School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 49 Results

  • Avner Greif

    Avner Greif

    The Bowman Family Endowed Professor in Humanities and Sciences, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEuropean economic history: the historical development of economic institutions, their interrelations with political, social and cultural factors and their impact on economic growth.

  • Roland Greene

    Roland Greene

    Mark Pigott KBE Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioRoland Greene's research and teaching are concerned with the early modern literatures of England, Latin Europe, and the transatlantic world, and with poetry and poetics from the Renaissance to the present.

    His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). Five Words proposes an understanding of early modern culture through the changes embodied in five words or concepts over the sixteenth century: in English, blood, invention, language, resistance, and world, and their counterparts in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese.

    Other books include Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (Chicago, 1999), which follows the love poetry of the Renaissance into fresh political and colonial contexts in the New World; and Post-Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (Princeton, 1991), a transhistorical and comparative study of lyric poetics through the fortunes of the lyric sequence from Petrarch to Neruda. Greene is the editor with Elizabeth Fowler of The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, 1997). His recent essays deal with topics such as the colonial baroque, Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene and Amoretti, Sir Thomas Wyatt's poetry, and Shakespeare's The Tempest.

    Greene is editor in chief of the fourth edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, which was published in October 2012. Prepared in collaboration with the general editor Stephen Cushman and the associate editors Clare Cavanagh, Jahan Ramazani, and Paul Rouzer, this edition represents a complete revision of the most authoritative reference book on poetry and poetics.

    Greene is the founder and director of Arcade, a digital salon for literary studies and the humanities.

    In 2015-16 he served as President of the Modern Language Association, the largest scholarly organization in the world.

    At Stanford Greene is co-chair and founder of three research workshops in which most of his Ph.D. students participate. Renaissances brings together early modernists from the Bay Area to discuss work in progress, while the Poetics Workshop provides a venue for innovative scholarship in the broad field of international and historical poetics. A third research group, on Transamerican Studies, began its work in the autumn of 2009 and is now on hiatus.

    Greene has taught at Harvard and Oregon, where for six years he was chair of the Department of Comparative Literature. He has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Danforth Foundation, among others. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Linda Galvane

    Linda Galvane

    Ph.D. Student in Japanese, admitted Autumn 2012
    Student Employee, Hume Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe aim of my dissertation is to elucidate the significance of scatological representations in modern and contemporary Japanese literature, tracing their lineage in both canonical and non-canonical works from the 1930s until the post-bubble era. I focus on representations of scatology that are specifically related to sexuality -- which have been disregarded as a narrow and meaningless subset of perverse desire – as they appear in the aesthetic realm.

  • Thomas Grey

    Thomas Grey

    Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of German Studies

    BioSpecial fields: Wagner, 19th-century opera, history of musical aesthetics and criticism, Romantic music and visual culture.

    Publications: Wagner’s Musical Prose: Texts and Contexts, 1995. Editor and co-author of Richard Wagner: The Flying Dutchman, 2000, and Cambridge Companion to Wagner, forthcoming. Articles and reviews in JAMS, 19th Century Music, Music Library Association Notes, Current Musicology, Opera Quarterly, Cambridge Opera Journal, Beethoven Forum, Wagner, 19th-Century Studies; Analyzing Opera, 1989; Music Theory in the Age of Romanticism, 1996; The Arts Entwined (2000); Music and German Identity, 2001; The Don Giovanni Moment (2005); International Dictionary of Opera, Revised New Grove Dictionary, and ENO Opera Handbooks. Chapters contributed to The Wagner Compendium, 1992; The Mendelssohn Companion, 2001; Cambridge Companion to Grand Opera, 2003; Cambridge History of 19th Century Music; New History Of German Literature; and Cambridge Opera Handbooks: Tristan und Isolde, forthcoming. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Musicological Society (1999-2001).

    Editorial/advisory board: Cambridge Opera Journal, Nineteenth-Century Music Review, Wagner Spectrum.

    Grants: DAAD (1985); Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities (Fellow 1986-87); National Endowment for the Humanities (1993); Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung (2005, 1994).

    Visiting Assoc. Prof., University of California, Berkeley (2005); Visiting Asst. Professor in Music, UCLA, 1988-89.