School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study human-environment interactions in land systems by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance of land use.

  • Charles Lee

    Charles Lee

    Moghadam Family Professor

    BioCharles M. C. Lee is the Moghadam Family Professor of Management and Professor of Accounting at the Graduate School of Business (GSB), Stanford University. (https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/charles-m-lee)

    Professor Lee studies the effect of human cognitive constraints on market participants and other factors that impact the efficiency with which market prices incorporate information. He has published extensively in leading academic journals in accounting, finance, and economics, on topics that include behavioral finance, financial statement analysis, market microstructure, equity valuation, quantitatve investing, and security market regulation.

    From 2004 to July 2008, Dr. Lee was Managing Director at Barclays Global Investors (BGI; now Blackrock). As Global Head of Equity Research and Co-Head of North America Active Equities, he led the firm’s world-wide active equity research team and was jointly responsible for its North American active equity business. During his tenure, BGI had over $300 billion in active equity asset under management. He joined Stanford GSB as Visiting Professor in July 2008 while continuing to serve as an exclusive senior consultant to BGI, and became a full-time faculty member in July 2009.

    Dr. Lee has received numerous honors and awards, including the Notable Contribution to Accounting Literature prize and twelve school- or national-level Teaching Excellence Awards. Most recently, he received first place in the Q Group’s 2018 Roger F. Murray Prize research competition, the 2017 Stanford GSB Distinguished Teaching Excellence Award for the MBA program, and the 2017 AAA Innovation in Financial Accounting Education Award. He has been the Presidential Scholar of the AAA, and recipient of the Stanford University Asian American Faculty Award for Outstanding Achievements and Service to the University and to the Asian American Community.

    Professor Lee has been either Editor or Associate Editor of a number of academic journals, including: The Accounting Review, the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Accounting Research, the Journal of Accounting and Economics, the Review of Accounting Studies, Management Science (Finance), and the Financial Analysts Journal.

    Professor Lee received his BMath from the University of Waterloo (1981), and his MBA (1989) and PhD (1990) from Cornell University. He has been a faculty member at the Michigan Business School (1990-95) and the Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University (1996-2004). From 1995-96 he was Visiting Economist at the New York Stock Exchange. At Cornell he held the Henrietta Johnson Louis Professorship in Management and was Director of the Parker Center for Investment Research.

    Prior to entering academic life, he spent five years in public accounting, the last three in the National Research Department of KPMG, Toronto, Canada. He holds a Certificate in Biblical Studies from Ontario Theological Seminary, and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

    (10/2018)

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Hau Lee

    Hau Lee

    Thoma Professor in the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUsing value chains to accelerate and support innovations, entrepreneurship developments using value chains to create values in developing economies; global supply chain management with digital technologies

  • Joo-Mee Lee

    Joo-Mee Lee

    Lecturer

    BioD.M.A. Boston University
    M.M., New England Conservatory
    BMus., Royal Academy of Music, London/King's College

    Violinist Joo-Mee Lee has taken on several roles in the Department of Music at Stanford University since the fall of 2014. She served as director of the Stanford New Ensemble. As a Lecturer, she teaches courses on Introductory Violin and Professional Development in Music, and also gives individual lessons. She has worked closely with the Stanford Symphony and Philharmonia, and has overseen the annual Concerto Competition.

    Previously, Lee served as an artist-in-residence and violin faculty at the University of Denver and at Colorado College. She also taught at Brandeis University, and was a sought-after teacher at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School in Boston.

    A graduate of the Royal Academy of Music in London and the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Lee earned her Doctor of Musical Arts from Boston University where she was a Roman Totenberg Scholarship recipient. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled An Analytical Study of Three String Quartets of Bernard Rands.

    As a young musician, Lee was chosen to represent South Korea for the Jeunesses Musicales World Orchestra, which performed at the Berlin Philharmonie, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and Amsterdam Concertgebouw. She was a founding member of the Tonos String Quartet which won New England Conservatory’s Honor’s Quartet position. Her quartet took part in the Bank of America Celebrity Series with Rob Capilow, and performed live on Boston's WGBH radio among other concert venues throughout New England. The quartet was invited by the Joong-Ang Daily Newspaper to give a recital at Hoam Art Hall in Seoul, Korea.

    Lee has been invited to various music festivals including Aspen, Banff, and Sarasota where she performed solo and chamber recitals. While she was in graduate school, she won a position in the DaVinci Quartet and toured throughout the United States, giving concerts and masterclasses. Concurrently, she won a position in the Colorado Springs Symphony (now Philharmonic), and became a tenured member.

    As an avid new music advocate, Lee gave world premieres of chamber music and solo works by many contemporary composers. Among the composers with whom she has closely collaborated are Bernard Rands, Augusta Read Thomas, Samuel Adler, and Jennifer Higdon.

  • Yong Suk Lee

    Yong Suk Lee

    Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioYong Suk Lee is the SK Center Fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is affiliated with the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the Center for Global Poverty and Development, and the Center for East Asian Studies.

    Lee's research is in the fields of labor economics, technology and entrepreneurship, and urban economics. His current research examines digital technology and labor, focusing on how new technologies will affect labor and how societies react to new technologies. In relation to technology and labor, Lee's research also examines various aspects of entrepreneurship, e.g., entrepreneurship and economic growth, entrepreneurship education, and factors that promote productive entrepreneurship.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Lee was an assistant professor of economics at Williams College in Massachusetts. He received his PhD in Economics from Brown University, a Master of Public Policy from Duke University, and bachelor's degree and master's degree in architecture from Seoul National University. Lee also worked as a real estate development consultant and architecture designer as he transitioned from architecture to economics.

  • Indra Levy

    Indra Levy

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioIndra Levy received her Ph.D. in modern Japanese literature from Columbia University in 2001. She is the author of Sirens of the Western Shore: the Westernesque Femme Fatale, Translation, and Vernacular Style in Modern Japanese Literature (Columbia, 2006) and editor of Translation in Modern Japan (Routledge, 2009). Her current work focuses on humor in Japanese literature, performance, and translation from the late 19th century to the mid-20th. Research interests include modern Japanese literature and criticism; critical translation studies; gender and language; modern Japanese performance, especially in the Meiji and Taishō eras; and modern Japanese women’s intellectual history..

  • Martin Lewis

    Martin Lewis

    Senior Lecturer in History

    BioMartin W. Lewis is a senior lecturer in international history at Stanford University. He graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a degree in Environmental Studies in 1979, and received a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in geography in 1987. His dissertation, and first book, examined the interplay among economic development, environmental degradation, and cultural change in the highlands of northern Luzon in the Philippines. Subsequently, he turned his attention to issues of global geography, writing (with Karen Wigen) The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography (University of California Press, 1997). He is also the co-author of a world geography textbook, Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development (Prentice Hall), and is the former associate editor of The Geographical Review. Martin W. Lewis taught at the George Washington University and then at Duke University, where he was co-director of the program in Comparative Area Studies, before coming to Stanford University in the fall of 2002. He writes on current events and issues of global geography and at GeoCurrents.info.