School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 29 Results

  • Simone D'Amico

    Simone D'Amico

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioSimone D’Amico is an Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, California, USA. He is founder and director of the Stanford's Space Rendezvous Lab (SLAB). He is a Terman Faculty Fellow of the School of Engineering. He holds a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the Technical University of Delft (The Netherlands) and received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Politecnico di Milano (Italy). He has been working as researcher at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) from 2003 to 2013 in the fields of space flight dynamics, autonomous satellite navigation and control, spacecraft formation-flying, and on-orbit servicing.

    Dr. D’Amico gave key contributions to the design, development, and operations of spacecraft formation-flying and rendezvous missions such as GRACE, TanDEM-X, and PRISMA for which he received several awards. He developed the Spaceborne Autonomous Formation Flying Experiment (SAFE), the Advanced Rendezvous demonstration using GPS and Optical Navigation (ARGON) on PRISMA and the TanDEM-X Autonomous Formation Flying (TAFF) system. More recently he has been working on the design of the GPS-based navigation system for the DEOS and PROBA-3 formation-flying missions. He acted as PI of the Autonomous Vision Approach-Navigation and Target Identification (AVANTI) experiment on-board the FireBIRD mission.

    Dr. D'Amico's current research aims at enabling future distributed space systems for unprecedented science and exploration. These include spacecraft formation-flying, rendezvous and docking, swarms and fractionated spacecraft. His efforts lie at the intersection of advanced astrodynamics, GN&C, and space system engineering to fulfill the tight requirements posed by these novel space architectures. The most recent mission concept developed by Dr. D'Amico is a miniaturized distributed occulter/telescope (mDOT) system for direct imaging of exozodiacal dust and exoplanets. Dr. D'Amico is spearheading a gravitational space science and exploration program at Stanford based on multiple drag-free micro-satellites.

    He has over 100 scientific publications including conference proceedings, peer-reviewed journal articles, and book chapters. He is peer reviewer for various AIAA and IEEE journals. He has been nominated in 2008, 2011, 2012, and 2013 as Excellent Reviewer for the AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. He has been Programme Committee Member (2008), Co-Chair (2011), and Chair (2013) of the International Symposium on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions and Technologies. He is Programme Committee Member of the International Workshop on Satellite Constellations and Formation Flying since 2013. He is Associate Editor of the AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics and the Journal of Space Science and Engineering. He is Associate Member of the Omega Alpha Association for Systems Engineering.

  • John O. Dabiri

    John O. Dabiri

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Dabiri Lab conducts research at the intersection of fluid mechanics, energy and environment, and biology.

  • William Dally

    William Dally

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering

    BioDally investigates methods for applying VLSI technology to solve information processing problems. His current projects include network architecture, multicomputer architecture, media-processor architecture, and high-speed (4Gb/s) CMOS signaling. His research involves demonstrating novel concepts with working systems. Previous systems include the MARS Hardware Accelerator, the Torus Routing Chip, the J-Machine, M-Machine, and the Reliable Router. His group has pioneered techniques including fast capability-based addressing, processor coupling, virtual channel flow control, wormhole routing, link-level retry, message-driven processing, and deadlock-free routing.

  • Eric Darve

    Eric Darve

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Darve's research is focused on the development of numerical methods for large scale scientific computing with applications in biomolecular simulations, acoustics, electromagnetics, and microfluidics. In these applications, the computational expense of simulating large and complex systems is very significant and in many instances beyond current computer capabilities. He is developing innovative numerical techniques to reduce this computational expense and enable the simulation of complex systems over realistic time scales. Professor Darve also uses processors with novel architectures, such as GPUs and the Cell processor, for scientific computing. Applications range from particle simulation to fluid dynamics and solving partial differential equations.

  • Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering and of Surgery

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • David Davidson

    David Davidson

    Sr Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering

    BioEducation
    University of Toronto Physics B.S (1978)
    University of Toronto Aerospace Sciences M.Sc. (1980)
    York University Physics Ph.D. (1986)

    Appointment:
    1986-present Senior Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering Department

    Research Activities:
    Dr. Davidson’s research interests span the fields of gas dynamics and combustion kinetics. During his tenure at Stanford University he has developed a wide array of optical and laser-based diagnostic methods for combustion chemistry and propulsion studies and has advanced the use of these diagnostics in shock tubes. He currently manages the shock tube operations in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratories at Stanford University and actively mentors the approximately two dozen graduate students who use these facilities. He is a co-author of over 200 research publications and has been a member of the editorial advisory board for the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics and secretary of the Western States Section of the Combustion Institute.
    An overview of the shock tube studies performed at Stanford under Prof. Hanson’s and Dr. Davidson’s supervision can be found in the six volumes entitled “Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements” available at http://purl.stanford.edu/kb621cw6967.