School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 35 Results

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli received his B.Sc. degree in Physics (McGill, 1980), and M.A.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Sciences (Toronto, 1983, 1987). He joined Stanford University in 1987 and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director of the Engineering Physics Program. He carries out research in applied plasma physics with applications to a broad range of fields, including space propulsion, aerodynamics, medicine, materials synthesis, and fusion.

  • Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are committed to promoting an understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and ensuring that all patients who are suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks receive appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this devastating, chronic, and fixable condition. We believe this can be best accomplished in a multidisciplinary setting involving expertise in radiology, neurology, and interventional pain medicine.

  • Chris Cartwright, MD

    Chris Cartwright, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of intestinal cell growth control; function and regulation of the Src family of tyrosine kinases in normal cells, and their deregulation in cancer cells.

  • Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is on the translational application of next-generation sequencing technologies to breast cancer care: (1) the value of hereditary cancer genetic panel testing in clinical practice, (2) the mechanisms by which inherited genetic variants lead to breast cancer development, and (3) the analysis of somatic tumor sequencing data to inform understanding of breast tumorigenesis, metastasis, and development of resistance in response to therapeutics.

  • Alma-Martina Cepika

    Alma-Martina Cepika

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioDr. Cepika is an immunologist with an extensive background in translational research, autoimmunity, autoinflammation, and human systems immunology. Her goal is to understand the mechanisms governing immunological tolerance, and to leverage this knowledge to cure currently incurable diseases.

    Dr. Cepika received her MD degree and a PhD in Immunology from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine in Croatia. There, she focused on the immunomonitoring of patients with lupus, identifying how circulating DNA levels changed with therapy. Subsequently, she joined the lab of Dr. Virginia Pascual at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pascual had previously discovered that IL-1beta is a key pathogenic player in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), but the immune alterations contributing to IL-1beta-mediated inflammation remained unknown. To address this, Dr. Cepika developed a 3D in vitro stimulation assay to evaluate immune responses of blood leukocytes of pediatric sJIA patients. In combination with integrated bioinformatics analysis, this approach identified aberrant cellular responses, transcriptional pathways and genes that shed new light on immune dysregulation in sJIA. This assay (tollgene.org) can be further applied to dissect underlying immunopathogenic mechanisms in many human disorders.

    Currently, Dr. Cepika is an Instructor in the Pediatric Division of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. There, she is working to uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms that govern the differentiation and function of antigen-inducible regulatory T cells called type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, and use this knowledge to design Tr1 cell-based therapies to improve the outcomes of patients with cancer, autoimmunity, or receiving allogeneic cell or organ transplants.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal and squamous cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research, Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Michelle M. Chen, MD, MHS

    Michelle M. Chen, MD, MHS

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    BioDr. Chen is a fellowship-trained head and neck surgical oncologist with a board certification in otolaryngology and an assistant professor with the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology.

    Her practice focuses on the treatment of cancers that affect the head and neck. She has received additional training in microvascular reconstruction and transoral robotic surgery.

    Dr. Chen has an active lab involved in head and neck cancer health services research and her work has appeared in numerous journals, including The Journal of the American Medical Association, Cancer, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and Journal of Clinical Oncology. She has also authored chapters in textbooks on head and neck cancer treatment.

    Dr. Chen is a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery (AAOHNS) and the American Head & Neck Society.

  • Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Athena Cherry

    Athena Cherry

    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe use of molecular and molecular cytogenetic methods to identify chromosomal abnormalities in acquired and congenital disorders.

  • Ramsey Cheung

    Ramsey Cheung

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Cheung's research interests focus on liver diseases, with emphasis on viral hepatitis. His past research include investigating the mechanism of viral neutralization of hepatitis B virus at the molecular level and immune response to hepatitis C virus. Dr. Cheung is studing various aspects of hepatitis C, both clinical and translational research.

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsContribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical researcher interested in evaluating promising new diagnostic paradigms and treatments for serious or poorly treated, chronic skin conditions. My research currently includes:

    Therapeutics:

    - Treatments for itch from epidermolysis bullosa

    - Treatments for chronic wounds for patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (In collaboration with Dr. Jean Tang and Dr. Peter Marinkovich)

    - Treatments for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin conditions

    Diagnostics:

    - Artificial intelligence approaches for melanoma and skin cancer early detection

    - Imaging mass spectrometry for skin cancer margin analysis and diagnosis

    I collaborate with other faculty within the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG) to conduct investigator initiated and sponsored clinical trials seeking to improve care for important dermatologic diseases

    Please learn more about our work at: https://siirg.stanford.edu/

  • Gheorghe Chistol

    Gheorghe Chistol

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in my laboratory is aimed at understanding how eukaryotes replicate their DNA despite numerous challenges (collectively known as replication stress), and more generally – how eukaryotic cells safeguard genome integrity. Specifically, we are investigating: (i) mechanisms that regulate the activity of the replicative helicase during replication stress, (ii) mechanisms that control the inheritance of epigenetic information during replication, and (iii) mechanisms of ubiquitin-mediated regulation of genome maintenance. We utilize single-molecule microscopy to directly image fluorescently-labeled replication factors and track them in real time in Xenopus egg extracts. I developed this system as a postdoctoral fellow, and used it to monitor how the eukaryotic replicative helicase copes with DNA damage. We plan to further extend the capabilities of this platform to directly visualize other essential replication factors, nucleosomes, and regulatory post-translational modifications like ubiquitin chains. By elucidating molecular mechanisms responsible for maintaining genome stability, we aim to better understand the link between genome instability and cancer, and how these mechanisms can be harnessed to improve disease treatment.

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    BioDr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAfter shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Katrin Chua

    Katrin Chua

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism)
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is interested in understanding molecular processes that underlie aging and age-associated pathologies in mammals. We focus on a family of genes, the SIRTs, which regulate stress resistance and lifespan in lower organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, we recently uncovered a number of ways in which SIRT factors may contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating resistance to various forms of stress. We have now begun to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these SIRT factors function. In particular, we are interested in how SIRT factors regulate chromatin, the molecular structure in which the DNA of mammalian genomes is packaged, and how such functions may link genome maintenance to stress resistance and aging.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.