School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 42 Results

  • Ken Waldron

    Ken Waldron

    Professor (Research) of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioKenneth J. Waldron is Professor of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at UTS. He is also Professor Emeritus from the Design Group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Stanford University. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from the University of Sydney, and PhD from Stanford. He works in machine design, and design methodology with a particular focus on robotic and mechatronic systems.

  • Todd Walter

    Todd Walter

    Sr Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh integrity satellite navigation for guiding aircraft, including satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS) and advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM).

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • Adam Wang

    Adam Wang

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioMy group develops technologies for advanced x-ray and CT imaging, including novel system design, model-based image reconstruction, spectral imaging, and radiation transport methods. I am also the Director of the Zeego Lab and the Tabletop X-Ray Lab.

    I completed my PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford under the supervision of Dr. Norbert Pelc, developing strategies for maximizing the information content of dual energy CT and photon counting detectors. I then pursued a postdoc at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Jeff Siewerdsen in Biomedical Engineering, developing reconstruction and registration methods for x-ray based image-guided surgery. Prior to returning to Stanford in 2018, I was a Senior Scientist at Varian Medical Systems, developing x-ray/CT methods for image-guided radiation therapy.

  • Bo Wang

    Bo Wang

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Developmental Biology

    BioWe are a discovery-driven research group working at the interface between statistical physics, developmental biology, and bioengineering. We combine quantitative organism-wide fluorescence imaging ("deep imaging"), functional genomics ("deep sequencing"), and statistical modeling to study systems biology and evolutionary cell biology of flatworms, including free living planarians and parasitic flukes. Using these animals, we seek to understand quantitatively the fundamental rules that control stem cell collective behavior to optimize tissue regeneration, remolding, and adaptation.

  • Ge Wang

    Ge Wang

    Associate Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGe Wang is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He specializes in the art of design and computer music — researching programming languages and interactive software design for music, interaction design, mobile music, laptop orchestras, expressive design of virtual reality, aesthetics of music technology design, and education at the intersection of computer science and music. Ge is the author of the ChucK music programming language, the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk). Ge is also the Co-founder of Smule (reaching over 200 million users), and the designer of the iPhone's Ocarina and Magic Piano. Ge is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, and the author of ARTFUL DESIGN: TECHNOLOGY IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME—a book on design and technology, art and life‚ published by Stanford University Press in 2018 (see https://artful.design/)

  • Hai Wang

    Hai Wang

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioHai Wang is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. His interests are in renewable energy conversion, catalysis and combustion. His current research focuses on theories and applications of nanoparticles and nanostructures for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, combustion simulations and nanocatalysis. He is the author and coauthor of numerous papers in scholarly journals, including "Mesoporous titania films prepared by flame stabilized on a rotating surface-Application in dye sensitized solar cells" in Journal of Physical Chemistry C, “A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames” in Combustion and Flame, “Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime” in Physical Review E, “A new mechanism for the formation of meteoritic kerogen-like material” in Science, “Gas-nanoparticle scattering: A molecular view of momentum accommodation function” in Physical Review Letters, and “Formation of nascent soot and other condensed-phase materials in flames” in Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, a highly influential energy journal published by Elsevier with an impact factor of 25.2 (2017).

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.

  • Robert Waymouth

    Robert Waymouth

    Robert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioRobert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry Robert Waymouth investigates new catalytic strategies to create useful new molecules, including sustainable polymers, synthetic fuels, and bioactive molecules. In one such breakthrough, Professor Waymouth and IBM researcher Jim Hedrick opened a new path for production of environmentally sustainable plastics and improved plastics recycling, earning recognition in the 2012 Presidential Green Chemistry Award.

    Born in 1960 in Warner Robins, Georgia, Robert Waymouth studied chemistry and mathematics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia (B.S. and B.A., respectively, both summa cum laude, 1982). He developed an interest in synthetic and mechanistic organometallic chemistry during his doctoral studies in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology under Professor R.H. Grubbs (Ph.D., 1987). His postdoctoral research with Professor Piero Pino at the Institut fur Polymere, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, focused on catalytic hydrogenation with chiral metallocene catalysts. He joined the Stanford University faculty as assistant professor in 1988, becoming full professor in 1997 and in 2000 the Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry.

