School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 24 Results

  • Sebastien Tilmans

    Sebastien Tilmans

    Director of Operations

    BioSebastien is the Director of Operations at the Codiga Resource Recovery Center at Stanford University, a test-bed facility dedicated to accelerating the scale-up of innovative resource recovery systems. Prior to joining Stanford, he worked in the Process Engineering group at Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. He has also designed and implemented several decentralized anaerobic wastewater treatment systems in Panama, and a waterless sanitation service in Haiti. He holds a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, and a B.E. in Civil Engineering from Cooper Union. He was a Fulbright scholar, an NDSEG fellow, and an EPA STAR fellow.

  • Fouad Tobagi

    Fouad Tobagi

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioTobagi works on network control mechanisms for handling multimedia traffic (voice, video and TCP- based applications) and on the performance assessment of networked multimedia applications using user-perceived quality measures. He also investigates the design of wireless networks, including QoS-based media access control and network resource management, as well as network architectures and infrastructures for the support of mobile users, all meeting the requirements of multimedia traffic. He also investigates the design of metropolitan and wide area networks combining optical and electronic networking technologies, including topological design, capacity provisioning, and adaptive routing.

  • Joseph D. Towles

    Joseph D. Towles

    Lecturer

    BioJoseph Towles is a Lecturer jointly appointed in the Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments at Stanford University. Joe’s teaching interests are in the areas of solid mechanics, neuromuscular biomechanics, dynamical systems and control, and engineering design. His scholarship interest is in the area of engineering education. Specifically, Joe's engineering education activities include student-centric course and curricular development; assessment of student learning & engagement; and innovation in approaches to enhance student learning.

    A Mechanical Engineer by training, Joe earned his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and his MS and PhD degrees both in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (1996-2003). Following graduate school, Joe was a research post-doctoral fellow and subsequently a research scientist and then a research assistant professor in neuromuscular biomechanics in the Sensory Motor Performance Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Northwestern University (2003-2012). Additionally, Joe was a research health scientist for the Rehabilitation R&D Service in the Department of Veterans Affairs (Hines, IL) during that time and later a scientist in the neuromuscular biomechanics lab in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2012-2014). At the time, Joe led projects that addressed the broad question of how to restore hand function (ability to grasp objects) following cervical spinal cord injury and hemiparetic stroke using experimental and computational techniques in biomechanics. As a complement to teaching within the undergraduate and graduate curricula in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2014-2018), and now teaching broadly within the undergraduate curricula of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering at Stanford, Joe's current scholarship interest has shifted to engineering education.

  • George Toye

    George Toye

    Adjunct Professor

    BioGeorge Toye, Ph.D., P.E., is adjunct professor in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    While teaching advanced project-based engineering design thinking and STEM-based innovations at the graduate level as part of ME310, he also contributes to research in varied topics in engineering education, and effective globally-distributed team collaborations. As well, he remains active in entrepreneurship and varied advising/consulting work.

    George earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley, and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with minor in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

    Since 1983, he has enjoyed volunteering annually to organize regional and state-level Mathcounts competitions to promote mathematics education amongst middle-school aged students.

  • Caroline Trippel

    Caroline Trippel

    Acting Assistant Professor, Computer Science

    BioCaroline Trippel is an Assistant Professor (starting September 2020) in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University working in the area of computer architecture. Her work focuses on promoting correctness and security as first-order computer systems design metrics (akin to performance and power). A central theme of her work is leveraging formal methods techniques to design and verify hardware systems in order to ensure that they can provide correctness and security guarantees for the applications they intend to support.

    Trippel's research has influenced the design of the RISC-V ISA memory consistency model both via her formal analysis of its draft specification and her subsequent participation in the RISC-V Memory Model Task Group. Additionally, her work produced a novel methodology and tool that synthesized two new variants of the now-famous Meltdown and Spectre attacks.

    Trippel's research has been recognized with IEEE Top Picks distinctions. She was also awarded an NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship (2017-2018) and selected to attend the 2018 MIT Rising Stars in EECS Workshop. Trippel completed her PhD in Computer Science at Princeton University and her BS in Computer Engineering at Purdue University.

  • Nick Troccoli

    Nick Troccoli

    Lecturer

    BioNick Troccoli is a Lecturer in the Stanford Computer Science Department. He started as a full-time lecturer at Stanford in Fall 2018, after graduating from Stanford in June 2018 with Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Computer Science. During his undergraduate career, he specialized in Systems, and during his graduate career he specialized in Artificial Intelligence. He was heavily involved in teaching as both an undergraduate and graduate student; he was an undergraduate Section Leader in the CS 198 Section Leading Program, a graduate CA (Course Assistant) for CS 181, the Head TA for CS 106A and CS 106B, and the summer 2017 instructor for CS 106A. In 2017 he was awarded the Forsythe Teaching Award and the Centennial TA Award for excellence in teaching.