School of Engineering


Showing 1-9 of 9 Results

  • Wei Cai

    Wei Cai

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioPredicting mechanical strength of materials through theory and simulations of defect microstructures across atomic, mesoscopic and continuum scales. Developing new atomistic simulation methods for long time-scale processes, such as crystal growth and self-assembly. Applying machine learning techniques to materials research. Modeling and experiments on the metallurgical processes in metal 3D printing. Understanding microstructure-property relationship in materials for stretchable electronics, such as carbon nanotube networks and semiconducting elastomers.

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli received his B.Sc. degree in Physics (McGill, 1980), and M.A.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Sciences (Toronto, 1983, 1987). He joined Stanford University in 1987 and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director of the Engineering Physics Program. He carries out research in applied plasma physics with applications to a broad range of fields, including space propulsion, aerodynamics, medicine, materials synthesis, and fusion.

  • J. Edward Carryer

    J. Edward Carryer

    Adjunct Professor

    BioEd Carryer graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1975 with a BSE as a member of the first graduating class of the Education and Experience in Engineering Program. This innovative project-based learning program taught him that he could learn almost anything that he needed to know and set him on a path of lifelong learning. That didn’t, however, keep him from going back to school.

    Upon completion of his Master’s Degree in Bio-Medical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison in 1978, he was seduced by his love of cars, and instead of going into medical device design, he went to work for Ford on the 1979 Turbocharged Mustang. In later programs at Ford, he got to apply the background that he had gained in electronics and microcontrollers during his graduate work to the 1983 Turbocharged Mustang and Thunderbird and the 1984 SVO Mustang. After leaving Ford, Ed worked on the design and implementation of engine control software for GM and on a stillborn development program to put a turbocharged engine into the Renault Alliance at AMC before deciding to return once again to school. At Stanford University, he did research in the engine lab and earned his PhD in 1992.

    While working on his PhD, Ed got involved in teaching the graduate course sequence in mechatronics that is known at Stanford as Smart Product Design. He took over teaching the courses first part time in 1989, then full time after completing his PhD. In teaching mechatronics, Ed seems to have found his calling. The integration of mechanical, electronic, and software design with teaching others how to use all of this to make new products hits all his buttons. He is currently a Consulting Professor and the Director of the Smart Product Design Lab (SPDL). He teaches graduate courses in mechatronics in the Mechanical Engineering department and an undergraduate course in mechatronics in the Electrical Engineering department.

    Since 1984, Ed has maintained a consultancy focused on helping firms apply electronics and software in the creation of integrated electromechanical solutions (in 1984, almost no one was using the term mechatronics).The projects that he has worked on include an engine controller for an outboard motor manufacturer, an automated blood gas analyzer, a turbocharger boost control system for a new type of turbocharger, and a heated glove for arctic explorers. His most recent project involved using ZigBee radios and local structural model evaluation to create a wireless network of intelligent sensors to monitor and evaluate the structural health of buildings and transportation infrastructure.

  • Dennis R Carter

    Dennis R Carter

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Carter studies the influence of mechanical loading upon the growth, development, regeneration, and aging of skeletal tissues. Basic information from such studies is used to understand skeletal diseases and treatments. He has served as President of the Orthopaedic Research Society and is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the physics of cell migration, division, and morphogenesis in 3D, as well cell-matrix mechanotransduction, or the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices. For both these areas, we use engineered biomaterials for 3D culture as artificial extracellular matrices.

  • Helen L. Chen

    Helen L. Chen

    Research Scientist

    BioHelen L. Chen is a research scientist in the Designing Education Lab in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She holds an undergraduate degree in communication from UCLA and a PhD in communication with a minor in psychology from Stanford. Helen is a board member for the Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL) and is a co-author of Documenting Learning with ePortfolios: A Guide for College Instructors and co-executive editor of the International Journal of ePortfolio. She works closely with the Association of American Colleges and Universities and consults with institutions on general education redesign, authentic assessment approaches, design thinking, and personal branding and ePortfolios. Helen's current research and scholarship focus on engineering and entrepreneurship education; the pedagogy of portfolios and reflective practice in higher education; and redesigning how learning is recorded and recognized in traditional transcripts and academic credentials.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • Mark Cutkosky

    Mark Cutkosky

    Fletcher Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioCutkosky applies analyses, simulations, and experiments to the design and control of robotic hands, tactile sensors, and devices for human/computer interaction. In manufacturing, his work focuses on design tools for rapid prototyping.