School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Grace Gao

    Grace Gao

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioGrace Gao is an assistant professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. She leads the Navigation and Autonomous Vehicles Laboratory (NAV Lab). Before joining Stanford University, she was faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She obtained her Ph.D. degree at Stanford University. Her research is on robust and secure perception, localization and navigation with applications to manned and unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous driving cars, as well as space robotics.

    Prof. Gao has won a number of awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, the Institute of Navigation Early Achievement Award and the RTCA William E. Jackson Award. She received the Distinguished Promotion Award from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has won Best Paper/Presentation of the Session Awards 14 times at ION GNSS+ conferences. She received the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research from the College of Engineering, University of Illinois. For her teaching, Prof. Gao has been on the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students at University of Illinois multiple times. She won the College of Engineering Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence, the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising, and AIAA Illinois Chapter’s Teacher of the Year.

  • James F Gibbons

    James F Gibbons

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioA pioneer in the use of ion implantation and rapid thermal process techniques for solid-state physics, Gibbons also conducts research into semiconductor device analysis, fabrication, and process physics. Current research is focused on the growth and processing of thin semiconductor films and nanostructures that offer potential for advanced semiconductor and optical device development.

  • John Gill

    John Gill

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioGill's research interests are in the areas of computational complexity theory and information theory, including probabilistic computation, lossless data compression, and error correcting codes.

  • Bernd Girod

    Bernd Girod

    Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGirod's research focuses on algorithms and systems for multimedia analysis and communication. Applications range from wireless media delivery to interactive video streaming to mobile visual search and augmented reality.

  • Gary Glover

    Gary Glover

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy present research is devoted to the advancement of functional magnetic resonance imaging sciences for applications in basic understanding of the brain in health and disease. We collaborate closely with departmental clinicians and with others in the school of medicine, humanities, and the engineering sciences.

  • Andrea Goldsmith

    Andrea Goldsmith

    Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering, Emerita

    BioAndrea Goldsmith is currently the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science at Princeton University. She was previously the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford until her retirement in 2020, where she is now the Harris Professor emerita. She joined Stanford as a faculty member in Electrical Engineering in 1999. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience. She co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer and Board member of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the Board of Directors for Medtronic (MDT) and Crown Castle Inc. (CCI). She has also been a member or chair of the technical advisory boards for Quantenna (QTNA), Sequans (SQNS), Interdigital (IDCC) and Cohere. Goldsmith has launched and led several multi-university research projects including DARPA’s ITMANET program, and she is currently a Principal Investigator in the NSF Center on the Science of Information. Prior to Stanford she held positions at Caltech, Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the Marconi Prize, the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Technical Field Award in Communications Technology, the IEEE Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award, the ComSoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award as well as Technical Achievement Awards in Communications Theory and in Wireless Communications, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications'' and “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She has served in various leadership roles in the IEEE and in industrial groups aimed at diversifying STEM fields, and is currently the founding chair of the IEEE Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Professional Ethics. At Stanford she has served as chair and a member of the Faculty Senate and on the Planning and Policy Board, Committee on Research, Commissions on Graduate Education and on Undergraduate Education, Task Force on Women and Leadership, and the Faculty Women's Forum Steering Committee. She currently serves on Stanford's Budget Group, Advisory Board, and in the Faculty Senate.

  • Robert M Gray

    Robert M Gray

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research falls in the intersection of Shannon information theory and signal processing. In particular, I am interested in the theory and design of block codes and sliding-block (or stationary or time-invariant) codes for data compression and their relation to each other. Block codes are far better understood and more widely used, but their lack of stationarity causes difficulties in theory and artifacts in practice. Very little is known about the design of good sliding-block codes, but the problem is known to be equivalent to the design of entropy-constrained simulators of complex random processes. I also do research in the history of information theory and signal processing, especially in the development of speech processing systems and real time signal processing.