School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 11 Results

  • Ali Mani

    Ali Mani

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioAli Mani is an associate professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He is a faculty affiliate of the Center for Turbulence Research and a member of Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford in 2009. Prior to joining the faculty in 2011, he was an engineering research associate at Stanford and a senior postdoctoral associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Department of Chemical Engineering. His research group builds and utilizes large-scale high-fidelity numerical simulations, as well as methods of applied mathematics, to develop quantitative understanding of transport processes that involve strong coupling with fluid flow and commonly involve turbulence or chaos. His teaching includes the undergraduate engineering math classes and graduate courses on fluid mechanics and numerical analysis.

  • Alison Marsden

    Alison Marsden

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases, and Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab at Stanford develops novel computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, and medical devices. We have a particular interest in pediatric cardiology, and use virtual surgery to design novel surgical concepts for children born with heart defects.

  • Todd Martinez

    Todd Martinez

    David Mulvane Ehrsam and Edward Curtis Franklin Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAb initio molecular dynamics, photochemistry, molecular design, mechanochemistry, graphical processing unit acceleration of electronic structure and molecular dynamics, automated reaction discovery, ultrafast (femtosecond and attosecond) chemical phenomena

  • Paul McIntyre

    Paul McIntyre

    Rick and Melinda Reed Professor, Professor of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioMcIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

  • Ariam Mogos

    Ariam Mogos

    Lecturer

    BioAriam Mogos leads emerging technology initiatives at Stanford's Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), where she helps students and educators work with emerging technologies like AI and blockchain, and shapes conversations around the tech’s ethical implications on humans and nature. Her design work and research also investigates the ways that technology can foster playful learning experiences that bridge communities and cultures.

  • Parviz Moin

    Parviz Moin

    Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioMoin is the founding director of the Center for Turbulence Research. Established in 1987 as a research consortium between NASA and Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research is devoted to fundamental studies of turbulent flows. Center of Turbulence Research is widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research, attracting diverse groups of researchers from engineering, mathematics and physics. He was the founding director of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford.

    Professor Moin pioneered the use of direct and Large Eddy Simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, control and modelling concepts and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His current interests include: interaction of turbulent flows and shock waves, aerodynamic noise, hypersonic flows, propulsion, computational science, flow control, large eddy simulation. He is a co- Editor of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics and Associate Editor of Journal of Computational Physics, and on the editorial board of Physical Review Fluids.

  • Louie Montoya

    Louie Montoya

    Lecturer

    BioA self-proclaimed deeper learning education nerd, Louie Montoya joined the d.school in 2018 to work with educators on learning and implementing design in the classroom. Today he leads the Deeper Learning Puzzle Bus, a K12 lab mobile experiment designed to look at how “escape rooms” can change the way educators think about measurement and assessment, as well as bring more delight into the classroom.


    A first generation Mexican American raised across the western hemisphere, Louie developed an interest in other cultures that anchors his work on behalf of equitable practices in the design process. As an experience designer at the Business Innovation Factory in Rhode Island, Louie co-designed and ran the Teachers for Equity Fellowship that worked with educators across the United States to address issues of racial inequity in their schools and classrooms. As a member of the Deeper Learning network Louie focuses on building capacity around skills such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking with students.

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Pease-Ye Professor and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, including sensor interfaces, data conversion, high-speed communication, and embedded machine learning. He was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the 2008 and 2021 VLSI Circuits Symposia, as well as a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the 2008 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the 2009 Agilent Early Career Professor Award, the 2012 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award by the Humboldt Foundation, and the 2021 SIA-SRC University Researcher Award for lifetime research contributions to the U.S. semiconductor industry. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, an AdCom member and Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society (SSCS), the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), as well as the Technical Program Co-Chair of the tinyML Research Symposium. He currently serves as the chair of the IEEE SSCS Technical Committee on Open-Source Ecosystem and the General Co-Chair of the 2023 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.