School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 20 Results

  • Christopher O. Barnes

    Christopher O. Barnes

    Assistant Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in our lab is aimed at defining the structural correlates of broad and potent antibody-mediated neutralization of viruses. We combine biophysical and structural methods (e.g., cryo-EM), protein engineering, and in vivo approaches to understand how enveloped viruses infect host cells and elicit antigen-specific immune responses. We are particularly interested in the co-evolution of HIV-1 and broadly-neutralizing IgG antibodies (bNAbs), which may hold the key to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. In addition, we are investigating antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 and related zoonotic coronaviruses (CoV), with the related goal of developing broadly-protective immunotherapies and vaccines against variants of concern and emerging CoV threats.

    HIV-1; SARS-CoV-2; coronaviruses; cryo-EM; crystallography; vaccines; directed evolution

  • Andrew Beel

    Andrew Beel

    Instructor, Structural Biology

    BioAndrew Beel received an M.D. and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Stanford, where he studied the structure and condensation of the eukaryotic chromosome under the supervision of Roger Kornberg. He started his independent research program in late 2022 after receiving an Early Independence Award from the Office of the Director of the National Institutes of Health. His group is broadly interested in mesoscale biological organization and the physical underpinnings thereof, with a current emphasis on the axial core of the metaphase chromosome. The Beel lab is actively recruiting new members at all stages of training; interested parties are encouraged to apply (please direct inquiries to beelaj@stanford.edu).

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Patricia Cross

    Patricia Cross

    Professor (Teaching) of Structural Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am not now actively involved in research, but my past endeavors remain central to my position in guiding medical students in their scholarship pursuits.
    The cited publications represent three areas of interest:
    (1) medical student research (Jacobs and Cross)
    (2) women in medicine (Cross and Steward)
    (3) the reproductive physiology of early development (Cross and Brinster)
    Only one publication is listed in this area since the research is not current, but others (in e.g. Nature, DevBiol, ExpCellRes) give a broader picture of my pursuit when at the University of Pennsylvania.

  • Adam de la Zerda

    Adam de la Zerda

    Associate Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular imaging technologies for studying cancer biology in vivo

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Ted┬áJardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Roger Kornberg

    Roger Kornberg

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the regulation of transcription, the first step in gene expression. The main lines of our work are 1) reconstitution of the process with more than 50 pure proteins and mechanistic analysis, 2) structure determination of the 50 protein complex at atomic resolution, and 3) studies of chromatin remodelling, required for transcription of the DNA template in living cells

  • Michael Levitt

    Michael Levitt

    Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor of Cancer Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStanford Professor of Biophysics and Computational Biology, Cambridge PhD and DSc, 2013 Chemistry Nobel Laureate (complex systems), FRS & US National Academy member, I code well for my age.