School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 132 Results

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology

  • Chris Chafe

    Chris Chafe

    Duca Family Professor

    BioChris Chafe is a composer, improvisor and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent works include Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China, Phasor for contrabass and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland. Chafe premiered DiPietro's concerto, Finale, for electric cello and orchestra in 2012.

  • Julius Smith

    Julius Smith

    Professor of Music, and by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioSmith is a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering (Information Systems Lab) based at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Teaching and research pertain to music and audio applications of signal processing. Former software engineer at NeXT Computer, Inc., responsible for signal processing software pertaining to music and audio. For more, see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/.

  • Ge Wang

    Ge Wang

    Associate Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGe Wang is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He specializes in the art of design and computer music — researching programming languages and interactive software design for music, interaction design, mobile music, laptop orchestras, expressive design of virtual reality, aesthetics of music technology design, and education at the intersection of computer science and music. Ge is the author of the ChucK music programming language, the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk). Ge is also the Co-founder of Smule (reaching over 200 million users), and the designer of the iPhone's Ocarina and Magic Piano. Ge is the recipient of a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship, and is writing a book on design, art, and technology, to be published by Stanford University Press.

  • Karol Berger

    Karol Berger

    Osgood Hooker Professor in Fine Arts and Professor, by courtesy, of German Studies

    BioKarol Berger (Ph.D. Yale 1975) is the Osgood Hooker Professor in Fine Arts at the Department of Music, as well as an affiliated faculty at the Department of German Studies, and an affiliated researcher at the Europe Center. A native of Poland, he has lived in the U.S. since 1968 and taught at Stanford since 1982. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study and Conference Center, and Stanford Humanities Center. In 2011-12 he has been the EURIAS Senior Fellow at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna. In 2005-2006, he was the Robert Lehman Visiting Professor at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. He is a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, an honorary member of the American Musicological Society, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His Musica Ficta received the 1988 Otto Kinkeldey Award of the American Musicological Society, and his Bach's Cycle, Mozart's Arrow the 2008 Marjorie Weston Emerson Award of the Mozart Society of America. In 2011 he received the Glarean Prize from the Swiss Musicological Society and in 2014 the Humboldt Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  • Stephen Sano

    Stephen Sano

    Professor Harold C. Schmidt Director in Choral Studies and Professor (Teaching) of Music

    BioDirector, Stanford Chamber Chorale and Stanford Symphonic Chorus. Nationally and internationally invited master class teacher in conducting and choral music, guest conductor and adjudicator in choral music; has conducted master classes and performances with festival, honor, and collegiate choirs, orchestras, and other instrumental ensembles from over 20 states as well as from England, Germany, Austria, Australia, Canada, and Japan.

    Special fields: Viennese Chorwalzer, Hawaiian choral music, music of Queen Lili'uokalani, kī hō'alu (Hawaiian slack key guitar), North American Taiko (Japanese American drumming).

    Studies at Tanglewood Music Center and with Mitchell Sardou Klein, William Ramsey, Aiko Onishi, Alfred Kanwischer, Fernando Valenti, Ozzie Kotani. Harpsichordist, International Chamber Orchestra of Rome.

    Former conducting faculty, Wilkes University Encore Music Festival of Pennsylvania.

    Recordings: Arsis Audio (Choral), Pictoria Records (choral) and DHC (choral and kī hō'alu), Argus (kī hō'alu), Ward Recors (kī hō'alu), Verita Note (kī hō'alu). Grammy preliminary ballot (choral). Grammy preliminary ballot (Hawaiian), Hawaiian Music Award finalist, Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award finalist (kī hō'alu).

  • Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied composition with Paolo Ugoletti, Glenn Glasow, Wayne Peterson, and Jody Rockmaker.

    Numerous compositions, including songs for voice and various combinations of instruments, several orchestral, choral and band pieces, string quartets, and the operas La povertà, Lot’s Women, and Oxford Companions.

    Recipient of the Walter J. Gores award for excellence in teaching (2003-04), Stanford's highest award.