School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 32 Results

  • Joshua Landy

    Joshua Landy

    Andrew B. Hammond Professor in French Language, Literature and Civilization, and Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of English

    BioJoshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French, Professor of Comparative Literature, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford, home to a PhD minor and undergraduate major tracks in Philosophy and Literature.

    Professor Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler). Philosophy as Fiction deals with issues of self-knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, while raising the question of what literary form contributes to an engagement with such questions; How to Do Things with Fictions explores a series of texts (by Plato, Beckett, Mallarmé, and Mark) that function as training-grounds for the mental capacities.

    Professor Landy has appeared on the NPR shows "Forum" and "Philosophy Talk" (on narrative selfhood and on the function of fiction) and has on various occasions been a guest host of Robert Harrison's "Entitled Opinions" (with Lera Boroditsky on Language and Thought, with Michael Saler on Re-Enchantment, with John Perry and Ken Taylor on the Uses of Philosophy, and with Alexander Nehamas on Beauty).

    Professor Landy has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (1999) and the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2001).

  • Daniel Lassiter

    Daniel Lassiter

    Assistant Professor of Linguistics

    BioMy research combines formal tools and experimental methods from linguistics and other areas of cognitive science to work toward a unified theory of language understanding as a cognitive phenomenon. I've worked on a variety of topics such as the semantics of modals and degree expressions, the pragmatics of vagueness and presupposition, inductive vs. deductive reasoning, and models of various pragmatic phenomena which treat language understanding as a problem of Bayesian inference. I've argued in various domains that combining logical and probabilistic models not only achieves a desirable theoretical unification but also improved empirical coverage and new theoretical insights.

  • Will Leben

    Will Leben

    Professor of Linguistics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects: collaborating with Larry M. Hyman on an overview of tone systems and working on a book on language in advertising, based on my Stanford course.

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Pamela Lee

    Pamela Lee

    Osgood Hooker Professor of Fine Arts

    BioProf. Lee received her B.A from Yale University and her Ph.D in the Department of Fine Arts from Harvard University. She also studied at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. Her area is the art, theory and criticism of late modernism with a historical focus on the 1960s and 1970s. Among other journals, her work has appeared in October, Artforum, Assemblage, Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, Les Cahiers du Musee national d'arte moderne, Grey Room, Parkett and Texte zur Kunst.

    A pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Washington D.C., a recipient of a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute and a Warhol Foundation/Creative Captal Art Writers Grant, Lee has published four books in addition to journal articles, reviews and catalogue essays. Three books have appeared with the MIT Press: Object to be Destroyed: The Work of Gordon Matta-Clark (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2000); Chronophobia: On Time in the Art of the 1960s (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2004) and Forgetting the Art World (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2012) Another book New Games: Postmodernism after Contemporary Art was published by Routledge in 2012.

    A French language edition of Object to be Destroyed will be published by Editions Macula, Paris; a Spanish language edition of Chronophobia will be released by El Centro de Documentación y Estudios Avanzados de Arte Contemporáneo (CENDEAC), Murcia, Spain.