School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 31 Results

  • David Cardinal

    David Cardinal

    Adjunct Lecturer, Psychology

    BioDavid is a professional photographer and technologist with a decade of experience as a digital travel and nature photographer and over two decades working in high tech, including many years in software development and management at Sun Microsystems and Amdahl, and the co-founding of FirstFloor Software, later part of Calico Commerce. He is also an Adjunct Lecturer at Stanford University, and an instructor for Psychology 221, Image Systems Engineering.

    David co-wrote one of the first image management solutions for digital photographers -- DigitalPro for Windows. His articles have appeared in dozens of magazines including many in PCMag, Dr. Dobbs, Photoshop User, and Outdoor Photographer. His photo awards include First Place in the National Wildlife Federation contest, and Finalist in the BBC / NHM Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

    David leads small group photo safaris to Africa and Alaska, which you can learn about at his homepage.

    Website: http://www.cardinalphoto.com
    Facebook: http://facebook.com/CardinalPhoto
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/DavidCardinal

  • Alexandra Carstensen

    Alexandra Carstensen

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    BioI completed my PhD in psychology at UC Berkeley and postdoctoral research at Radboud University in the Netherlands, and am currently a postdoctoral researcher working with Mike Frank in the Language and Cognition Lab at Stanford University. I'm interested broadly in how humans abstract away from the sensory information they receive about the world to create, structure, and communicate higher-level representations. To better understand these processes, my research explores the nature of category systems across languages: how these semantic structures vary, evolve, and influence thought. In a complementary line of work, I examine the role of language and culture in children's developing conceptualizations of space and relations.

  • Laura Carstensen

    Laura Carstensen

    Director, Stanford Center on Longevity and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. Professor in Public Policy

    BioLaura L. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology at Stanford University where she is the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. For more than twenty-five years her research has been supported by the National Institute on Aging and during that period she was honored with two MERIT awards. Her most current empirical research focuses on ways in which motivational changes influence cognitive processing. Dr. Carstensen is a fellow in the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association and the Gerontological Society of America. She was a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on an Aging Society and served on the National Advisory Council on Aging to National Institute on Aging. Carstensen has won numerous awards, including the Kleemeier Award, The Richard Kalish Award for Innovative Research and the Distinguished Mentorship Award from the Gerontological Society of America, as well as the Master Mentor Award from the American Psychological Association. She was selected as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2003 and in 2016 was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. In 2011, she authored A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity. Carstensen received her B.S. from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University. She holds an honorary doctorate from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.