Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 26 Results

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Lay Teng Ang

    Lay Teng Ang

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    BioAs a stem cell biologist, my overall goal is to understand the mechanisms through which stem cells differentiate into progressively-specialized cell-types and to harness this knowledge to artificially generate pure populations of desired cell-types from stem cells. My work over the past 10 years has centered on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, which include embryonic and pluripotent stem cells), which have the remarkable ability to generate any of the hundreds of diverse cell-types in the body. However, it has been notoriously difficult to guide PSCs to differentiate into a pure population of a given cell-type. Current differentiation strategies typically generate heterogeneous cell populations unsuitable for basic research or clinical applications. To address this challenge, I mapped the cascade of branching lineage choices through which PSCs differentiate into a variety of endodermal and mesodermal cell-types. I then developed effective methods to differentiate PSCs into specific lineages by providing the extracellular signal(s) that specify a given lineage while inhibiting the signals that induce the alternate fate(s), enabling the generation of highly-pure human heart, bone (Loh & Chen et al., 2016; Cell) and liver (Loh & Ang et al., 2014; Cell Stem Cell) from PSCs. In particular, I have focused on generating pure populations of liver progenitors from PSCs; these PSC-derived human liver progenitors regenerated human liver tissue, and improved the survival of, mouse models of liver failure (Ang et al., 2018; Cell Reports). My goal is to complete the preclinical development of PSC-derived liver progenitors as a potential cellular replacement therapy for liver failure. This project will be facilitated by my experience with PSC differentiation, assays of liver cell identity and function, and mouse models of liver failure.

    I earned my Ph.D. jointly from the University of Cambridge and A*STAR and was subsequently appointed as a Research Fellow, and later, a Senior Research Fellow, at the Genome Institute of Singapore. At Singapore, I was an independent group leader and received extramural funding support as PI or co-PI on three government grants. In April 2018, I moved my laboratory to Stanford University as a Siebel Investigator and Instructor at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. My laboratory is supported by the Siebel Investigatorship and two grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Urology, of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor in Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the cellular and molecular events that regulate proper development of the lungs, including how the gas exchange region is maintained and renewed throughout life. We apply this knowledge to dissect how dysregulation of these normal processes can cause or contribute to specific lung diseases like pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer, and we are interested in uncovering how lung stem cells are regulated in the hopes of harnessing them as a regenerative therapy for patients.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

  • Michael Longaker

    Michael Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for human hematopoietic cells.