School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-26 of 26 Results

  • Jacob Abolafia

    Jacob Abolafia

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI am a political theorist who writes on the history of political thought and critical theory, broadly construed.

    My dissertation (Harvard, 2019) “Penal Modernism before Modernity: Correction and Confinement in the History of Political Thought”, traced the treatment of the prison in political philosophy from Plato’s Athens to Jeremy Bentham’s London, with an eye towards our present carceral dysfunction. In addition to finishing a related manuscript on incarceration and the history of political thought, I am also engaged in research projects on political myths and political economy, as well as contemporary theories of rationality and society.

    I have published and taught on the history of political thought from classical antiquity to the present day. My ongoing research interests include social and political philosophy from early modernity through the critical theorists, Jewish and Islamic political thought, classical philosophy, and the intersection of social and political theory.

    After receiving my doctorate from Harvard’s Government Department, I was the 2019-2020 Harvard-Tel Aviv Post-doctoral Fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Tel Aviv University. And, as of 2020, a Post-doctoral Fellow at the Van Leer Institute’s Polonsky Academy in Jerusalem. I am currently a Post-doctoral Fellow at the Stanford Civics Initiative, based in the Political Science Department at Stanford University.

    I hold a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy from Yale University (2010), and completed M.Phils in Political Thought and Intellectual History (2011) and Ancient Philosophy (2012) at Cambridge, where I was a Paul Mellon Fellow at Clare College until 2013.

    I live in San Francisco.

  • Gil Baram

    Gil Baram

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on governmental decision-making during cyberattacks and strategic attribution-related policy. I work at the intersection of Cyber and International Relations, examining under what circumstances governments choose public acknowledgment of attacks or secrecy. Within my doctoral research, I developed a pioneering analytical model that allows decision-makers to predict their adversary’s response, supported by an original coded database of cyberattacks.

    My research interests encompass various aspects of cyber warfare and covert actions, including the impact of technology on national security, cyber and national security, the role of Intelligence agencies in cyberattacks, cyber threats to space systems, and how states act during cyberconflict.

  • Guzel Garifullina

    Guzel Garifullina

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioGuzel Garifullina is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (AY 2022-2023). Her research interests include comparative political behavior and authoritarian governance with a focus on Russia. Her previous projects use a variety of methods, including lab and survey experiments, as well as the analysis of open biographical data on public officials and local-level governance indicators. She earned her PhD in Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2021.

  • Dongxian Jiang

    Dongxian Jiang

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDongxian Jiang's primary research interests lie in comparative and international political theory, the history of political thought, and pressing practical questions of democratic and international politics, including Western and non-Western perspectives on human rights, good governance, political legitimacy, and cross-cultural dialogue.

  • Javier Mejia

    Javier Mejia

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioJavier Mejia is an economist whose work focuses on the intersection between social networks and economic history. His interests extend to topics on entrepreneurship and political economy with a geographical specialty in Latin America and the Middle East. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Los Andes University. He has been a Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer at New York University--Abu Dhabi and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Bordeaux.

    Most of Javier’s research explores how social interactions have shaped the economy in the long term. He brings together theoretical and empirical methods from economics and conceptual tools from anthropology to the study of history. This has led him to explore an extensive set of historical objects. He has studied entrepreneurs in Colombia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, industrial elites in Morocco in the late 20th century, tribal societies in North Africa in the 19th century, early Muslim communities in the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula between the 7th and 9th centuries, and political elites in Colombia and the US in the early 19th century.

    Javier has teaching experience in multicultural environments, having taught at universities in Latin America, the United States, and the Middle East. He has taught courses on economic growth, economic history, and economic theory. At Stanford, he offers two courses that jointly provide an overview of economic evolution from a global-history and moral-philosophy perspective. On the one hand, Wealth of Nations studies the origins of economic development, the moral dilemmas underneath the development process, and the path that led to the configuration of the modern global economy. On the other hand, Societal Collapse studies the causes of economic decline, the social and political consequences of that decline, and the path that led to the disappearance of some of the most prosperous societies in human history.

    Javier is a regular contributor to different news outlets. Currently, he is a Forbes Magazine op-ed columnist.

  • J. Luis Rodriguez

    J. Luis Rodriguez

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI have a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Johns Hopkins University. My research centers on how developing countries build and maintain limits on the use of force in international law. I focus on the origins of the nuclear order primarily from a Latin American perspective. My work reconstructs the attempts of the Brazilian and Mexican governments to delegitimize the threat and use of nuclear force while securing access to peaceful nuclear technologies. By analyzing the Latin American participation in the crafting of nuclear weapon nonproliferation treaties, I aim to understand how developing countries react when technological advancements challenge existing limits on the use of force.

    I served as a Nuclear Security Fellow with the Fundação Getulio Vargas in São Paulo, Brazil. Before joining the Ph.D. program at Hopkins, I was a junior advisor to the Mexican Vice-Minister for Latin American Affairs, working on international security cooperation in the region.

  • Lauren Sukin

    Lauren Sukin

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI am a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University.

    In my research, I examine issues of international security, focusing on the role of nuclear weapons in international politics. Specifically, I am interested in analyzing how nuclear states communicate credibility and enforce commitments in three contexts: 1) demonstrations of resolve, 2) crisis escalation, and 3) nuclear nonproliferation. My dissertation studies demonstrations of resolve in the context of U.S. extended deterrence on the Korean Peninsula. While most previous work in the nuclear policy realm has been limited by studying very few cases at the state level, I use large-N survey experiments, computational text analysis of archival sources, and tools for small-N causal inference to gain new insights on these topics. I couple these methods with detailed case studies and other qualitative approaches. My research agenda explores the dynamics of nuclear weapons, crisis politics, and conflict studies. In particular, I am interested in continuing to study these subjects in relation to pressing issues in contemporary U.S. foreign policy.

    I graduated from Brown University in 2016 with B.A.s in Political Science and Literary Arts.

    As an advisor for FLI (first-generation/low-income) students and a queer woman, I welcome opportunities to discuss applying to Stanford's PhD programs in Political Science with diverse prospective students. Please feel free to reach out via email with "Prospective Student" as the subject line if you have any questions.

  • Alessandro Vecchiato

    Alessandro Vecchiato

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioAlessandro Vecchiato is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Program for Democracy and the Internet at Stanford. He received his Ph.D. in Politics from New York University in 2019 with a dissertation on the impact of new media and technology on political outcomes, such as voters preferences, political participation and news consumption, and more broadly their impact on civil society. His postdoc fellowship project includes a number of studies aimed at understanding how to better design internet media, including social media and mobile communication app, to foster civil public dialogue and fight misinformation. His doctoral research has already used a custom-developed app, Dossier, to experiment on the best modalities to deliver new, and especially, to test the consequences of algorithmic biases online. During his postdoctoral time at Stanford, he plans to expand on this body of work to detect strategies and develop technological tools that citizens can use to receive more accurate and balanced news diets.