Bio-X


Showing 1-8 of 8 Results

  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Matt van de Rijn

    Matt van de Rijn

    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on gene microarray analysis of human soft tissue tumors (sarcomas). In addition we work with tissue microarrays to characterize large numbers of novel antisera raised against peptides derived from genes found to be of interest during gene array analysis.

  • Capucine Van Rechem

    Capucine Van Rechem

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy long-term interest lies in understanding the impact chromatin modifiers have on disease development and progression so that more optimal therapeutic opportunities can be achieved. My laboratory explores the direct molecular impact of chromatin-modifying enzymes during cell cycle progression, and characterizes the unappreciated and unconventional roles that these chromatin factors have on cytoplasmic function such as protein synthesis.

  • Benjamin Van Roy

    Benjamin Van Roy

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioBenjamin Van Roy is a Professor of Electrical Engineering, Management Science and Engineering, and, by courtesy, Computer Science, at Stanford University, where he has served on the faculty since 1998. His research focuses on understanding how an agent interacting with a poorly understood environment can learn over time to make effective decisions. He is interested in questions concerning what is possible or impossible as well as how to design efficient learning algorithms that achieve the possible. His research contributes to the fields of reinforcement learning, online optimization, and approximate dynamic programming, and offers means to addressing central problems of artificial intelligence.

    He has graduated fifteen doctoral students, published over forty articles in peer-reviewed journals, and been listed as an inventor in over a dozen patents. He has served on the editorial boards of Machine Learning, Mathematics of Operations Research, and Operations Research, for which he has also served as editor of the Financial Engineering Area. He has also founded and/or led research programs at several technology companies, including Unica (acquired by IBM), Enuvis (acquired by SiRF), and Morgan Stanley.

    He received the SB in Computer Science and Engineering and the SM and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT. He has been a recipient of the MIT George C. Newton Undergraduate Laboratory Project Award, the MIT Morris J. Levin Memorial Master's Thesis Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Management Science and Engineering Department's Graduate Teaching Award. He is an INFORMS Fellow and has been a Frederick E. Terman Fellow and a David Morgenthaler II Faculty Scholar. He has held visiting positions as the Wolfgang and Helga Gaul Visiting Professor at the University of Karlsruhe and as the Chin Sophonpanich Foundation Professor and the InTouch Professor at Chulalongkorn University.

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is focused on developing new MRI techniques. In particular, we are increasing the speed of MRI.

  • José G. Vilches-Moure

    José G. Vilches-Moure

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioDr. José G. Vilches-Moure, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor, received his DVM degree from Purdue University in Indiana in 2007. He completed his residency training in Anatomic Pathology (with emphasis in pathology of laboratory animal species) and his PhD in Comparative Pathology at the University of California-Davis. He joined Stanford in 2015, and is the Director of the Animal Histology Services (AHS). Dr. Vilches-Moure is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and his collaborative research interests include cardiac development and pathology, developmental pathology, and refinement of animal models in which to study early cancer detection techniques. His teaching interests include comparative anatomy/histology, general pathology, comparative pathology, and pathology of laboratory animal species.

  • Anne Villeneuve

    Anne Villeneuve

    Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms underlying homologous chromosome pairing, DNA recombination and chromosome remodeling during meiosis, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental system. High-resolution 3-D imaging of dynamic reorganization of chromosome architecture. Role of protease inhibitors in regulating sperm activation.

  • Jelena Vuckovic

    Jelena Vuckovic

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsnanophotonics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, optoelectronics, cavity QED