    Today, the Waymouth Group applies mechanistic principles to develop new concepts in catalysis, with particular focus on the development of organometallic and organic catalysts for the synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures. In organometallic catalysis, the group devised a highly selective alcohol oxidation catalyst that selectively oxidizes unprotected polyols and carbohydrates to alpha-hyroxyketones. The Waymouth group pioneered the development of catalysts that can access multiple kinetic states during a polymerization reaction in order to control sequence distribution. They devised a novel strategy for the synthesis of elastomeric polypropylene utilizing a metallocene catalyst whose structure was designed to interconvert between chiral and achiral coordination geometries on the timescale of the synthesis of a single polymer chain.

    In collaboration with Jim Hedrick of IBM laboratories, the Waymouth Group has developed an extensive platform of organic catalysts for the controlled ring-opening polymerization of lactones, carbonates and other heterocyclic monomers. Mechanistic studies of nucleophilic N-heterocyclic carbene catalysts revealed an unusual zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization method which enabled the synthesis of high molecular weight cyclic polymers, a novel topology for these biodegradable and biocompatible macromolecules. In collaboration with the Wender group, the Waymouth group has devised selective organocatalytic strategies for the synthesis of functional degradable polymers and oligomers that function as "molecular transporters" to deliver drugs and probes into cells. These efforts combine elements of mechanistic organic and organometallic chemistry, polymer synthesis, and homogeneous catalysis to rationally design new macromolecular structures.

  • Steve Weinstein

    Steve Weinstein

    Lecturer

    BioWith a background that spans technology, product development, and entertainment, Steve Weinstein has been focused on where media meets technology. Currently Steve is the founder and CEO of MovieLabs. Steve is also the co-founder of KineTrope a small design shop for small consumer and professional electronics. Additionally, Steve is currently teaching entrepreneurship at U.C. Berkeley and at Stanford.

    Previously, Steve served as CTO of Deluxe Entertainment, a 6,000 person post production house, and CTO at Rovi Corporation where he guided the transition from physical technologies to e-commerce, connected home, secure and subscription services. Additionally, Steve held the role of Chief Technology Officer at Vicinity, a mapping company acquired by Microsoft in 2002. Steve was also a founding executive and Chief Strategist and Technologist at Liberate Technologies, an interactive television software company. Further back in his career, Steve held executive-level positions at Microprose/Spectrum HoloByte (game company), Electronics for Imaging (print processing), and Media Cybernetics (image processing). Steve also was chief architect at Ship Analytics for real time ship, sub and helicopter trainers. Steve started his career at Naval Research Laboratory in the area of advanced signal processing, computer language design, and real time os development.

  • Itschak Weissman

    Itschak Weissman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioTsachy's research focuses on Information Theory, Data Compression and Communications, Statistical Signal Processing, Machine Learning, the interplay between them, and their applications, with recent focus on applications to genomic data compression and processing. He is inventor of several patents and involved in several companies as member of the technical board. IEEE fellow, he serves on the board of governors of the information theory society as well as the editorial boards of the Transactions on Information Theory and Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory. He is founding Director of the Stanford Compression Forum.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics, machine vision, optics, scientific computing, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, display, wearable computing, and microscopy systems. Prior to joining Stanford in 2014, Prof. Wetzstein was a Research Scientist in the Camera Culture Group at MIT. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia in 2011 and graduated with Honors from the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany before that. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a Terman Fellowship, an Okawa Research Grant, the Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year 2017 Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award, and a Laval Virtual Award as well as Best Paper and Demo Awards at ICCP 2011, 2014, and 2016 and at ICIP 2016.

  • John Weyant

    John Weyant

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJohn P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) and Deputy Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth sytsems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

    Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a thirteen year old collaboratory with over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, aod the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

    Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

    Fields of Specialization:
    Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

    Interests:
    Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.