School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Wei Cai

    Wei Cai

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioPredicting mechanical strength of materials through theory and simulations of defect microstructures across atomic, mesoscopic and continuum scales. Developing new atomistic simulation methods for long time-scale processes, such as crystal growth and self-assembly. Applying machine learning techniques to materials research. Modeling and experiments on the metallurgical processes in metal 3D printing. Understanding microstructure-property relationship in materials for stretchable electronics, such as carbon nanotube networks and semiconducting elastomers.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli received his B.Sc. degree in Physics (McGill, 1980), and M.A.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Sciences (Toronto, 1983, 1987). He joined Stanford University in 1987 and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director of the Engineering Physics Program. He carries out research in applied plasma physics with applications to a broad range of fields, including space propulsion, aerodynamics, medicine, materials synthesis, and fusion.

  • J. Edward Carryer

    J. Edward Carryer

    Adjunct Professor

    BioEd Carryer graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1975 with a BSE as a member of the first graduating class of the Education and Experience in Engineering Program. This innovative project-based learning program taught him that he could learn almost anything that he needed to know and set him on a path of lifelong learning. That didn’t, however, keep him from going back to school.

    Upon completion of his Master’s Degree in Bio-Medical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison in 1978, he was seduced by his love of cars, and instead of going into medical device design, he went to work for Ford on the 1979 Turbocharged Mustang. In later programs at Ford, he got to apply the background that he had gained in electronics and microcontrollers during his graduate work to the 1983 Turbocharged Mustang and Thunderbird and the 1984 SVO Mustang. After leaving Ford, Ed worked on the design and implementation of engine control software for GM and on a stillborn development program to put a turbocharged engine into the Renault Alliance at AMC before deciding to return once again to school. At Stanford University, he did research in the engine lab and earned his PhD in 1992.

    While working on his PhD, Ed got involved in teaching the graduate course sequence in mechatronics that is known at Stanford as Smart Product Design. He took over teaching the courses first part time in 1989, then full time after completing his PhD. In teaching mechatronics, Ed seems to have found his calling. The integration of mechanical, electronic, and software design with teaching others how to use all of this to make new products hits all his buttons. He is currently a Consulting Professor and the Director of the Smart Product Design Lab (SPDL). He teaches graduate courses in mechatronics in the Mechanical Engineering department and an undergraduate course in mechatronics in the Electrical Engineering department.

    Since 1984, Ed has maintained a consultancy focused on helping firms apply electronics and software in the creation of integrated electromechanical solutions (in 1984, almost no one was using the term mechatronics).The projects that he has worked on include an engine controller for an outboard motor manufacturer, an automated blood gas analyzer, a turbocharger boost control system for a new type of turbocharger, and a heated glove for arctic explorers. His most recent project involved using ZigBee radios and local structural model evaluation to create a wireless network of intelligent sensors to monitor and evaluate the structural health of buildings and transportation infrastructure.

  • Dennis R Carter

    Dennis R Carter

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Carter studies the influence of mechanical loading upon the growth, development, regeneration, and aging of skeletal tissues. Basic information from such studies is used to understand skeletal diseases and treatments. He has served as President of the Orthopaedic Research Society and is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioOur group's research is focused at the intersection of mechanics and biology. We are interested in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that give rise to the complex mechanical properties of cells, extracellular matrices, and tissues . Conversely, we are investigating how complex mechanical cues influence important biological processes such as cell division, differentiation, or cancer progression. Our approaches involve using force measurement instrumentation, such as atomic force microscopy, to exert and measure forces on materials and cells at the nanoscale, and the development of material systems for 3D cell culture that allow precise and independent manipulation of mechanical properties.

  • Helen L. Chen

    Helen L. Chen

    Research Scientist

    BioHelen L. Chen is a research scientist in the Designing Education Lab in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She holds an undergraduate degree in communication from UCLA and a PhD in communication with a minor in psychology from Stanford. Helen is a board member for the Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL) and is a co-author of Documenting Learning with ePortfolios: A Guide for College Instructors and co-executive editor of the International Journal of ePortfolio. She works closely with the Association of American Colleges and Universities and consults with institutions on general education redesign, authentic assessment approaches, design thinking, and personal branding and ePortfolios. Helen's current research and scholarship focus on engineering and entrepreneurship education; the pedagogy of portfolios and reflective practice in higher education; and redesigning how learning is recorded and recognized in traditional transcripts and academic credentials.

  • William Cockayne

    William Cockayne

    Lecturer

    BioBill is an innovation evangelist, inventor, and member of Stanford Design.

    A long-time Lecturer in the School of Engineering, he currently leads the Stanford Foresight research program, the university’s Silicon Valley Innovation Academy, the Moonshot Garage, and his award-winning course series to “design the future”, ME410ABC Foresight & Innovation.

    Across these programs, Bill empowers students to practice building the better future we all want, by converting long-range, technology-enabled visions into today’s radical innovations. This work has been scaled from a small emerging technology research focus (in partnership with Dr. John Feland) to become the long-running ME410 course series, which provided a stepping stone in the late 00s to power Stanford University’s Silicon Valley Innovation Academy with Dr. Tamara Carleton, which develops and launches over two-hundred moonshot leaders each year to tackle game-changing opportunities across the globe. He and his team now lead the Moonshot Alliance, a global expansion of these innovation-enabling programs, which has it’s own Moonshot Garage at Stanford.

    The culmination of Stanford Foresight’s early work in vision-led innovation is available in “The Playbook for Strategic Foresight and Innovation—A Hands-on Guide for Modeling, Designing and Leading Your Company's Next Radical Innovation” authored by Dr. Carleton, which can be downloaded as a free PDF from https://www.innovation.io/playbook and found in print at Amazon.

    Companies that Bill has worked with run the gamut: [As an employee] Apple Computer, DaimlerBenz Research & Technology, Eastman Kodak, SK Telecom; [That he founded] Scout Electromedia, Handstand; [Collaborated on foresight-led innovation] Airbus Group, Aalto University, Bank of the West, Crown Confectionery Co., Deutsche Bahn, Deutsche Bank, Forbes Marshall, Fortum, Institute for the Future (IFTF), Luleå University of Technology, Mahindra, Microsoft, Panasonic Corporation , Royal Institute of Technology [KTH], Sweden, Samsung Electronics, SAP, SKF Group, South Africa Energy Sector Education & Training Authority (ESETA), South Africa Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SSETA), South Africa Transport Education & Training Authority (TETA), Tata Chemicals Ltd., Tekes, UPM, Volkswagen/Audi, Volvo Aero, Volvo Construction Equipment (CE), Volvo IT, YLE, and likely a handful more.

    Bill holds a Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering – Design from Stanford University where he was a researcher in the Center for Design Research studying the emergence of new ideas and new teams in Silicon Valley’s innovation ecosystem with Professors Larry Leifer, Woody Powell, and Steve Barley, and a Master in Computer Science from the Naval Postgraduate School where he was part of the ground-breaking NPSnet lab under Professor Mike Zyda, a researcher on Dr. Rick Satava’s DARPA Advanced Biomedical Training Program seeking to immerse a person wholly into virtual reality using two-handed haptics and omni-directional treadmills, and a co-founder of the Modelling, Virtual Environments, and Simulations degree which brought together the school’s Computer Science and Operations Research expertise.