School of Medicine


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  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Richard Baron, MD

    Richard Baron, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Baron is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic and the Vestibular Balance Disorders Program. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received fellowship training in both headache medicine and otoneurology (dizziness and vestibular disorders) at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating the many causes of headache, facial pain, and dizziness. To provide the highest level of care, he takes a detailed history, performs a specialized physical exam, and collaborates with colleagues across the Stanford Health Care system. Dr. Baron develops a comprehensive care plan customized for each patient. He specializes in non-medication options, nerve blocks and other advanced treatments, Botox® injections, and the latest headache medications and devices.

    Dr. Baron has a particular interest in the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), which results from pressure around the brain and causes headaches and problems with vision. He has established a multidisciplinary group of Stanford Health Care doctors to improve and coordinate care for people with IIH. The group includes doctors from several departments, including neuro-ophthalmology, neurosurgery, interventional radiology, and bariatric surgery and medical weight loss. They work together to determine the most effective medical and procedural treatments.

    Dr. Baron also has a strong interest in the evaluation of acute vestibular syndromes and the management of dizziness in the emergency room. He has published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, and Translational Behavioral Medicine. He has also written several chapters for the Stanford Neurology Resident Handbook. He has presented his research at conferences throughout the United States, and he is heavily involved with quality improvement projects and educating resident physicians.

    Dr. Baron is a member of the American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, Catholic Medical Association, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.