School of Medicine


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  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTelomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Vice Dean of the School of Medicine and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of expression of oncogenes in normal and malignant hematologic cells.

  • Rondeep Brar

    Rondeep Brar

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioAs the Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center and Associate Director for Clinical Care at the Stanford Cancer Institute, it is my privilege to partner with my colleagues in advancing innovative research alongside high quality, coordinated, and compassionate care.

    I aim to provide high quality care in a diverse patient practice. My clinic includes all types of hematologic disorders, ranging from anemia, clotting/bleeding disorders, and low blood counts to complex malignancies such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloma, and lymphoma. I aim to combine the efficiency of a private office with the complex care expected of a tertiary institution like Stanford. I value your time and strive to maintain an on-schedule clinic.

  • Robert Diep, MD

    Robert Diep, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Diep is a board-certified, fellowship-trained hematologist with Stanford’s Hematology Program and Hematologic Cancer Program. He is also a clinical assistant professor with the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology.

    He diagnoses and treats patients with a wide range of nonmalignant hematology conditions. His special interests include clotting disorders, bleeding disorders, hemoglobinopathies, and disorders affecting blood count. Subspecialty interests include anticoagulation and thrombosis.

    Dr. Diep’s practice style emphasizes shared decision-making by building patient-physician relationships and using the best available evidence to create treatment plans. He is passionate about improving care for patients with blood disorders and has helped expand access to hematology care by launching an electronic consult service for primary care providers.

    Dr. Diep’s research interests include anticoagulation, thrombosis, and bleeding disorders. He has participated in research projects that have received funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Dr. Diep has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals, and has presented to his peers at national and regional meetings.

    He is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society, International Society of Hemostasis and Thrombosis, and Anticoagulation Forum. Dr. Diep serves as quality director for the Division of Hematology.

  • Tamara Dunn

    Tamara Dunn

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Tamara Dunn is a clinical associate professor in the Division of Hematology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is a clinician with a special interest in medical education, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Specifically, she is committed to improving workforce diversity and creating inclusive workplaces. She is currently the Program Director for the Stanford Hematology/Oncology Fellowship and one of the Associate Chairs of Diversity and Inclusion for the Department of Medicine at Stanford. She is a member of the inaugural American Society of Hematology (ASH) Ambassador Cohort and serves on the ASH Women in Hematology committee, which she co-chairs. She is on the steering committee and is a mentor for Stanford’s Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity (LEAD) program. She takes pride in treating underserved veterans at the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, where she sees both classical and malignant hematology. Outside of medicine she enjoys singing, dancing, sports (Go Chiefs! Go Warriors!), board games, movies, and spending time with friends and family including her 3 young children, spouse, and energetic vizsla Casey.