School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 69 Results

  • Martin Ma

    Martin Ma

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Resources Engineering

    BioMartin Ma is an NSERC Postdoc in Energy Resource Engineering at Stanford University. He graduated from the University of Alberta with a Doctoral degree in Petroleum Engineering in 2018. He also holds an MSc degree in Earth Science and Engineering from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and a BSc degree in Petroleum Engineering from the China University of Petroleum (East China). His current research topics include data-driven modeling, optimization, numerical simulation, heavy oil EOR. He has published many technical papers on artificial intelligence, heavy oil recovery, and reservoir characterization in peer-reviewed journals and SPE conferences. He also serves as a technical reviewer for serval journals. He is a registered engineer-in-Training (E.I.T.) member with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Alberta (APEGA) in Canada.

  • Michael Lindley Machala

    Michael Lindley Machala

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Resources Engineering

    BioMichael is a postdoctoral fellow whose interests encompass international development projects requiring productive energy use and how to increase their success through transdisciplinary approaches. He has a dual appointment in the Precourt Institute for Energy and the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. His current work focuses on understanding and reducing produce supply chain inefficiency in India from a systems perspective, while identifying and testing scalable interventions with on-the-ground partners and end-users. Michael completed a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering as an NSF Graduate Research Fellow at Stanford. His thesis focused on using fundamental research to develop design descriptors for improving solar-to-fuel and fuel-to-electricity conversion using electrochemistry.

    Michael’s interest in social and environmental impact work began in high school as the president of the region’s youth-led tobacco free coalition. The coalition was runner-up for National Youth Advocates of the Year given by the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids when Idaho (his home state) went tobacco-free. At Kenyon College, he self-designed a major in Chemical Physics to understand how related disciplines approach challenges in renewable energy technology development while co-captaining the men’s NCAA National Champion swim team.

    After graduating in 2009, Michael moved to Germany as a Transatlantic Renewable Energy Fellow to research low-cost solar cells while learning about the sociopolitical environment that placed Germany as a global leader in renewable energy integration. While there, he attended the UNFCCC COP15 climate summit with two other fellows. Leading up to and during the highly anticipated event, they wrote and published an educational blog for the public. After leaving Germany, Michael lived in Southeast Asia as a Henry Luce Scholar to gain first-hand experience with renewable energy integration in unelectrified regions of Laos and Cambodia. This experience informed his desire to continue work on energy equality and development around the world, particularly at the intersection with basic human needs.

  • Rachael Madison

    Rachael Madison

    Assistant Director of Student Services, Department of Geophysics - Geophysics

    Current Role at StanfordAssistant Director of Student Services, Department of Geophysics

  • Leslie Magoon

    Leslie Magoon

    Adjunct Professor, Department of Geological Sciences

    BioLes is currently an Adjunct Professor in the Basin and Petroleum System Modeling, a Stanford University Industrial affiliate program that he was one of the three co-originators in 2005. He graduated from the University of Oregon, Eugene, OR with a B.S. in biology in 1964 and a M.S. in Geology in 1966. He worked 8 years for Shell Oil Company in Exploration where he was the lead investigator in the Ventura-Santa Barbara Basin source rock and migration study, the first investigation of its type in exploration for this company. Les worked 30 years for the U.S. Geological Survey where he carried out resource assessment studies in Alaska, Colombia, Venezuela, and Canada. The Alaska studies included the Cook Inlet and North Slope. Since 1981, he has investigated and popularized the petroleum system through talks, courses, and AAPG Memoir 60, The Petroleum System—From Source to Trap, for which he and his co-editor received the R. H. Dott, Sr. Award in 1996. Published in 1994, this popular book was reprinted twice and sold out all 4,000 copies and is now only available in CD. In 2017, he received AAPG Honorary Member Award and in 2021 the AAPG Sidney Powers Memorial Award, the society's third highest and highest award, respectively.

  • Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Chemical reactions between fluids and minerals create the environments that are uniquely characteristic of Earth’s surface. For example, chemical weathering reactions support the growth of soils and organisms and regulate the flow of elements to the oceans. The rates of these reactions also control the release and storage of natural and human-derived contaminants. Over geologic timescales, mineral-fluid reactions have helped to maintain a mostly habitable planet. Over human timescales, these reactions will regulate our ability to use Earth’s resources, such as soils, waters, and minerals.

    My research focuses on the rates of reactions in different environments using a combination of geochemical tools, including isotope geochemistry, geochemical and hydrologic modeling, and geochronology in order to address the following themes: (1) defining the controls on mineral-fluid reactions rates in the environment (2) finding new approaches to use mineral-fluid reactions to safely store carbon dioxide in the subsurface; and (3) development of isotopic approaches to study mineral-fluid reactions in the environments of Earth’s past. To support these research themes, I have constructed a new mass spectrometer and clean lab facility capable of high precision geochemical and isotopic measurements, and teach a number of classes and short courses on reactive transport.

    Teaching
    My teaching focuses on introducing students to the questions and major challenges in low-temperature and environmental geochemistry, and the application of isotope geochemistry to environmental and geologic problems. In order to introduce incoming students to Earth surface processes, materials and geochemistry, I am also teaching a freshman seminar on forensic geoscience. At the graduate level, I offer classes on isotope geochemistry and modeling of environmental transformations and mass transfer processes (i.e., subsurface reactive transport).

  • Gail Mahood

    Gail Mahood

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrigin and evolution of silicic magmas expressed in rhyolitic volcanic centers and shallow plutons; geologic histories of calderas; high-precision Ar-Ar geochronology applied to caldera-forming eruptions and flood basalts; formation of lithium deposits in volcanic environments; volcanic hazards in eastern California and western Saudi Arabia, geothermal systems; geoarchaeology