School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 39 Results

  • Mark Labowskie

    Mark Labowskie

    Lecturer

    BioMark Labowskie is a Jones Lecturer and former Wallace Stegner Fellow. His stories have appeared in ZYZZYVA, American Short Fiction, Subtropics, and elsewhere, and his writing has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Lighthouse Works, VCCA, and Millay Arts. In addition to fiction workshops, he teaches courses on screenwriting and queer literature. He is also the host and curator of the Stanford Storytelling Project podcast Off the Page, which spotlights the work of Stanford writers.

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment
    On Leave from 07/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study human-environment interactions in land systems by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance of land use.

  • James Landay

    James Landay

    Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanday's current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change (especially for health and sustainability), Demonstrational User Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, Cross-Cultural Interface Design, Human-Centered AI, and User Interface Design Tools. He has developed tools, techniques, and a top professional book on Web Interface Design.

  • Joshua Landy

    Joshua Landy

    Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French Language, Literature and Civilization, and Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of English

    BioJoshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French, Professor of Comparative Literature, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford, home to a PhD minor and undergraduate major tracks in Philosophy and Literature.

    Professor Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler). Philosophy as Fiction deals with issues of self-knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, while raising the question of what literary form contributes to an engagement with such questions; How to Do Things with Fictions explores a series of texts (by Plato, Beckett, Mallarmé, and Mark) that function as training-grounds for the mental capacities.

    Professor Landy has appeared on the NPR shows "Forum" and "Philosophy Talk" (on narrative selfhood and on the function of fiction) and has on various occasions been a guest host of Robert Harrison's "Entitled Opinions" (with Lera Boroditsky on Language and Thought, with Michael Saler on Re-Enchantment, with John Perry and Ken Taylor on the Uses of Philosophy, and with Alexander Nehamas on Beauty).

    Professor Landy has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (1999) and the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2001).

  • Robert Laughlin

    Robert Laughlin

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioProfessor Laughlin is a theorist with interests ranging from hard-core engineering to cosmology. He is an expert in semiconductors (Nobel Prize 1998) and has also worked on plasma and nuclear physics issues related to fusion and nuclear-pumped X-ray lasers. His technical work at the moment focuses on “correlated-electron” phenomenology – working backward from experimental properties of materials to infer the presence (or not) of new kinds of quantum self-organization. He recently proposed that all Mott insulators – including the notorious doped ones that exhibit high-temperature superconductivity – are plagued by a new kind of subsidiary order called “orbital antiferromagnetism” that is difficult to detect directly. He is also the author of A Different Universe, a lay-accessible book explaining emergent law.

  • Charles Lee

    Charles Lee

    Moghadam Family Professor, Emeritus

    BioCharles M. C. Lee is the Moghadam Family Professor, Emeritus, at the Graduate School of Business (GSB), Stanford University. (https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/charles-m-lee)

    Professor Lee studies the effect of human cognitive constraints on market participants and other factors that impact the efficiency with which market prices incorporate information. He has published extensively in leading academic journals in accounting and finance on topics that include behavioral finance, market microstructure, equity valuation, financial analysis, quantitative investing, and security market regulation.

    From 2004 to July 2008, Dr. Lee was Managing Director at Barclays Global Investors (BGI; now Blackrock). As Global Head of Equity Research and Co-Head of North America Active Equities, he led the firm’s world-wide active equity research team and was jointly responsible for its North American active equity business. During his tenure, BGI had over $300 billion in active equity asset under management. He joined Stanford GSB as Visiting Professor in July 2008 while continuing to serve as an exclusive senior consultant to BGI, and became a full-time faculty member in July 2009.

    Dr. Lee has received numerous honors, including the Notable Contribution to Accounting Literature Prize, as well as twelve school-wide or national-level Teaching Excellence Awards. Most recently, he was honored with the Harry Lyman Hooker Distinguished Visiting Professorship, McMaster University, 2021; Keynote Speaker at the JIAR Annual Conference, 2021; and the Best Paper Award, AAA Spark Conference, Western Regional, 2021. He has been the Presidential Scholar of the AAA, and recipient of the Stanford University Asian American Faculty Award for Outstanding Achievements and Service to the University and to the Asian American Community.

