI am a physician scientist and medical oncologist at Stanford University. My laboratory operates at the intersection of functional genomics and chemical biology, with the goal of advancing novel molecular mechanisms of cancer inhibition to clinical use. We aim to 1) leverage phenotypic screening and functional genomics to determine novel anti-cancer mechanisms of small molecules, 2) develop new targeted therapy approaches in gastrointestinal cancer, and 3) build a comprehensive community resource for drug repurposing discovery.

  • Markus Covert

    Markus Covert

    Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is on building computational models of complex biological processes, and using them to guide an experimental program. Such an approach leads to a relatively rapid identification and validation of previously unknown components and interactions. Biological systems of interest include metabolic, regulatory and signaling networks as well as cell-cell interactions. Current research involves the dynamic behavior of NF-kappaB, an important family of transcription factors.

  • Tina Cowan

    Tina Cowan

    Professor of Pathology (Clinical) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsscreening and diagnosis of patients with inborn errors of metabolism, including newborn screening, development of new testing methods and genotype/phenotype correlations.

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    David Korn, MD, Professor of Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin and epigenetic regulation in living cells.

  • Jonas Cremer

    Jonas Cremer

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are a highly interdisciplinary research team, joined in our desire to better understand microbial life. To elucidate how bacterial cells accumulate biomass and grow, we work with the model organism Escherichia coli. We further focus on gut bacteria and their interactions with the human host. Our approaches combine quantitative experimentation and mathematical modeling.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCriddle's interests include microbial biotechnology for the circular economy, including recovery of clean water from used water, renewable energy, valuable materials that can replace fossil-carbon derived materials. Current projects include energy-efficient anaerobic wastewater treatment technology, assessment of new treatment trains that yield high quality water; fossil carbon plastics biodegradation, and biotechnology for production of bioplastics that can replace fossil carbon plastics.

  • Patricia Cross

    Patricia Cross

    Professor (Teaching) of Structural Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am not now actively involved in research, but my past endeavors remain central to my position in guiding medical students in their scholarship pursuits.
    The cited publications represent three areas of interest:
    (1) medical student research (Jacobs and Cross)
    (2) women in medicine (Cross and Steward)
    (3) the reproductive physiology of early development (Cross and Brinster)
    Only one publication is listed in this area since the research is not current, but others (in e.g. Nature, DevBiol, ExpCellRes) give a broader picture of my pursuit when at the University of Pennsylvania.