School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 66 Results

  • J. P. Daughton

    J. P. Daughton

    Professor of History

    BioI am an historian of modern Europe and European imperialism with a particular interest in political, cultural, and social history, as well as the history of humanitarianism.

    My most recent book, In the Forest of No Joy: The Congo-Océan Railroad and the Tragedy of French Colonialism (W. W. Norton, 2021), tells the story of one of the deadliest construction projects in history. Between 1921 and 1934, French colonial interests recruited -- most often by force -- more than 100,000 men, women, and children to work on a 500-kilometer stretch of rail between Brazzaville and the Atlantic Coast. In the end, tens of thousands of Africans were dead, killed by mistreatment, starvation, and disease. The book painstakingly recounts the experiences of local communities in the face of colonial economic development, considers why the railroad witnessed such extraordinary violence and suffering, and explores the strategies defenders of the train used to justify the loss of so many African lives.

    I am also the author of An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914 (Oxford University Press, 2006), a book that tells the story of how troubled relations between Catholic missionaries and a host of republican critics shaped colonial policies, Catholic perspectives, and domestic French politics in the decades before the First World War. Based on archival research from four continents, the book challenges the long-held view that French colonizing and “civilizing” goals were the product of a distinctly secular republican ideology built on Enlightenment ideals. By exploring the experiences of religious workers, one of the largest groups of French men and women working abroad, the book argues that many “civilizing” policies were wrought in the fires of discord between missionaries and anti-clerical republicans – discord that indigenous communities exploited in responding to colonial rule. A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title, An Empire Divided was awarded the George Louis Beer Prize for the best book in international history from the American Historical Association, as well as the Alf Andrew Heggoy Book Prize from the French Colonial Historical Society.

  • Lauren Davenport

    Lauren Davenport

    Associate Professor of Political Science
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    BioLauren Davenport is an Associate Professor of Political Science. At Stanford, she is also affiliated with the Center for American Democracy; Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity; and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Her general research interests include American politics, public opinion, and race and ethnicity. In particular, her work centers around how racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. develop their identities and political attachments. Her research has appeared or is forthcoming in journals including the American Political Science Review, American Sociological Review, American Journal of Political Science, and Journal of Politics, and has been featured in national media outlets including CNN, Time magazine, NBC News, and National Public Radio. Her book, Politics Beyond Black and White (Cambridge University Press), assesses how social, historical, and economic processes help construct multiracial Americans' identities and political outlooks. She has received several awards for her research and teaching, including the International Society of Political Psychology’s David Sears Best Book Award, the 2021 Emerging Scholar Award from the Elections, Public Opinion and Voting Behavior section of the American Political Science Association, and the Stanford University Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water plays in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Giulio De Leo

    Giulio De Leo

    Professor of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a theoretical ecologist mostly interested in investigating factors and processes driving the dynamics of natural and harvested populations and on how to use this knowledge to inform practical management. I have worked broadly on life histories analysis, fishery management, dynamics and control of infectious diseases and environmental impact assessment.

  • Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee

    Barnett Family Professor, Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioThomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education (GSE), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.