School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 33 Results

  • Joshua Landy

    Joshua Landy

    Andrew B. Hammond Professor in French Language, Literature and Civilization, and Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of English

    BioJoshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French, Professor of Comparative Literature, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford, home to a PhD minor and undergraduate major tracks in Philosophy and Literature.

    Professor Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler). Philosophy as Fiction deals with issues of self-knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, while raising the question of what literary form contributes to an engagement with such questions; How to Do Things with Fictions explores a series of texts (by Plato, Beckett, Mallarmé, and Mark) that function as training-grounds for the mental capacities.

    Professor Landy has appeared on the NPR shows "Forum" and "Philosophy Talk" (on narrative selfhood and on the function of fiction) and has on various occasions been a guest host of Robert Harrison's "Entitled Opinions" (with Lera Boroditsky on Language and Thought, with Michael Saler on Re-Enchantment, with John Perry and Ken Taylor on the Uses of Philosophy, and with Alexander Nehamas on Beauty).

    Professor Landy has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (1999) and the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2001).

  • Daniel Lassiter

    Daniel Lassiter

    Assistant Professor of Linguistics

    BioMy research combines formal tools and experimental methods from linguistics and other areas of cognitive science to work toward a unified theory of language understanding as a cognitive phenomenon. I've worked on a variety of topics such as the semantics of modals and degree expressions, the pragmatics of vagueness and presupposition, inductive vs. deductive reasoning, and models of various pragmatic phenomena which treat language understanding as a problem of Bayesian inference. I've argued in various domains that combining logical and probabilistic models not only achieves a desirable theoretical unification but also improved empirical coverage and new theoretical insights.

  • Will Leben

    Will Leben

    Professor of Linguistics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects:
    "Advertising and the Language of Persuasion," a book for Oxford University Press based on my spring 2016-17 Stanford course

    With Brett Kessler, the third edition of "English Vocabulary Elements," also for Oxford University Press..

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Joo-Mee Lee

    Joo-Mee Lee

    Lecturer, Music

    BioD.M.A. Boston University
    M.M., New England Conservatory
    BMus., Royal Academy of Music, London/King's College

    Violinist Joo-Mee Lee has taken on several roles in the Department of Music at Stanford University since the fall of 2014. She served as director of the Stanford New Ensemble. As a Lecturer, she teaches courses on Introductory Violin and Professional Development in Music, and also gives individual lessons. She has worked closely with the Stanford Symphony and Philharmonia, and has overseen the annual Concerto Competition.

    Previously, Lee served as an artist-in-residence and violin faculty at the University of Denver and at Colorado College. She also taught at Brandeis University, and was a sought-after teacher at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School in Boston.

    A graduate of the Royal Academy of Music in London and the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Lee earned her Doctor of Musical Arts from Boston University where she was a Roman Totenberg Scholarship recipient. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled An Analytical Study of Three String Quartets of Bernard Rands.

    As a young musician, Lee was chosen to represent South Korea for the Jeunesses Musicales World Orchestra, which performed at the Berlin Philharmonie, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and Amsterdam Concertgebouw. She was a founding member of the Tonos String Quartet which won New England Conservatory’s Honor’s Quartet position. Her quartet took part in the Bank of America Celebrity Series with Rob Capilow, and performed live on Boston's WGBH radio among other concert venues throughout New England. The quartet was invited by the Joong-Ang Daily Newspaper to give a recital at Hoam Art Hall in Seoul, Korea.

    Lee has been invited to various music festivals including Aspen, Banff, and Sarasota where she performed solo and chamber recitals. While she was in graduate school, she won a position in the DaVinci Quartet and toured throughout the United States, giving concerts and masterclasses. Concurrently, she won a position in the Colorado Springs Symphony (now Philharmonic), and became a tenured member.

    As an avid new music advocate, Lee gave world premieres of chamber music and solo works by many contemporary composers. Among the composers with whom she has closely collaborated are Bernard Rands, Augusta Read Thomas, Samuel Adler, and Jennifer Higdon.