    Professor Lee has been Editor or Associate Editor of a number of academic journals, including: The Accounting Review, the Journal of Finance, Management Science (Finance), the Journal of Accounting and Economics, the Journal of Accounting Research, the Review of Accounting Studies, and the Financial Analysts Journal. His research has also been featured in such popular media outlets as: the Economist, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio (NPR), the LA Times, Business Week, CNBC, Forbes, Barron's, Worth, Smart Money, and Institutional Investors.

    Professor Lee received his BMath from the University of Waterloo (1981), and his MBA (1989) and PhD (1990) from Cornell University. He has been a faculty member at the Michigan Business School (1990-95) the Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University (1996-2004), and the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University (2009-2021). From 1995-96 he was Visiting Economist at the New York Stock Exchange.

    Prior to entering academic life, he spent five years in public accounting, the last three in the National Research Department of KPMG, Toronto, Canada. He holds a Certificate in Biblical Studies from Ontario Theological Seminary, and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

    8/2022

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Walter A. Haas Professor of the Humanities and Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Hau Lee

    Hau Lee

    Carl and Marilyn Thoma Professor in the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUsing value chains to accelerate and support innovations, entrepreneurship developments using value chains to create values in developing economies; global supply chain management with digital technologies

  • Joo-Mee Lee

    Joo-Mee Lee

    Academic Staff Hourly, Music

    BioD.M.A. Boston University
    M.M., New England Conservatory
    BMus., Royal Academy of Music, London/King's College

    Violinist Joo-Mee Lee has taken on several roles in the Department of Music at Stanford University since the fall of 2014. She served as director of the Stanford New Ensemble. As a Lecturer, she teaches courses on Introductory Violin and Professional Development in Music, and also gives individual lessons. She has worked closely with the Stanford Symphony and Philharmonia, and has overseen the annual Concerto Competition.

    Previously, Lee served as an artist-in-residence and violin faculty at the University of Denver and at Colorado College. She also taught at Brandeis University, and was a sought-after teacher at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School in Boston.

    A graduate of the Royal Academy of Music in London and the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Lee earned her Doctor of Musical Arts from Boston University where she was a Roman Totenberg Scholarship recipient. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled An Analytical Study of Three String Quartets of Bernard Rands.

    As a young musician, Lee was chosen to represent South Korea for the Jeunesses Musicales World Orchestra, which performed at the Berlin Philharmonie, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and Amsterdam Concertgebouw. She was a founding member of the Tonos String Quartet which won New England Conservatory’s Honor’s Quartet position. Her quartet took part in the Bank of America Celebrity Series with Rob Capilow, and performed live on Boston's WGBH radio among other concert venues throughout New England. The quartet was invited by the Joong-Ang Daily Newspaper to give a recital at Hoam Art Hall in Seoul, Korea.

    Lee has been invited to various music festivals including Aspen, Banff, and Sarasota where she performed solo and chamber recitals. While she was in graduate school, she won a position in the DaVinci Quartet and toured throughout the United States, giving concerts and masterclasses. Concurrently, she won a position in the Colorado Springs Symphony (now Philharmonic), and became a tenured member.

    As an avid new music advocate, Lee gave world premieres of chamber music and solo works by many contemporary composers. Among the composers with whom she has closely collaborated are Bernard Rands, Augusta Read Thomas, Samuel Adler, and Jennifer Higdon.

  • Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Ph.D

    Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Ph.D

    Sr Research Scholar, Pediatrics - Center for Biomedical Ethics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lee is a medical anthropologist whose research focuses on the sociocultural dimensions and ethical issues of emerging technologies and their translation into clinical practice. Dr. Lee leads studies on the public understandings of research using clinical data and biological samples, concepts of race, culture and human genetic variation, and citizen science, commercialization of biotechnology and entrepreneurship.

