School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 35 Results

  • Amin Saberi

    Amin Saberi

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioAmin Saberi is an Associate Professor and 3COM faculty scholar in Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. from Sharif University of Technology and his Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology in Computer Science. His research interests include algorithms, approximation algorithms, and algorithmic aspects of games, markets, and networks. Amin Saberi's research is supported by National Science Foundation (under grants CCF 0546889, 0729586, and 0915145), Library of Congress, Stanford Clean Slate Design for the Internet, and Google. His most recent awards include an Alfred Sloan Fellowship and best paper awards in FOCS 2011 and SODA 2010.

  • Ahmed Sakr

    Ahmed Sakr

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Sakr received the B.Sc. degree (with distinction) in electronics and electrical communication and M.Sc. degree in engineering physics from the Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, in 2010 and 2014, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 2018. From 2011 to 2014, he was a Teaching and Research Assistant with the Department of Engineering Physics, Cairo University. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow with the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His current research interests include the design of dual-polarized millimeterwave integrated circuits, dielectric waveguides, antennas, computational electromagnetics, slow-wave structures, and electromagnetic modelling of composite materials.

  • Krishna Saraswat

    Krishna Saraswat

    Rickey/Nielsen Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioSaraswat is working on a variety of problems related to new and innovative materials, structures, and process technology of silicon, germanium and III-V devices and interconnects for VLSI and nanoelectronics. Areas of his current interest are: new device structures to continue scaling MOS transistors, DRAMs and flash memories to nanometer regime, 3-dimentional ICs with multiple layers of heterogeneous devices, metal and optical interconnections and high efficiency and low cost solar cells.

  • Dustin Schroeder

    Dustin Schroeder

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioI am interested in the fundamental problem of observing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of ice and water in the earth system. I am particularly interested in the role that subglacial water plays in the evolution and stability of continental ice sheets and their contribution to the rate of sea level rise. I am also interested in the development, use, and analysis of geophysical radar remote sensing systems that are optimized to observe hypothesis- specific phenomena. I consider myself an instrument scientist and seek to approach problems from both an earth system science and radar system engineering perspective. By focusing on the flow of information and uncertainty through the entire process of instrument development, experimental design, data processing, analysis, and interpretation, I can draw upon a multidisciplinary set of tools to test system-scale and process-level hypotheses. For me, this deliberate combination of science and engineering is the most powerful and satisfying way to approach questions in earth and planetary science.

  • Debbie Senesky

    Debbie Senesky

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDebbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab). Her research interests include the development of nanomaterials for extreme harsh environments, high-temperature electronics, and robust instrumentation for Venus exploration. In the past, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard. She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Prof. Senesky recently chaired the 2018 Women in Aerospace Symposium (WIA2018) at Stanford University. She has served on the technical program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S). She is currently the co-editor of three technical journals: IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors, and Micromachines. In addition, she currently serves on the board of directors of the non-profit organization Scientific Adventures for Girls. In recognition of her research, she received the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org in 2018, Early Faculty Career Award from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 2012, Gabilan Faculty Fellowship Award in 2012, and Sloan Ph.D. Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2004.

    Prof. Senesky's career path and research has been featured on the People Behind the Science podcast, the Future of Everything radio show, Space.com, and NPR's Tell Me More program. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at https://xlab.stanford.edu, on Instagram (@debbiesenesky), and on Twitter (@debbiesenesky).