School of Engineering


Showing 1-11 of 11 Results

  • Monica Lam

    Monica Lam

    Kleiner Perkins, Mayfield, Sequoia Capital Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and the Faculty Director of the Stanford Open Virtual Assistant Laboratory. Dr. Monica Lam obtained her BS degree in computer science from University of British Columbia, and her PhD degree in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. She joined Stanford in 1988.

    Professor Lam's current research is on conversational virtual assistants with an emphasis on privacy protection. Her research uses deep learning to map task-oriented natural language dialogues into formal semantics, represented by a new executable programming language called ThingTalk. Her Almond virtual assistant, trained on open knowledge graphs and IoT API standards, can be easily customized to perform new tasks. She is leading an Open Virtual Assistant Initiative to create the largest, open, crowdsourced language semantics model to promote open access in all languages. Her decentralized Almond virtual assistant that supports fine-grain sharing with privacy has received Popular Science's Best of What's New Award in Security in 2019.

    Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. She is a co-author of the classic compiler textbook, popularly known as the “dragon book”. She was on the founding team of Tensilica, now a part of Cadence.

    Dr. Lam is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow.

  • James Landay

    James Landay

    Denning Co-Director (Acting) of Stanford HAI, Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanday's current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change (especially for health and sustainability), Demonstrational User Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, Cross-Cultural Interface Design, Human-Centered AI, and User Interface Design Tools. He has developed tools, techniques, and a top professional book on Web Interface Design.

  • Cynthia Bailey (Lee)

    Cynthia Bailey (Lee)

    Senior Lecturer of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have a PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego, in the area of High-Performance Computing (HPC), specifically market-based scheduling algorithms. My graduate research was done as part of San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC)'s Performance Modeling and Characterization Lab (PMaC), where I investigated economic models of scheduling on high performance computing systems. My adviser was Allan Snavely of SDSC.

    My dissertation abstract is as follows: Effective management of Grid and HPC resources is essential to maximizing return on the substantial infrastructure investment these resources entail. An important prerequisite to effective resource management is productive interaction between the user and scheduler. My work analyzes several aspects of the user-scheduler relationship and develops solutions to three of the most vexing barriers between the two. First, users' monetary valuation of compute time and schedule turnaround time is examined in terms of a utility function. Second, responsiveness of the scheduler to users' varied valuations is optimized via a genetic algorithm heuristic, creating a controlled market for computation. Finally, the chronic problem of inaccurate user runtime requests, and its implications for scheduler performance, is examined, along with mitigation techniques.

    My current research projects are in the area of Computer Science Education, with an emphasis on assessment and the use of Peer Instruction pedagogy in lecture. With colleagues Mark Guzdial, Leo Porter, and Beth Simon, I run the New CS Faculty Teaching Workshop, an annual "bootcamp" on how to teach effectively that draws attendees from dozens of the top CS programs in the country. The short-term goal is to give newly-hired faculty entering their first year of teaching the skills they need to succeed for themselves and their students. The long-term goal is to transform undergraduate education in CS by seeding our best rising stars with best practices so they can create communities of practice as their institutions and mentor their students in active learning strategies, creating a culture where these are the new norm.

  • Jure Leskovec

    Jure Leskovec

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioJure Leskovec is Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is affiliated with the Stanford AI Lab, Machine Learning Group and the Center for Research on Foundation Models. In the past, he served as a Chief Scientist at Pinterest and was an investigator at Chan Zuckerberg BioHub. Leskovec recently pioneered the field of Graph Neural Networks and co-authored PyG, the most widely-used graph neural network library. Research from his group has been used by many countries to fight COVID-19 pandemic, and has been incorporated into products at Facebook, Pinterest, Uber, YouTube, Amazon, and more.

    His research received several awards including Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship in 2011, Okawa Research award in 2012, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in 2012, Lagrange Prize in 2015, and ICDM Research Contributions Award in 2019. His research contributions have spanned social networks, data mining and machine learning, and computational biomedicine with the focus on drug discovery. His work has won 12 best paper awards and 5 10-year test of time awards at a premier venues in these research areas.

    Leskovec received his bachelor's degree in computer science from University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, PhD in machine learning from Carnegie Mellon University and postdoctoral training at Cornell University.

  • Philip Levis

    Philip Levis

    Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Levis' research focuses on the design and implementation of efficient software systems for embedded wireless sensor networks; embedded network sensor architecture and design; systems programming and software engineering.

  • Marc Levoy

    Marc Levoy

    VMware Founders Professor in Computer Science and Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioLevoy's current interests include the science and art of photography, computational photography, light field sensing and display, and applications of computer graphics in microscopy and biology.

  • Percy Liang

    Percy Liang

    Associate Professor of Computer Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Statistics

    BioPercy Liang is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University (B.S. from MIT, 2004; Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, 2011) and the director of the Center for Research on Foundation Models (CRFM). He is currently focused on making foundation models (in particular, language models) more accessible through open-source and understandable through rigorous benchmarking. In the past, he has worked on many topics centered on machine learning and natural language processing, including robustness, interpretability, human interaction, learning theory, grounding, semantics, and reasoning. He is also a strong proponent of reproducibility through the creation of CodaLab Worksheets. His awards include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2019), IJCAI Computers and Thought Award (2016), an NSF CAREER Award (2016), a Sloan Research Fellowship (2015), a Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship (2014), and paper awards at ACL, EMNLP, ICML, COLT, ISMIR, CHI, UIST, and RSS.

  • Scott W Linderman

    Scott W Linderman

    Assistant Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioScott is an Assistant Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. He is also an Institute Scholar in the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Stanford AI Lab. His lab works at the intersection of machine learning and computational neuroscience, developing statistical methods to analyze large scale neural data. Previously, Scott was a postdoctoral fellow with Liam Paninski and David Blei at Columbia University, and he completed his PhD in Computer Science at Harvard University with Ryan Adams and Leslie Valiant. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Cornell University and spent three years as a software engineer at Microsoft before graduate school.

  • C. Karen Liu

    C. Karen Liu

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioC. Karen Liu is a professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. Prior to joining Stanford, Liu was a faculty member at the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech. She received her Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Washington. Liu's research interests are in computer graphics and robotics, including physics-based animation, character animation, optimal control, reinforcement learning, and computational biomechanics. She developed computational approaches to modeling realistic and natural human movements, learning complex control policies for humanoids and assistive robots, and advancing fundamental numerical simulation and optimal control algorithms. The algorithms and software developed in her lab have fostered interdisciplinary collaboration with researchers in robotics, computer graphics, mechanical engineering, biomechanics, neuroscience, and biology. Liu received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and was named Young Innovators Under 35 by Technology Review. In 2012, Liu received the ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award for her contribution in the field of computer graphics.