School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 118 Results

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBroadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • Kim Butts Pauly

    Kim Butts Pauly

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are investigating and developing, and applying focused ultrasound in neuromodulation, blood brain barrier opening, and ablation for both neuro and body applications.

  • Daniel Palanker

    Daniel Palanker

    Director of HEPL, Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteractions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Vijay Pande

    Vijay Pande

    Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe central theme of our research is to develop and apply novel theoretical methods to understand the physical properties of biological molecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipid membranes, and small molecule therapeutics (eg protein folding or lipid vesicle fusion). As these phenomena are complex, my research employs novel theoretical and computational techniques. We apply these methods to develop novel therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    BioInterests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Peter M Pinsky

    Peter M Pinsky

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Civil Engineering

    BioPinsky works in the theory and practice of computational mechanics with a particular interest in multiphysics problems in biomechanics. His work uses the close coupling of techniques for molecular, statistical and continuum mechanics with biology, chemistry and clinical science. Areas of current interest include the mechanics of human vision (ocular mechanics) and the mechanics of hearing. Topics in the mechanics of vision include the mechanics of transparency, which investigates the mechanisms by which corneal tissue self-organizes at the molecular scale using collagen-proteoglycan-ion interactions to explain the mechanical resilience and almost perfect transparency of the tissue and to provide a theoretical framework for engineered corneal tissue replacement. At the macroscopic scale, advanced imaging data is used to create detailed models of the 3-D organization of collagen fibrils and the results used to predict outcomes of clinical techniques for improving vision as well as how diseased tissue mechanically degrades. Theories for mass transport and reaction are being developed to model metabolic processes and swelling in tissue. Current topics in the hearing research arena include multiscale modeling of hair-cell mechanics in the inner ear including physical mechanisms for the activation of mechanically-gated ion channels. Supporting research addresses the mechanics of lipid bilayer cell membranes and their interaction with the cytoskeleton. Recent past research topics include computational acoustics for exterior, multifrequency and inverse problems; and multiscale modeling of transdermal drug delivery. Professor Pinsky currently serves as Chair of the Mechanics and Computation Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford.

  • Jim Plummer

    Jim Plummer

    John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlummer studies both the physics which govern device operation in silicon integrated circuits and the technology used to fabricate these circuits. Recent work is aimed at extending silicon device structures into nanoscale dimensions.His research also explores the scaling limits of silicon technology and the application of this technology outside traditional integrated circuits.

  • Balaji Prabhakar

    Balaji Prabhakar

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioPrabhakar's research focuses on the design, analysis, and implementation of data networks: both wireline and wireless. He has been interested in designing network algorithms, problems in ad hoc wireless networks, and designing incentive mechanisms. He has a long-standing interest in stochastic network theory, information theory, algorithms, and probability theory.

  • Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Emeritus Arogyaswami Paulraj, Stanford University, is a pioneer of MIMO wireless communications, a technology break through that enables improved wireless performance. MIMO is now incorporated into all new wireless systems.

    Paulraj is the author of over 400 research papers, two text books and a co-inventor in 66 US patents.
    Paulraj has won over a dozen awards, notably the Marconi Prize and Fellowship, 2014 and the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal, 2011. He is a fellow of eight scientific / engineering national academies including the US, China, India and Sweden. He is a fellow of IEEE and AAAS.

    In 1999, Paulraj founded Iospan Wireless Inc. - which developed and established MIMO-OFDMA wireless as the core 4G technology. Iospan was acquired in by Intel Corporation in 2003. In 2004, he co-founded Beceem Communications Inc. The company became the market leader in 4G-WiMAX semiconductor and was acquired by Broadcom Corp. in 2010. In 2014 he founded Rasa Networks to develop Machine Learning tools for WiFi Networks. The company was acquired HPE in 2016.

    During his 30 years in the Indian (Navy) (1961-1991), he founded three national level laboratories in India and headed one of India’s most successful military R&D projects – APSOH sonar. He received over a dozen awards (many at the national level) in India including the Padma Bhushan, Ati Vishist Seva Medal and the VASVIK Medal.