School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 107 Results

  • David Eagleman

    David Eagleman

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDavid Eagleman is a neuroscientist, bestselling author, and Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Eagleman’s areas of research include sensory substitution, time perception, vision, and synesthesia. He also studies the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system, and in that capacity he directs the non-profit Center for Science and Law. Eagleman is the writer and presenter of The Brain, an Emmy-nominated television series on PBS and BBC. He is the author of 8 books, including Livewired, The Runaway Species, The Brain, Incognito, and Wednesday is Indigo Blue. He is also the author of a widely adopted textbook on cognitive neuroscience, Brain and Behavior. His internationally bestselling book of literary fiction, SUM, has been translated into 32 languages, turned into two operas, and named a Best Book of the Year by Barnes and Noble. Dr. Eagleman has been a TED speaker, a guest on the Colbert Report, and profiled in the New Yorker magazine. He has launched several neuroscience companies from his research, including Neosensory and BrainCheck.

  • Michelle María Early Capistrán

    Michelle María Early Capistrán

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Biology

    BioMichelle María Early Capistrán is a David H. Smith Conservation Fellow at the Crowder Lab. Her transdisciplinary research focuses on working collaboratively with coastal communities to improve conservation practice by integrating Local Ecological Knowledge and marine ecology. She was originally trained as a Cultural Anthropologist and holds an M.S. and PhD in Marine Science and Limnology (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM). For over a decade, she has collaborated with rural fishing communities in the Baja California peninsula to understand long-term changes in the abundance of endangered and culturally important green turtles (Chelonia mydas). She will work with Prof. Crowder, in collaboration with Jeff Seminoff of the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, to develop species distribution model for green turtles under climate change by integrating Local Ecological Knowledge and Citizen/Community Science.

  • Andrew Eberhardt

    Andrew Eberhardt

    Ph.D. Student in Physics, admitted Summer 2017

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research centers on developing numerical methods to understand problems in the intersection between astrophysics, cosmology, and quantum mechanics. Currently simulations of dark matter structure on cosmological and astrophysical scales provide competitive bounds on the dark matter mass at the lowest end. I develop methods to approximate quantum field corrections to classical field simulations of scalar field dark matter.

  • Jennifer Eberhardt

    Jennifer Eberhardt

    Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor of Public Policy, William R. Kimball Professor at the Graduate School of Business, of Psychology and by courtesy, of Law

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is on race and inequality. I am especially interested in examining race and inequality in the criminal justice context. My most recent research focuses on how the association of African Americans with crime might matter at different points in the criminal justice system and how this association can affect us in surprising ways.

  • Paulla Ebron

    Paulla Ebron

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioPaulla Ebron joined the department in 1992. Ebron is the author of Performing Africa, a work based on her research in The Gambia that traces the significance of West African praise-singers in transnational encounters. A second project focuses on tropicality and regionalism as it ties West Africa and the U.S. Georgia Sea Islands in a dialogue about landscape, memory and political uplift. This project is entitled, "Making Tropical Africa in the Georgia Sea Islands."

  • Ala Ebtekar

    Ala Ebtekar

    Lecturer

    BioAla Ebtekar is a visual artist who works in the mediums of painting, drawing, collage, alternative photography, text, ceramic, and installation.

    His work has been widely exhibited internationally and are in public and private collections such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, Devi Art Foundation in India, Orange County Museum of Art, de Young Fine Arts Museum, San Francisco International Airport, and Berkeley Art Museum among others.

    He is the founder and director of Art, Social Space and Public Discourse, a global initiative on art that investigates the multiple contexts that shift and define changing ideas of public space. This ongoing critical framework of conversations, newly issued art projects, and exploration of various cultural productions and intellectual traditions looks at recent transformations of civic life.

    He has been a lecturer at Stanford University since 2009 in the Department of Art & Art History, Institute for Diversity in the Arts, ITALIC, Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity, the Hamid & Christina Program in Iranian Studies, and Stanford Global Studies.

  • Alejandra Echeverri Ochoa

    Alejandra Echeverri Ochoa

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am an interdisciplinary conservation scientist interested in studying the social and ecological dimensions of biodiversity conservation in Latin America. I study questions related to the cultural value of biodiversity, the human footprint on ecological communities, and the policy interventions that can be done to support biodiversity conservation across Latin American ecosystems

  • Penelope Eckert

    Penelope Eckert

    Albert Ray Lang Professor, Emerita

    BioThe goal of my research is to understand the social meaning of linguistic variation. In order to do this, I pursue my sociolinguistic work in the context of in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, focusing on the relation between variation, linguistic style, social identity and social practice.

    Gender has been the big misunderstood in studies of sociolinguistic variation - in spite of the fact that some of the most exciting intellectual developments over the past decades have been in theories of gender and sexuality ... so I have been spending a good deal of time working on language and gender as well.

    Since adolescents and preadolescents are the movers and shakers in linguistic change, I concentrate on this age group, and much of my research takes place in schools. The institutional research site has made me think a good deal about learning and education, but particularly about the construction of adolescence in American society.

  • Dan Edelstein

    Dan Edelstein

    William H. Bonsall Professor of French and Professor, by courtesy, of History and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research lies in the fields of intellectual history, political thought, and digital humanities (DH). I recently published a book that explores the history of rights from the Wars of Religion to the Age of Revolutions; I'm currently working on a book that explores the intellectual history of revolution; I have a number of papers on Rousseau's political thought underway; and I continue to work on a number of DH projects.

  • Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Lecturer in French and Italian

    BioChloe Summers Edmondson is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (previously Thinking Matters). She received her PhD from Stanford in the French & Italian Department in 2020. Her research is situated at the crossroads of literary criticism, cultural history, and media studies. She specializes in 17th and 18th-century France, with a particular focus on letter-writing practices. She has also worked extensively in the field of Digital Humanities. Chloe was co-project lead on the "Salons Project" with Melanie Conroy, a project under the umbrella of "Mapping the Republic of Letters." She completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities offered through CESTA, the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Modern History, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and in the series Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. Most recently she co-edited a volume with Dan Edelstein, entitled Networks of Enlightenment: Digital Approaches to the Republic of Letters, with Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. She holds a BA with Honors in French and a MA in Communication, also from Stanford.

    Courses taught include: "Stories Everywhere," "Design that Understands Us," and "Reading the Body."