School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 264 Results

  • Ryan Michael Aronson

    Ryan Michael Aronson

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioI am a second year PhD student in the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I am mainly interested in developing numerical methods with applications to computational mechanics and fluid dynamics. I am particularly interested in high-order, structure-preserving, finite element, and isogeometric methods. Currently I am working with Professor Doug James in the area of fluid sound synthesis. Prior to coming to Stanford, I earned a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, where I worked with Professor John Evans on residual-based variational multiscale turbulence modeling and isogeometric, structure-preserving collocation methods.

  • Amel Awadelkarim

    Amel Awadelkarim

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2017

    BioMy academic background is in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Finite Element Analysis, and Continuum Mechanics with an M.S. in Engineering Science and Mechanics from Penn State University. I am becoming more and more intrigued by data analytics & applying machine learning techniques to social sciences and networks.

    Outside of academia, my interests include consuming music at all times (digitally and at live shows), competing on various Ultimate Frisbee teams (Club and National levels), cooking, and generally exploring the surrounding area.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford.

    He has published more than 100 academic papers, in interdisciplinary journals such as Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and PLoS One, as well domain-specific journals in the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for 15 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the effects of immersive media. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed five Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Peter Bailis

    Peter Bailis

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioPeter Bailis is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. Peter's research in the Future Data Systems group focuses on the design and implementation of next-generation, post-database data-intensive systems. His work spans large-scale data management, distributed protocol design, and architectures for high-volume complex decision support. He is the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a Berkeley Fellowship for Graduate Study, best-of-conference citations for research appearing in both SIGMOD and VLDB, and the CRA Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. He received a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 2015 and an A.B. from Harvard College in 2011, both in Computer Science.