School of Engineering


Showing 1-5 of 5 Results

  • Tanja Aitamurto

    Tanja Aitamurto

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Management Science and Engineering

    BioI am a social scientist influenced heavily by engineering sciences. My work examines civic technologies for informing, empowering, and connecting people. The empirical contexts range from virtual, mixed, and augmented reality to large-scale online collaboration systems, such as applications of collective intelligence in open and participatory journalism, deliberation and policy-making, civic crowdfunding, and applications of artificial intelligence for civic use. I develop interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks by drawing on social psychology, democratic theory, computer science, and information systems. My work has been recognized with a number of awards and published in top journals, such as New Media & Society, Design Issues, Information, Communication & Society and International Journal of Communication.

    I am a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford, where I work in the Crowdsourced Democracy Team. I received my PhD in social sciences at the School of Communication, Media and Theatre at the University of Tampere in Finland in 2014. Previously I worked as a postdoctoral Brown Fellow and as Deputy Director of the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at Stanford. During my doctoral studies, I studied as a visiting student researcher at Stanford and at UC Berkeley

    In my dissertation “Collective Intelligence in Open Journalism: Power, Knowledge and Value”, I introduced a theory of open journalism. My dissertation received the Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award from the International Communication Association (ICA). Drawing from several empirical cases, I showed how the building blocks of collective intelligence—a large number of participants and cognitive, demographic, and socioeconomic diversity within the crowd—both support and challenge journalistic norms, practices, and values through open journalism.

    My studies often have unique in-the-wild experiments, in which I collaborate with media organizations and local and national governments. I have designed and developed several online platforms and processes for crowdsourced journalism and policymaking and advised local and national governments in participatory policymaking projects. Currently I'm working with the city of Palo Alto on a crowdsourced urban planning strategy process.

    More about my work at www.tanjaaitamurto.com

  • Heather Altman

    Heather Altman

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2015

    BioHeather is interested in team dynamics in global work environments, in particular how teams coordinate and collaborate to promote creativity and innovation. Her current research project investigates the work factors and team dynamics that influence innovation across cultures. Heather holds a B.A. with honors in Psychology from Stanford University.

  • Kristen M. Altenburger

    Kristen M. Altenburger

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2015

    BioI am a third year PhD candidate in the Management Science & Engineering Department at Stanford University and am a member of the Social Algorithms Lab. My research interests include social network analysis, machine learning, and causal inference.

  • Imanol Arrieta Ibarra

    Imanol Arrieta Ibarra

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2014

    BioImanol Arrieta Ibarra is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

    Research Area: Computational Social Science

    Dissertation Title: Personalized experimental designs in social systems

  • Itai Ashlagi

    Itai Ashlagi

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioItai Ashlagi is an Assistant Professor at the Management Science & Engineering Department.
    He is interested in game theory and the design and analysis of marketplaces. He is especially interested in matching markets, for which he developed mechanisms using tools from operations/cs and economics. His work influenced the practice of Kidney exchange, for which he has become a Franz Edelman Laureate. Ashlagi received his PhD in operations research from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
    Before coming to Stanford he was an assistant professor of Operations Management at Sloan, MIT and prior to that a postdoctoral researcher at HBS. He is the recipient of the outstanding paper award in the ACM conference of Electronic Commerce 2009. His research is supported by the NSF including an NSF-CAREER award.