  • Victor R. Lee

    Victor R. Lee

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsquantified self, self-tracking, wearable technology, maker education, conceptual change in science, elementary computer science education

  • Yong Suk Lee

    Yong Suk Lee

    BioYong Suk Lee is the SK Center Fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is affiliated with the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the Center for Global Poverty and Development, and the Center for East Asian Studies.

    Lee's research is in the fields of labor economics, technology and entrepreneurship, and urban economics. His current research examines digital technology and labor, focusing on how new technologies will affect labor and how societies react to new technologies. In relation to technology and labor, Lee's research also examines various aspects of entrepreneurship, e.g., entrepreneurship and economic growth, entrepreneurship education, and factors that promote productive entrepreneurship.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Lee was an assistant professor of economics at Williams College in Massachusetts. He received his PhD in Economics from Brown University, a Master of Public Policy from Duke University, and bachelor's degree and master's degree in architecture from Seoul National University. Lee also worked as a real estate development consultant and architecture designer as he transitioned from architecture to economics.

  • Mark Lemley

    Mark Lemley

    William Neukom Professor of Law and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsintellectual property, Internet, and antitrust law; law and AI/robotics

  • Michael Lepech

    Michael Lepech

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioUnsustainable energy and material consumption, waste production, and emissions are some of today’s most pressing global concerns. To address these concerns, civil engineers are now designing facilities that, for example, passively generate power, reuse waste, and are carbon neutral. These designs are based foremost on longstanding engineering theory. Yet woven within this basic knowledge must be new science and new technologies, which advance the field of civil engineering to the forefront of sustainability-focused design.

    My research develops fundamental engineering design concepts, models, and tools that are tightly integrated with quantitative sustainability assessment and service life modeling across length scales, from material scales to system scales, and throughout the early design, project engineering, construction, and operation life cycle phases of constructed facilities. My research follows the Sustainable Integrated Materials, Structures, Systems (SIMSS) framework. SIMSS is a tool to guide the multi-scale design of sustainable built environments, including multi-physics modeling informed by infrastructure sensing data and computational learning and feedback algorithms to support advanced digital-twinning of engineered systems. Thus, my research applies SIMMS through two complementary research thrusts; (1) developing high-fidelity quantitative sustainability assessment methods that enable civil engineers to quickly and probabilistically measure sustainability indicators, and (2) creating multi-scale, fundamental engineering tools that integrate with sustainability assessment and facilitate setting and meeting sustainability targets throughout the life cycle of constructed facilities.

    Most recently, my research forms the foundation of the newly created Stanford Center at the Incheon Global Campus (SCIGC) in South Korea, a university-wide research center examining the potential for smart city technologies to enhance the sustainability of urban areas. Located in the smart city of Songdo, Incheon, South Korea, SCIGC is a unique global platform to (i) advance research on the multi-scale design, construction, and operation of sustainable built environments, (ii) demonstrate to cities worldwide the scalable opportunities for new urban technologies (e.g., dense urban sensing networks, dynamic traffic management, autonomous vehicles), and (iii) improve the sustainability and innovative capacity of increasingly smarter cities globally.

    With an engineering background in civil and environmental engineering and material science (BSE, MSE, PhD), and business training in strategy and finance (MBA), I continue to explore to the intersection of entrepreneurship education, innovation capital training, and the potential of startups to more rapidly transfer and scale technologies to solve some of the world's most challenging problems.

  • Pavle Levi

    Pavle Levi

    Osgood Hooker Professor of Fine Arts

    BioPavle Levi is Associate Professor in the Art Department's Film and Media Studies Program.

    He is also Faculty Director of Stanford's Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (CREEES).

    Prof. Levi's primary areas of research and teaching include: European cinema (emphasis on Eastern Europe), aesthetics and ideology, film and media theory, experimental cinema, intersections of theory and practice.

    He is the recipient of the 2011 Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching.