School of Engineering


Showing 21-30 of 295 Results

  • Julia Palacios

    Julia Palacios

    Associate Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    BioDr. Palacios seek to provide statistically rigorous answers to concrete, data driven questions in evolutionary genetics and public health . My research involves probabilistic modeling of evolutionary forces and the development of computationally tractable methods that are applicable to big data problems. Past and current research relies heavily on the theory of stochastic processes, Bayesian nonparametrics and recent developments in machine learning and statistical theory for big data.

  • Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteractions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Jasmin E. Palmer

    Jasmin E. Palmer

    Ph.D. Student in Mechanical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2019

    BioJasmin earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration in Controls, Instrumentation, and Robotics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. Jasmin is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University and conducting research with faculty supervisor Professor Allison Okamura in the Collaborative Haptics in Robotics in Medicine (CHARM) Lab. Jasmin’s Ph.D. research centers around human-computer interaction and haptics, the science of and relating to the sense of touch. Developing technology that provides beneficial haptic feedback to human operators requires a multi-pronged and interdisciplinary approach. Her work leverages concepts from psychology and neuroscience to understand human perception, experimental design, and statistical analysis, and also applies her engineering background in dynamic modeling of physical systems and mechatronic system development in order to develop novel designs for wearable devices. The goal of her thesis is to develop an adaptable simulation framework that provides realistic haptic feedback for humans to perform various dexterous manipulation tasks in dynamic virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) environments using wrist-worn tactile devices. Jasmin wants to become an inspiration for other women of color to pursue careers in STEM fields. Jasmin also enjoys composing music, playing the flute, and studying foreign languages.

  • Megan J. Palmer

    Megan J. Palmer

    Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering

    BioDr. Megan J. Palmer is the Executive Director of Bio Policy & Leadership Initiatives at Stanford University. In this role, Dr. Palmer leads integrated research, teaching and engagement programs to explore how biological science and engineering is shaping our societies, and to guide innovation to serve public interests. Based in the Department of Bioengineering, where she is also an Adjunct Professor, she works closely both with groups across the university and with stakeholders in academia, government, industry and civil society around the world.

    In addition to fostering broader efforts, Dr. Palmer leads a focus area in biosecurity in partnership with the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford. Projects in this area examine how security is conceived and managed as biotechnology becomes increasingly accessible. Her current projects include assessing strategies for governing dual use research, analyzing the diffusion of safety and security norms and practices, and understanding the security implications of alternative technology design decisions.

    Dr. Palmer has created and led many programs aimed at developing and promoting best practices and policies for the responsible development of bioengineering. She currently co-chairs the World Economic Forum Global Future Council on Synthetic Biology and in a member of the Council of the Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC). For the last ten years she has led programs in safety, security and social responsibility for the international Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition, which in 2019 involved over 6000 students in 353 teams from 48 countries. She also founded and serves as Executive Director of the Synthetic Biology Leadership Excellence Accelerator Program (LEAP), an international fellowship program in biotechnology leadership. She advises and works with many other organizations on their strategies for the responsible development of bioengineering, including serving on the board of directors of Revive & Restore, a nonprofit organization advancing biotechnologies for conservation.

    Previously, Megan was a Senior Research Scholar and William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), part of FSI, where she is now an affiliated researcher. She also spent five years as Deputy Director of Policy and Practices for the multi-university NSF Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (Synberc). She has previously held positions as a project scientist at the California Center for Quantitative Bioscience at the University of California Berkeley (where she was an affiliate of Lawrence Berkeley National Labs), and a postdoctoral scholar in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University. Dr. Palmer received her Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from M.I.T. and a B.Sc.E. in Engineering Chemistry from Queen’s University, Canada.