School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 180 Results

  • Peter D'Souza

    Peter D'Souza

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. D'Souza's clinical practice is in Emergency Medicine at Stanford Hospital. He has a strong interest in Emergency Medical Services and pre-hospital care. He currently serves as medical advisor for the Palo Alto Fire Department, Mountain View Fire Department, and Santa Clara Fire Department. He serves as the Department Liaison to the Trauma Service. He previously served as Medical Director for Stanford Life Flight and course director for the Stanford EMT Training Program. His research interests include treatment of neurological emergencies and variability in trauma care.

  • Saurabh Dahiya, MD, FACP

    Saurabh Dahiya, MD, FACP

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Dahiya is a cancer specialist with board certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine the Clinical Director of the Cancer Cell Therapy.

    Dr. Dahiya strives to support each patient with a personalized and compassionate care plan that optimizes healing and quality of life.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Dahiya was an associate professor of medicine at the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he developed the Cellular Immunotherapy Program and served as the Director of Cellular Immunotherapy in leukemia and lymphoma.

    Dr. Dahiya’s research focuses on cellular immunotherapy for hematologic malignancies. He has led and participated in several investigator-initiated studies and sponsored clinical trials with cell therapies (CAR-T, CAR-NK, TCR-T) for hematologic malignancies. His research group is also involved in various translational research activities for the standard of care and research CAR-T therapy. Dr. Dahiya’s group was the first group to show the role of fibrinogen in Neurotoxicity associated with CAR-T therapy. They showed vascular injury as manifested by high fibrinogen level is associated with higher Neurotoxicity in patients who receive CAR-T therapy. More recently his group led a novel study of assessing the immune response in COVID-19 disease. They evaluated the immune response in critically ill and non-critically ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19 disease and showed a differential immune response between the groups. Dr. Dahiya’s group also showed and established poor immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines in CART recipients. As such, passive immunity and other strategies to address the issues of immunogenicity is being explored.

    He has published more than 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Blood, Blood Advances, Lancet, Leukemia Research, Neuro-Oncology, and many more. He reviews article submissions for the journals Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology, Thoracic Cancer, and Blood. He serves has the hematology lead editor for the journal Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology.

    He has presented his research findings at conferences such as the annual meetings of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Transplantation and Cell Therapy.

    Dr. Dahiya is a member of the American Society of Hematology and American Society of Transplantation and Cell Therapy.

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Katharine Dahl

    Katharine Dahl

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Kate Dahl specializes in working with children and families who are affected by medical illness. She has practiced at Stanford since 2014 and is the primary pediatric psychologist for the dialysis, kidney transplant, and liver transplant medical teams. Her work often focuses on adjustment to new diagnosis, coping with illness and treatment, and adherence to the medical regimen. She is particularly interested in the experience of adolescents with chronic medical conditions and leads groups for teens who have received kidney and liver transplants.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.