School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 216 Results

  • Scott Calvert

    Scott Calvert

    Sr. Associate Dean for Administration, School of Engineering

    BioScott Calvert is responsible for school operations including finance, HR, IT, facilities, and research administration. He held a similar position at Stanford in the office of the vice provost for undergraduate education prior to joining the engineering team. Before coming to Stanford, Scott was a Navy fighter pilot for 21 years after receiving a commission through the NROTC program at Duke University where he earned a BSE in mechanical engineering. He made numerous deployments aboard aircraft carriers flying F-14s and F/A-18s, and between squadron assignments, he attended US Navy Test Pilot School on a cooperative program with the Naval Postgraduate School where he earned an MSAE in aeronautical engineering. In addition, he has an MBA from Columbia University.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Mechanical Engineering

    BioDavid B. Camarillo is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Léopold Cambier

    Léopold Cambier

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2015

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFast Sparse Linear Solvers

  • Emmanuel Candes

    Emmanuel Candes

    Barnum-Simons Chair in Math and Statistics, and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioEmmanuel Candès is the Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, a professor of electrical engineering (by courtesy) and a member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. Earlier, Candès was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, statistics, information theory, signal processing and mathematical optimization with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing and inverse problems. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

    Candès has received several awards including the Alan T. Waterman Award from NSF, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation, and which recognizes the achievements of early-career scientists. He has given over 60 plenary lectures at major international conferences, not only in mathematics and statistics but in many other areas as well including biomedical imaging and solid-state physics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.